Living Tibetan Spirits

NOVEMBER 11, 2018 – HONORING THE VETERANS OF SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE

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NOVEMBER 11, 2018 – HONORING THE VETERANS OF SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE

November 11, 2018. Honoring the Veterans of Special Frontier Force. The weapon used by the Veterans of Special Frontier Force in Operation Eagle, the Bangladesh Ops of 1971-72.

Veteran’s Day is a tribute to military veterans who have served in the U.S. Armed Forces. Originating in 1919 when President Woodrow Wilson marked a year since the end of the First World War, the day coincides with other days of remembrance around the world including Armistice Day in the United Kingdom and Remembrance Day across the Commonwealth of Nations. Not to be confused with Memorial Day, which honors those who died while in service, Veterans Day honors all military veterans, including the living.

On Sunday, November 11, 2018, I honor the veterans of Special Frontier Force while Tibet, India, and the United States remain silent about the contributions of the living and the dead veterans of Special Frontier Force in support of Freedom.

November 11, 2018. Honoring the Veterans of Special Frontier Force. The weapon used by the Veterans of Special Frontier Force in Operation Eagle, the Bangladesh Ops of 1971-72. 

In my analysis, the military veterans of Special Frontier Force serve the United States for they use the military weapons and military supplies provided by the United States. A soldier is always identified by the military weapon that he uses in his fight against the enemy.

November 11, 2018. Honoring the Veterans of Special Frontier Force. The weapon used by the Veterans of Special Frontier Force in Operation Eagle, the Bangladesh Ops of 1971-72.

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada

SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE

https://bhavanajagat.com/2016/10/22/doomed-gun-of-doom-dooma-nixon-kissinger-vietnam-treason/

VETERANS DAY – ARMISTICE DAY – HONORING ALL WHO SERVED

Clipped from: https://www.thebalancecareers.com/veterans-day-honoring-all-who-served-3332001

Veterans Day In The United States And Europe

November 11, 2018. Honoring the Veterans of Special Frontier Force. Veterans Day Proclamation in 1954 by the US President Dwight Eisenhower.

Many Americans mistakenly believe that Veterans Day is the day America sets aside to honor American military personnel who died in battle or as a result of wounds sustained from combat. That’s not true. Memorial Day is the day set aside to honor America’s war dead.

Veterans Day, on the other hand, honors ALL American veterans, both living and dead. In fact, Veterans Day is largely intended to thank LIVING veterans for dedicated and loyal service to their country. November 11 of each year is the day that we ensure veterans know that we deeply appreciate the sacrifices they have made in the lives to keep our country free.

Armistice Day

To commemorate the ending of the “Great War” (World War I), an “unknown soldier” was buried in the highest place of honor in both England and France (in England, Westminster Abbey; in France, the Arc de Triomphe). These ceremonies took place on November 11th, celebrating the ending of World War I hostilities at 11 a.m., November 11, 1918 (the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month). This day became known internationally as “Armistice Day”.

In 1921, the United States of America followed France and England by laying to rest the remains of a World War I American soldier — his name “known but to God” — on a Virginia hillside overlooking the city of Washington DC and the Potomac River. This site became known as the “Tomb of the Unknown Soldier,” and today is called the “Tomb of the Unknowns.” Located in Arlington National Cemetery, the tomb symbolizes dignity and reverence for the American veteran.

In America, November 11th officially became known as Armistice Day through an act of Congress in 1926. It wasn’t until 12 years later through a similar act that Armistice Day became a national holiday.

The entire World thought that World War I was the “War to end all wars.” Had this been true, the holiday might still be called Armistice Day today. That dream was shattered in 1939 when World War II broke out in Europe. More than 400,000 American service members died during that horrific war.

Veterans Day Creation

In 1954, President Eisenhower signed a bill proclaiming November 11 as Veterans Day and called upon Americans everywhere to rededicate themselves to the cause of peace. He issued a Presidential Order directing the head of the Veterans Administration (now called the Department of Veterans Affairs) to form a Veterans Day National Committee to organize and oversee the national observance of Veterans Day.

Veterans Day National Ceremony

At exactly 11 a.m., each November 11th, a color guard, made up of members from each of the military branches, renders honors to America’s war dead during a heart-moving ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknowns in Arlington National Cemetery.

The President or his representative places a wreath at the Tomb and a bugler sounds Taps. The balance of the ceremony, including a “Parade of Flags” by numerous veterans service organizations, takes place inside the Memorial Amphitheater, adjacent to the Tomb.

In addition to planning and coordinating the National Veterans Day Ceremony, the Veterans Day National Committee supports a number of Veterans Day Regional Sites. These sites conduct Veterans Day celebrations that provide excellent examples for other communities to follow.

Veterans Day Observance

Veterans Day is always observed on November 11, regardless of the day of the week on which it falls. The Veterans Day National Ceremony is always held on Veterans Day itself, even if the holiday falls on a Saturday or Sunday. However, like all other federal holidays, when it falls on a non-workday — Saturday or Sunday — the federal government employees take the day off on Monday (if the holiday falls on Sunday) or Friday (if the holiday falls on Saturday).

This federal law does not apply to state and local governments. They are free to determine local government closings (including school closings) locally. As such, there is no legal requirement that schools close on Veterans Day, and many do not. However, most schools hold Veterans Day activities on Veterans Day and throughout the week of the holiday to honor American veterans.

Allied Veterans Day Around the World

Many other countries honor their veterans on November 11th of each year. However, the name of the holiday and the types of ceremonies differ from the Veterans Day activities in the United States.

Canada, Australia, and Great Britain refer to their holidays as “Remembrance Day.” Canada and Australia observe the day on November 11, and Great Britain conducts their ceremonies on the Sunday nearest to November 11th.

In Canada, the observance of “Remembrance Day” is actually quite similar to the United States in that the day is set aside to honor all of Canada’s veterans, both living and dead. One notable difference is that many Canadians wear a red poppy flower on November 11 to honor their war dead, while the “red poppy” tradition is observed in the United States on Memorial Day.

In Australia, “Remembrance Day” is very much like America’s Memorial Day, in that it’s considered a day to honor Australian veterans who died in the war.

In Great Britain, the day is commemorated by church services and parades of ex-service members in Whitehall, a wide ceremonial avenue leading from London’s Parliament Square to Trafalgar Square. Wreaths of poppies are left at the Cenotaph, a war memorial in Whitehall, which was built after the First World War. At the Cenotaph and elsewhere in the country, a two-minute silence is observed at 11 a.m., to honor those who lost their lives in wars.

November 11, 2018. Honoring the Veterans of Special Frontier Force. The weapon used by the veterans of Special Frontier Force in Operation Eagle, the Bangladesh Ops of 1971-72.

 

 

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THE NEHRU LEGACY – THE COLD WAR IN ASIA

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THE NEHRU LEGACY – THE COLD WAR IN ASIA

The Nehru Legacy. The Cold War in Asia.

Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru’s foreign policy during the Cold War Era is often misunderstood as nations were forced to use secret diplomatic negotiations in the conduct of foreign policy. In my analysis, the Indian Prime Minister took appropriate action not only to defend India’s security interests but also to help Tibet to the extent possible.

I hold the People’s Republic of China completely responsible and accountable for her acts of military aggression during 1950 and later in 1962. I find no reason to blame either Indian Prime Minister or Tibet for China’s misconduct.

I ask my readers to give attention to Indian support to Nationalist China during the concluding years of World War II. Apart from delivering weapons and military supplies to Nationalist China, the US with Indian assistance supplied weapons to Tibet prior to the Communist takeover of the mainland China. This military intervention in Tibet provided an excuse to Communist China to invade Tibet in 1950. I do not find fault with either India or Tibet. Their combined military power is not adequate to maintain the Balance of Power in South Asia. There is nothing wrong if weaker nations use diplomatic negotiations to resolve problems with stronger and powerful nations. It is indeed a practical and rational approach and I would not ridicule such attempts as an appeasement policy.

I uphold the valid concerns shared by India’s former Deputy Prime Minister, but I would not use his concerns to find fault with Prime Minister Nehru’s Foreign Policy Legacy. India has not yet changed the course of the foreign policy direction set up by Nehru.

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada

SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE

https://wholedude.com/2014/11/24/special-frontier-force-the-nehru-legacy/

The Nehru Legacy. The Cold War in Asia.

Opinion, Op Ed

Claude Arpi

The writer is based in South India for the past 40 years. He writes on India, China, Tibet, and Indo-French relations.

Patel-Nehru rift over Tibet & China was deep

Published Nov 8, 2018, 7:46 am IST

Updated Nov 8, 2018, 7:46 am IST

The most serious cause of discord was the invasion of Tibet by the Chinese “Liberation Army” in October 1950.

The Nehru Legacy. The Cold War in Asia.

On October 31, the world’s tallest statue, the Statue of Unity dedicated to Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel, was unveiled by Prime Minister Narendra Modi. (Photo: @narendramodi/Twitter)

On October 31, the world’s tallest statue, the Statue of Unity dedicated to Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel, was unveiled by Prime Minister Narendra Modi. The work on the 182-meter tall statue has been completed after round the clock work by 3,400 laborers and 250 engineers at Sadhu Bet island on Narmada river in Gujarat. Sadhu Bet, located some 3.5 km away from the Narmada Dam, is linked by a 250-meter-long long bridge.

Unfortunately, for several reasons, scarce scholarly research has been done on the internal history of the Congress; the main cause is probably that a section of the party would prefer to keep history under wraps. Take the acute differences of opinion between Sardar Patel, the deputy prime minister, and “Panditji”, as Nehru was then called by Congressmen. In the last weeks of Patel’s life (he passed away on December 15, 1950), there was a deep split between the two leaders, leading to unilateral decisions for the PM, for which India had to pay the heaviest price.

The most serious cause of discord was the invasion of Tibet by the Chinese “Liberation Army” in October 1950. In the course of recent researches in Indian archives, I discovered several new facts. Not only did several senior Congress leaders, led by Patel, violently oppose Nehru’s suicidal policy, but many senior bureaucrats too did not agree with the Prime Minister’s decisions and objected to his policy of appeasement with China, which led India to lose a peaceful border.
On November 11, 1950, the deputy prime minister of India addressed a meeting organized by the Central Aryan Association to commemorate the 67th death anniversary of Swami Dayanand Sarasvati. It was to be his last speech. What did he say? The Sardar spoke of the potential dangers arising from what was happening in Tibet and Nepal, and he exhorted his countrymen: “It was incumbent on the people to rise above party squabbles and unitedly defend their newly won freedom.” He cited the example of Gandhi and Swami Dayanand.

Sardar Patel then criticized the Chinese intervention in Tibet; he asserted that to use the “sword” against the traditionally peace-loving Tibetan people was unjustified: “No other country in the world was as peace-loving as Tibet. India did not believe, therefore, that the Chinese government would actually use force in settling the Tibetan question.” He observed that the Chinese government did not listen to India’s advice to settle the Tibetan issue peacefully: “They marched their armies into Tibet and explained this action by talking of foreign interests intriguing in Tibet against China.” The deputy prime minister added that this fear was unfounded; no outsider was interested in Tibet. The Sardar continued by saying that “nobody could say what the outcome of Chinese action would be. But the use of force ultimately created more fear and tension. It was possible that when a country got drunk with its own military strength and power, it did not think calmly over all issues.” He strongly asserted that the use of arms was wrong: “In the present state of the world, such events might easily touch off a new world war, which would mean disaster for mankind.”

Did he know that it was his last message? “Do not let cowardice cripple you. Do not run away from danger. The three-year-old freedom of the country has to be fully protected. India today is surrounded by all sorts of dangers and it is for the people today to remember the teachings of the two great saints and face fearlessly all dangers.”

The deputy prime minister concluded: “In this kalyug, we shall return ahimsa for ahimsa. But if anybody resorted to force against us, we shall meet it with force.” He ended his speech citing Swami Dayananda: “People should also remember that Swamiji did not get a foreign education. He was the product of Indian culture. Although it was true that they in India had to borrow whatever was good and useful from other countries, it was right and proper that Indian culture was accorded its due place.” Who is ready to listen to this, even today?

Days earlier, Patel had written a “prophetic” letter to Nehru, detailing the implications for India of Tibet’s invasion. In fact, Patel used a draft done by Sir Girja Shankar Bajpai, the secretary-general of the ministry of external affairs and Commonwealth relations. However, Nehru decided to ignore Patel’s letter.
Witnessing the nefarious influence of K.M. Panikkar, the Indian ambassador to China, who ceaselessly defended China’s interests, Bajpai, the most seasoned Indian diplomat, had lost his cool. On October 31, in an internal note, he detailed the sequence of events which followed Tibet’s invasion and the role of Panikkar, whose attitude was compared to Sir Neville Chamberlain’s towards Hitler.

Bajpai’s anger demonstrates the frustration of many senior officers; the account starts on July 15, when the governor of Assam informed Delhi that, according to the information received by the local intelligence bureau, Chinese troops, “in unknown strength, had been moving towards Tibet from three directions.” Not only was Panikkar unable to get any confirmation, but he virtually justified Beijing’s military action by writing: “In view of frustration in regard to Formosa, the Tibetan move was not unlikely.” During the next three months, the Indian ambassador would systematically take the Chinese side.

After receiving Bajpai’s note, Patel wrote back: “I need hardly say that I have read it with a great deal of interest and profit to myself and it has resulted in a much better understanding of the points at issue and general, though serious, nature of the problem. The Chinese advance into Tibet upsets all our security calculations. … I entirely agree with you that a reconsideration of our military position and a redisposition of our forces are inescapable.”

Some more details of the seriousness of the situation filter through Inside Story of Sardar Patel: The Diary of Maniben Patel, the daughter of the Sardar. In an entry on November 2, 1950, Maniben wrote: “Rajaji and Jawaharlal had a heated altercation about the Tibet policy. Rajaji does not at all appreciate this policy. Rajaji very unhappy — Bapu (Patel) did not speak at all.”

Later in the afternoon, “Munshi complained about Tibet policy. The question concerns the whole nation — said he had written a personal letter to Panditji on Tibet.”

Later, Patel told K.M. Munshi: “Rajaji, you (Munshi), I (Patel), Baldev Singh, (C.D.) Deshmukh, Jagjivan Ram, and even Sri Prakash are on one side, while Gopalaswamy, Rafi, Maulana (Azad) are on his side.” There was a vertical split in the Cabinet, and it was not only about Tibet. The situation would deteriorate further during the following weeks.

On December 12, Patel was divested on his portfolios. Nehru wrote: “In view of Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel’s ill-health it is absolutely necessary that he should have complete rest and freedom from worry, so as to be able to recuperate as rapidly as possible. …no work should be sent to him and no references made to him in regard to the work of these ministries.”

Gopalaswami Ayyangar, from the “other side”, was allotted the ministry of states and Nehru kept the ministry of home. The Sardar was only informed after the changes were made. He was a dejected man. Three days later he passed away.

Tags: Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel, Jawaharlal Nehru

Copyright © 2015 – 2018 Deccan Chronicle.

The Nehru Legacy. The Cold War in Asia.

 

 

 

BLESSINGS FOR PEACE – PRAYERS TO LHASA RIVER

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BLESSINGS FOR PEACE – PRAYERS TO LHASA RIVER

Blessings for Peace. Prayers to Lhasa River.

I offer my prayers to Lhasa River to receive the Blessings of Peace in Occupied Tibet.

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada

SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE

https://wholedude.com/2018/07/03/living-tibetan-spirits-offer-prayers-to-mount-kailash/

Reed flowers are seen in Wetland, Tibet

Clipped from: http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/a/201811/05/WS5bdfbc0da310eff30328695a_6.html

Blessings for Peace. Prayers to Lhasa River.

Photo taken on Nov 4, 2018, shows reed flowers in a wetland in Qushui county of Lhasa, Tibet. [Photo/Xinhua]

Blessings for Peace. Prayers to Lhasa River.

Photo taken on Nov 4, 2018, shows reed flowers in a wetland in Qushui county of Lhasa, Tibet. [Photo/Xinhua]

Blessings for Peace. Prayers to Lhasa River.

Photo taken on Nov 4, 2018, shows reed flowers in a wetland in Qushui county of Lhasa, Tibet. [Photo/Xinhua]

Blessings for Peace. Prayers to Lhasa River.

Photo taken on Nov 4, 2018, shows reed flowers in a wetland in Qushui county of Lhasa, Tibet. [Photo/Xinhua]

Blessings for Peace. Prayers to Lhasa River.

Photo taken on Nov 4, 2018, shows reed flowers in a wetland in Qushui county of Lhasa, Tibet. [Photo/Xinhua]

Blessings for Peace. Prayers to Lhasa River.

Photo taken on Nov 4, 2018, shows reed flowers in a wetland in Qushui county of Lhasa, Tibet. [Photo/Xinhua]

Blessings for Peace. Prayers to Lhasa River.


THE DALAI LAMA LIFE CYCLE – THE CYCLICAL FLOW OF TIMES

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THE DALAI LAMA LIFE CYCLE – THE CYCLICAL FLOW OF TIMES

The Dalai Lama Life Cycle. The Cyclical Flow of Times.

The photo images that capture the physical appearance of the 14th Dalai Lama may relate to just one stage of the Dalai Lama Life Cycle. As per Tibetan faith and belief, the 14th Dalai Lama is the reincarnation of the 13th Dalai Lama. The Dalai Lama Life Cycle started in 1391 centuries before their individual lifespans.

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada

SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE

https://wholedude.com/2015/08/24/tibet-awareness-potala-palace-lhasa-tibet/

The Dalai Lama Life Cycle. The Cyclical Flow of Times.

Frame by frame: Photographer Raghu Rai’s book on the 14th Dalai Lama is personal, deep and immersive

Clipped from: https://bangaloremirror.indiatimes.com/opinion/sunday-read/frame-by-frame-photographer-raghu-rais-book-on-the-14th-dalai-lama-is-personal-deep-and-immersive/articleshow/66492014.cms

The Dalai Lama Life Cycle. The Cyclical Flow of Times.

Dalai Lama

By Priyadarshini Nandy

Raghu Rai’s book captures the many shades of the Tibetan spiritual leader

Raghu Rai’s latest book – A God in Exile: The Fourteenth Dalai Lama – focuses entirely on the Dalai Lama in his various moods and moments – be it when he’s interacting with his followers or simply unwinding. The series of black and white photographs are in no particular order, but it gives readers a glimpse into the life of the spiritual leader that Rai has witnessed over three decades. “He has an aura about him, one that can probably be felt for kilometers around him. He can see through you. We are truly lucky to have him in our lives. To me, he is a rare individual,” Rai adds.

But the two weren’t always so familiar. Before meeting the Dalai Lama in 1975, Rai’s knowledge of the man was pretty much limited to a book. “I had read My Land, My People (the Dalai Lama’s autobiography). It’s one of the most understated books I’d read in a while. Powerful, and moving – it sort of makes you feel responsible towards the people of Tibet. I knew that he was their spiritual leader, someone who brings out the Buddha in you… and that was pretty much it,” Rai says.

All that was going to change, when Rai was sent to Ladakh by The Statesman, to cover a three-day teaching session by the Dalai Lama. Little did Rai know back then that his relationship with the Dalai Lama was going to deepen over the years, and turn into a long-lasting friendship.

He (the Dalai Lama) has an aura about him, one that can probably be felt for kilometers around him. He can see through you. We are truly lucky to have him in our lives

Raghu Rai

“After ’75, I met him next only a decade later. I have been wanting to do a book on the Tibetans in exile, and I followed him to Bodh Gaya. But when I reached, I was informed that he was busy with a personal ritual and no one was allowed to disturb him. But I am adamant. I told them I knew him, and I simply must see him. After great difficulty, I was shown to his tent but was told not to enter. I had to insert my camera lens through a gap in the tent to take his photograph. But he spotted me and recognized me. He asked me to come in, and I was allowed to take his photos.

I was there for about four-five days and given complete access,” Rai adds.

The Dalai Lama Life Cycle. The Cyclical Flow of Times.

Being blessed at Judah Hymn Synagogue, wearing a yarmulke

The end result was Tibet in Exile (1990), with text by Jane Perkins (who’s also written for the current book) – a brilliant visual record of the Dalai Lama and the Tibetans who live in exile.

Over time, Rai kept going back to Dharamsala to meet the Dalai Lama.

“I did assignments for various magazines, and every time I went there, I would tell him it was really important. It was gracious of him to give me complete access, and he would even introduce me as his friend.” Sharing an old story, Rai says that during one of his shoots at Dharamsala, His Holiness came out from one his prayers, and gave him an off-white stone just before Rai was leaving. “I took it and put it into my camera bag. Many years later, my health worsened. I would feel uneasy and breathless; tired during assignments. What I did then was, taken that stone out and saw there was a small hole in it. I strung a thread to it and began to wear it around my neck. And I went back to work. In the year 2000, Nita (Rai’s wife) decided enough was enough and took me to a doctor. I was told that my heart had 90 per cent blockages, and anything could happen at any moment. I would like to believe that the stone is what protected me. I had an open-heart surgery later and my wife and I decided to go to Dharamsala to thank the Dalai Lama. But when I did thank him and told him how his stone had saved my life he laughed and said, “I don’t think I can do these things”. However, he pulled me into a prolonged embrace before we left, and I felt a kind of energy that I had never felt before. I think he just heals you by instinct. He can feel and smell what’s going on in your life.”

The Dalai Lama Life Cycle. The Cyclical Flow of Times.

His Holiness’s morning occupation is often rereading Tibetan scriptures

Rai has many such stories to share – about the small jokes the Dalai Lama would crack ever so often; how he would sit in meditation for hours when no one could move him; the way he would interact with the people who had come to take his blessing – and these stories have made their way to this black and white photobook. “I have seen the spiritual connection he has with things. I have seen his compassion. And I have seen his humorous side. Once, I went to photograph him when he was sitting with a group of southeast Asian monks. It was a serious moment. And yet, in the middle of that, he spotted me and asked me why was I wearing a cap. He then asked me to come up to him and tugged at my cap and said “I want to see how much hair you have left”, and began to laugh. And with him, so did everyone. He’s like that – childlike and innocent,” Rai adds.

Interestingly, A God in Exile was not something Rai had planned. “I had seen a book on him by the Swiss photographer Manuel Bauer, and I was jealous. The photographs in the book were amazing. I honestly felt as if someone had stolen my sweetheart from me.

The Dalai Lama Life Cycle. Photographer Raghu Rai.

Raghu Rai

So I told myself that even I would do a book, and mine would be better. So in 2016, I decided to put my collection of photographs of the Dalai Lama together. I think I can say that my book is now the best one,” Rai says with a laughter.

– Photographs From A God in Exile: The Fourteenth Dalai Lama, by Raghu Rai. Published by Roli Books

The Dalai Lama Life Cycle. The Cyclical Flow of Times. The Great 5th Dalai Lama.

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THE 14th DALAI LAMA – THE SUPREME RULER OF TIBET LIVING IN EXILE

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THE 14th DALAI LAMA – THE SUPREME RULER OF TIBET LIVING IN EXILE

The Official Enthronement Ceremony of the 14th Dalai Lama in Lhasa.

I am pleased to share the photo images of the 14th Dalai Lama living in exile.

All photographs are part of the book, ‘A God in Exile: The Fourteenth Dalai Lama by Raghu Rai’, published by Roli Books.

The BBC News shared these photo images describing the Dalai Lama as a ‘spiritual leader’. Photographer and author Raghu Rai went a step further in recognizing the Dalai Lama as “A GOD IN EXILE.”

In my analysis, the relevance of the 14th Dalai Lama relates to the Institution of Dalai Lama that governs Tibet giving a sense of reality to the Tibetan Living Experience. If the Dalai Lama is just a Spiritual Leader, he would not be living in exile. If the Dalai Lama is indeed a ‘GOD’, Communist China would have utterly failed in crushing the massive Tibetan Uprising of March 1959.

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada

SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE

https://bhavanajagat.com/2018/09/02/the-white-house-of-supreme-ruler-of-tibet/

The 14th Dalai Lama. The Supreme Ruler of Tibet living in exile.

The Dalai Lama: Intimate portrait of a spiritual leader – BBC News

Clipped from: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-india-45585890

The 14th Dalai Lama. The Supreme Ruler of Tibet living in exile.

Image copyright Raghu Rai Image caption The Dalai Lama watching the TV series, Mahabharata

A new book by acclaimed Indian photographer Raghu Rai offers an unprecedented glimpse into the life of one of the world’s leading religious figures.

A God In Exile is the result of a photographer’s decades-long insight into his muse. Rai took his first picture of the iconic Tibetan spiritual leader in 1975.

He recalled being stopped by the Dalai Lama’s security. “I somehow managed to make eye contact with His Holiness and asked him if I could take some photos of him. He smiled and said yes,” Rai told the BBC.

Over the years, he has photographed the Dalai Lama many times and has cultivated a “deep friendship”.

In March 1959, as Chinese troops crushed an attempted uprising in Tibet, the 14th Dalai Lama, who was born Tenzin Gyatso, fled into India. He was then a young man in his mid-20s.

The 14th Dalai Lama. The Supreme Ruler of Tibet living in exile.

Image copyright Raghu Rai

The Indian government granted him asylum and he settled in the northern town of Dharamshala. About 80,000 Tibetans followed him into exile, most of whom settled in the same area.

The 14th Dalai Lama. The Supreme Ruler of Tibet living in exile.

Image copyright Raghu Rai

Thronged by Tibetan worshippers and tourists, the Dalai Lama is seen in the above image blessing a woman at a ceremony.

“When he sees his Tibetans, my god! You should see his eyes! It’s like a grandfather doting on his grandchildren,” Rai says.

In 2014, Rai decided to curate the hundreds of photos he had taken of the Dalai Lama and compile them into a book – a project which, he said, has been in the making for 40 years.

· The ancient wisdom the Dalai Lama hopes will enrich the world

·

The 14th Dalai Lama. The Supreme Ruler of Tibet living in exile.

Image copyright Raghu Rai

Many of the photos in the collection capture the Dalai Lama in candid moments, giving us an intimate glimpse into his everyday life.

“He loves to play with animals – I was waiting for him one day when he suddenly showed up with a cat,” Rai says.

The 14th Dalai Lama. The Supreme Ruler of Tibet living in exile.

Image copyright Raghu Rai

Rai also captured scenes from the Dalai Lama’s 80th birthday celebrations in 2015 at home in Dharamshala.

He hosted his siblings, including his older brother, Gyalo Thondup (pictured above), whom he introduced to guests as a “troublemaker”.

The book’s preface, written by Rai, offers readers an account of his interactions with the Dalai Lama.

“He left an indelible impression on me – gentle, gracious, humble and full of wonder. It is peculiar to say such a thing, but I got the strange yet pleasant feeling of being equals, despite his position. In hindsight, I realise it was because His Holiness behaved with such unfeigned kindness and lack of vanity.”

The 14th Dalai Lama. The Supreme Ruler of Tibet living in exile.

Image copyright Raghu Rai

Many images in the book feature the Dalai Lama performing innocuous chores such as repairing his TV or gardening in his home – tasks that he always did himself, Rai says.

The 14th Dalai Lama. The Supreme Ruler of Tibet living in exile.

Image copyright Raghu Rai

“In a lot of ways, he gave me everything a photographer ever wants from a subject,” the photographer says.

The 14th Dalai Lama. The Supreme Ruler of Tibet living in exile.

Image copyright Raghu Rai

Among the Dalai Lama’s favorite places at his home is the garden, where he grows all sorts of plants.

All photographs are part of the book, ‘A God in Exile: The Fourteenth Dalai Lama by Raghu Rai’, published by Roli Books.

The 14th Dalai Lama. The Supreme Ruler of Tibet living in exile.

THE POPE’S JUDAS KISS TO SEAL THE DEAL WITH COMMUNIST CHINA

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THE POPE’S JUDAS KISS TO SEAL THE DEAL WITH COMMUNIST CHINA

The Pope’s Judas Kiss to Seal the Deal with Communist China.

In my analysis, the Vatican deal with Communist China represents an act of betrayal. Pope Francis betrayed Jesus Christ to permit Communist China a role in the selection of Archbishops for Catholic Churches in China.

The Living Tibetan Spirits would not expect His Holiness the Dalai Lama to walk in the footsteps of Pope Francis to forsake his faith to save the Dalai Lama Institution of Tibet.

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada

SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE

The Pope’s Judas Kiss to Seal the Deal with Communist China.

The Pope has kissed and made up with China. Can the Dalai Lama?

The Pope’s Judas Kiss to Seal the Deal with Communist China.

Pope Francis has pulled off a landmark deal by getting Beijing to recognize the Vatican’s influence – and his approach may impart valuable lessons to the Dalai Lama, should there be any hope for reconciliation with Tibet on the cards

By Sourabh Gupta

28 Sep 2018

Clipped from: https://www.scmp.com/week-asia/geopolitics/article/2166226/pope-has-made-china-can-dalai-lama

Pope Francis has pulled off a landmark deal by getting Beijing to recognize the Vatican’s influence – and his approach may impart valuable lessons to the Dalai Lama, should there be any hope for reconciliation with Tibet on the cards

The Pope’s Judas Kiss to Seal the Deal with Communist China.

The Dalai Lama must make his peace with an antithetical political authority and persevere in good faith. Photo: Reuters

The reigning Bishop of Rome, Francis, is not your typical stodgy pontiff. In the five short years since his elevation as the first non-European head of the Roman Catholic Church since 741 AD, he has displayed latitude of mind, the courage of conviction, and deftness of diplomatic skill that is rare even among statesmen.

In August 2014, on entering Chinese airspace during a flight to Seoul, he broke six decades of silence between the Vatican and the head of China’s government by posting a message of goodwill to President Xi Jinping. Fittingly, on his birthday later that December, talks brokered by Francis were announced that would in time lead to the normalization of ties between the Castro regime in Cuba and the Obama administration. The US-Cuba agreement was signed at the Vatican Secretariat of State. In February 2016, almost a thousand years after the rupture of the Eastern and Western branches of Christianity, Pope Francis held the first meeting with his Russian Orthodox counterpart, Patriarch Kirill, in Havana. Francis’ millennia-spanning achievements are not one for the faint-hearted.

Last week, Pope Francis registered his biggest diplomatic breakthrough yet: a landmark agreement with the government of the People’s Republic on the ordination of bishops in China. As per the agreement, Beijing – 67 years after snapping ties with the Vatican – will formally recognize the Pope’s jurisdiction as the head of the Catholic Church in China as well as the final authority in deciding on candidates for bishops in the country.

The Chinese Catholic Patriotic Association (CCPA), the “self-run Church” hitherto established and controlled by the state, is to be downgraded and reoriented. In exchange, Pope Francis is expected to lift the excommunications of seven CCPA-installed bishops and formally recognize them as the leaders of their dioceses. More broadly, a mechanism that enables Beijing to provide its acceptable slate of candidates and the Vatican to have a final say in selection will now be formalized.

The fate of the three dozen or so Vatican-approved prelates, some of whom are in prison, who are not recognized by the CCPA is unclear at this time. The larger hope, though, is that as the splintering of the Catholic Church in China is reversed, the churches above and underground will in time be reconciled. Perhaps, a papal visit could be on the cards, too.

The Pope’s Judas Kiss to Seal the Deal with Communist China.

Pope Francis’ list of achievements span millennia of history. Photo: AFP

Both sides stand to gain handsomely from the compromise. For the Vatican, its pre-eminence on all matters ecclesiastical in the sovereign territorial space of China has been formally confirmed for the first time by the communist government in Beijing. For the Chinese Communist Party, its overarching and “guiding” role in harnessing religious belief to “help social harmony, modernization [and a] healthy civilization” – a key principle of its post-1980s religious policy – is vindicated without having to cede (though having to share) control on key decision-making to an entity that is housed beyond its sovereign territorial space.

Now, if the Vatican can pull off a deal with Beijing, what about the Dalai Lama? As plausible as it may look in theory, the ramifications for the Tibetan Buddhist leader are more profound. And the bottom line is equally stark: while Beijing could in theory share, it will never cede control over key Tibetan Buddhism-related personnel matters, notably the recognition of tulkus (or “living Buddhas”), as long as the Dalai Lama remains in exile. And given that the Dalai Lama is double-hatted in Tibet’s theocratic political structure as its secular leader over a defined territorial space (unlike the Pope), it is all the more likely that Beijing will refuse to share – let alone cede – practical control over key personnel matters until the Dalai Lama returns to Tibet.

The failed effort in arriving at a consensual selection of a new Panchen Lama in the mid-1990s holds cautionary lessons. Following the untoward death of the revered lama in 1989, Beijing announced a search, selection and recognition process for his successor that initially ruled out a role for the Dalai Lama. Convinced otherwise by resident high lamas, Beijing reversed course in due time and accepted the involvement of the Dalai Lama in principle – if only to rubber-stamp its anointed choice.

By 1995, however, Beijing allegedly went so far as to turn a blind eye to a slate of candidates that it’s officially sanctioned search party (headed by a respected lama from Shigatse) had clandestinely submitted to the Dalai Lama for his prior approval. The process broke down in May that year, following the Dalai Lama’s fait accompli announcement of a young boy from northwest Tibet as the reincarnation of the 10th Panchen Lama.

The Pope’s Judas Kiss to Seal the Deal with Communist China.

The Vatican’s China deal has profound ramifications for the Tibetan Buddhist leader. Photo: Getty

Beijing’s essential bottom line remained consistent throughout while the prerogative of the Dalai Lama could be acknowledged and religious authority shared, akin to the China-Vatican accord, the overarching guiding role over religion in sovereign Tibetan territory rested ultimately with Beijing.

Four hundred years ago, the great Qing dynasty emperor, Kangxi – a patron of Jesuit cartography, astronomy and engineering – had insisted that Chinese rites of ancestor worship and public homage to Confucius, being civil rather than religious practices, should continue to be practiced by his converted Christian subjects. Conflating Kangxi’s injunction with an intrusion on the paramountcy of church doctrine, Pope Clement XI forbade Catholic missionaries from following the Emperor’s orders.

The episode did not end well for the Church. No less than China’s communist rulers today, the Kangxi Emperor refused to cede Beijing’s overarching guiding role over religion – and that too to an entity housed beyond its sovereign territorial space.

While one does not know if the Communist Party’s rule in Beijing will last as long the Qing dynasty’s multi-century reign, it is not about to disappear any time soon. The onus resides on the Dalai Lama’s shoulders to find a way to make peace and comity with Beijing – at least on matters that touch wholly and exclusively on Tibetan Buddhism. Dealing with the fraught issue of the limits of Tibet’s political and territorial autonomy is a different matter.

In March 2014, standing at the UNESCO headquarters in Paris, President Xi Jinping extolled the profound impact of Buddhism in China. If a monotheist leader from distant Latin America carrying the Catholic Church’s dubious historical baggage can arrive at a principled compromise with the leadership in Beijing, surely the Dalai Lama could – or should – be able to do better. But for that, the Dalai Lama must heed the lessons of Francis – foremost, make one’s peace with and accommodate an antithetical political authority and, secondarily, persevere in good faith to realize this accommodation. Is his Excellency listening?

Sourabh Gupta is a senior fellow at the Institute for China-America Studies in Washington

The Pope’s Judas Kiss to Seal the Deal with Communist China.

SEPTEMBER 22 – THIS DAY IN HISTORY – MY QUEST FOR FREEDOM TRAPS ME IN SLAVERY

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SEPTEMBER 22 – THIS DAY IN HISTORY – MY QUEST FOR FREEDOM TRAPS ME IN SLAVERY

September 22. This Day in History. My Quest for Freedom Traps me in Slavery. My Journey to Chakrata and Beyond.

On September 22, 1971, I was Taken on Strength (TOS) of Establishment No. 22, Special Frontier Force, a military organization created in response to ‘The Cold War in Asia.’

On September 22, 2018, I live in Ann Arbor, Michigan to welcome the first day of Fall Season. Today, I claim that my quest for Freedom in Occupied Tibet traps me in Slavery in a nation which abolished Slavery with a presidential proclamation on September 22.

On September 22, 1971, I had the freedom to reject my posting to Establishment No. 22. I was given the choice to choose or decline rendering service in support of Freedom in Occupied Tibet. The choice to serve in Establishment No. 22 comes with risks for the Service Mission differs from the military mission of Indian Army which I joined on a voluntary basis.

It may appear that I am making my own choices in accepting calculated risks to my life. On September 22, 2018, I am still struggling to reconcile with the choices I made for I must reconcile with the reality of my Slavery while living in a country which sponsored my quest for Freedom in Occupied Tibet.

On September 22, 1971, I did not arrive at the final destination of my life. Chakrata represents the struggle ahead, a struggle waiting for me before I can arrive at the final destination of my life.

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada

SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE

https://bhavanajagat.com/2013/03/27/special-frontier-force-establishment-number-22-the-central-intelligence-agency/

September 22. This Day in History. My Quest for Freedom traps me in Slavery. My Journey to Chakrata and Beyond.

SEPTEMBER 22, THIS DAY IN HISTORY – WHAT HAPPENED TODAY

Clipped from: http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history

On this day in 1862, President Abraham Lincoln issues a preliminary Emancipation Proclamation, which sets a date for the freedom of more than 3 million black slaves in the United States and recasts the Civil War as a fight against slavery.

When the Civil War broke out in 1861, shortly after Lincoln’s inauguration as America’s 16th president, he maintained that the war was about restoring the Union and not about slavery. He avoided issuing an anti-slavery proclamation immediately, despite the urgings of abolitionists and radical Republicans, as well as his personal belief that slavery was morally repugnant. Instead, Lincoln chose to move cautiously until he could gain wide support from the public for such a measure.

In July 1862, Lincoln informed his cabinet that he would issue an emancipation proclamation but that it would exempt the so-called border states, which had slaveholders but remained loyal to the Union. His cabinet persuaded him not to make the announcement until after a Union victory. Lincoln’s opportunity came following the Union win at the Battle of Antietam in September 1862. On September 22, the president announced that slaves in areas still in rebellion within 100 days would be free.

On January 1, 1863, Lincoln issued the final Emancipation Proclamation, which declared “that all persons held as slaves” within the rebel states “are, and henceforward shall be free.” The proclamation also called for the recruitment and establishment of black military units among the Union forces. An estimated 180,000 African-Americans went on to serve in the army, while another 18,000 served in the navy.

After the Emancipation Proclamation, backing the Confederacy was seen as favoring slavery. It became impossible for anti-slavery nations such as Great Britain and France, who had been friendly to the Confederacy, to get involved on behalf of the South. The proclamation also unified and strengthened Lincoln’s party, the Republicans, helping them stay in power for the next two decades.

The proclamation was a presidential order and not a law passed by Congress, so Lincoln then pushed for an antislavery amendment to the U.S. Constitution to ensure its permanence. With the passage of the 13th Amendment in 1865, slavery was eliminated throughout America (although blacks would face another century of struggle before they truly began to gain equal rights).

Lincoln’s handwritten draft of the final Emancipation Proclamation was destroyed in the Chicago Fire of 1871. Today, the original official version of the document is housed in the National Archives in Washington, D.C.

Also on this day

Civil War

1862

Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation is announced

Motivated by his growing concern for the inhumanity of slavery as well as practical political concerns, President Abraham Lincoln changes the course of the war and American history by issuing the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation. Announced a week after the nominal Union victory at the Battle of Antietam, near Sharpsburg, Maryland.

Cold War

1961

President Kennedy signs Peace Corps legislation

In an important victory for his Cold War foreign policy, President John F. Kennedy signs legislation establishing the Peace Corps as a permanent government agency. Kennedy believed that the Peace Corps could provide a new and unique weapon in the war against communism.

1975

President Ford survives a second assassination attempt

On this day in 1975, Sarah Jane Moore aims a gun at President Gerald Ford as he leaves the Saint Francis Hotel in San Francisco, California. The attempt on the president’s life came only 17 days after another woman had tried to assassinate Ford.

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2018. MY PASSION FOR FREEDOM IN TIBET WHICH BEGAN AT CHAKRATA DOES NOT RECONCILE WITH MY SLAVERY OF TODAY. THE SCENIC BEAUTY OF CHAKRATA PLAYED NO ROLE IN THE CHOICE I MADE ON SEPTEMBER 22, 1971.

Chakrata is not the final destination of my life. It is just the beginning of a struggle that remains ahead, both in terms of time and location.

September 22. This Day in History. My Quest for Freedom Traps me in Slavery. My Journey to Chakrata and Beyond.
September 22. This Day in History. My Quest for Freedom Traps me in Slavery. My Journey to Chakrata and Beyond.
September 22. This Day in History. My Quest for Freedom traps me in Slavery. My Journey to Chakrata and Beyond.
September 22. This Day in History. My Quest for Freedom Traps me in Slavery. My Journey to Chakrata and Beyond.
September 22. This Day in History. My Quest for Freedom Traps me in Slavery. My Journey to Chakrata and Beyond.
September 22. This Day in History. My Quest for Freedom Traps me in Slavery. My Journey to Chakrata and Beyond.
September 22. This Day in History. My Quest for Freedom Traps me in Slavery. My Journey to Chakrata and Beyond.
September 22. This Day in History. My Quest for Freedom Traps me in Slavery. My Journey to Chakrata and Beyond.
September 22. This Day in History. My Quest for Freedom Traps me in Slavery. My Journey to Chakrata and Beyond.
September 22. This Day in History. My Quest for Freedom Traps me in Slavery. My Journey to Chakrata and Beyond.
September 22. This Day in History. My Quest for Freedom Traps me in Slavery. My Journey to Chakrata and Beyond.
September 22. This Day in History. My Quest for Freedom Traps me in Slavery. My Journey to Chakrata and Beyond.
September 22. This Day in History. My Quest for Freedom Traps me in Slavery. My Journey to Chakrata and Beyond.
September 22. This Day in History. My Quest for Freedom Traps me in Slavery. My Journey to Chakrata and Beyond.