NOVEMBER 11, 2018 – HONORING THE VETERANS OF SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE

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NOVEMBER 11, 2018 – HONORING THE VETERANS OF SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE

November 11, 2018. Honoring the Veterans of Special Frontier Force. The weapon used by the Veterans of Special Frontier Force in Operation Eagle, the Bangladesh Ops of 1971-72.

Veteran’s Day is a tribute to military veterans who have served in the U.S. Armed Forces. Originating in 1919 when President Woodrow Wilson marked a year since the end of the First World War, the day coincides with other days of remembrance around the world including Armistice Day in the United Kingdom and Remembrance Day across the Commonwealth of Nations. Not to be confused with Memorial Day, which honors those who died while in service, Veterans Day honors all military veterans, including the living.

On Sunday, November 11, 2018, I honor the veterans of Special Frontier Force while Tibet, India, and the United States remain silent about the contributions of the living and the dead veterans of Special Frontier Force in support of Freedom.

November 11, 2018. Honoring the Veterans of Special Frontier Force. The weapon used by the Veterans of Special Frontier Force in Operation Eagle, the Bangladesh Ops of 1971-72. 

In my analysis, the military veterans of Special Frontier Force serve the United States for they use the military weapons and military supplies provided by the United States. A soldier is always identified by the military weapon that he uses in his fight against the enemy.

November 11, 2018. Honoring the Veterans of Special Frontier Force. The weapon used by the Veterans of Special Frontier Force in Operation Eagle, the Bangladesh Ops of 1971-72.

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada

SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE

https://bhavanajagat.com/2016/10/22/doomed-gun-of-doom-dooma-nixon-kissinger-vietnam-treason/

VETERANS DAY – ARMISTICE DAY – HONORING ALL WHO SERVED

Clipped from: https://www.thebalancecareers.com/veterans-day-honoring-all-who-served-3332001

Veterans Day In The United States And Europe

November 11, 2018. Honoring the Veterans of Special Frontier Force. Veterans Day Proclamation in 1954 by the US President Dwight Eisenhower.

Many Americans mistakenly believe that Veterans Day is the day America sets aside to honor American military personnel who died in battle or as a result of wounds sustained from combat. That’s not true. Memorial Day is the day set aside to honor America’s war dead.

Veterans Day, on the other hand, honors ALL American veterans, both living and dead. In fact, Veterans Day is largely intended to thank LIVING veterans for dedicated and loyal service to their country. November 11 of each year is the day that we ensure veterans know that we deeply appreciate the sacrifices they have made in the lives to keep our country free.

Armistice Day

To commemorate the ending of the “Great War” (World War I), an “unknown soldier” was buried in the highest place of honor in both England and France (in England, Westminster Abbey; in France, the Arc de Triomphe). These ceremonies took place on November 11th, celebrating the ending of World War I hostilities at 11 a.m., November 11, 1918 (the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month). This day became known internationally as “Armistice Day”.

In 1921, the United States of America followed France and England by laying to rest the remains of a World War I American soldier — his name “known but to God” — on a Virginia hillside overlooking the city of Washington DC and the Potomac River. This site became known as the “Tomb of the Unknown Soldier,” and today is called the “Tomb of the Unknowns.” Located in Arlington National Cemetery, the tomb symbolizes dignity and reverence for the American veteran.

In America, November 11th officially became known as Armistice Day through an act of Congress in 1926. It wasn’t until 12 years later through a similar act that Armistice Day became a national holiday.

The entire World thought that World War I was the “War to end all wars.” Had this been true, the holiday might still be called Armistice Day today. That dream was shattered in 1939 when World War II broke out in Europe. More than 400,000 American service members died during that horrific war.

Veterans Day Creation

In 1954, President Eisenhower signed a bill proclaiming November 11 as Veterans Day and called upon Americans everywhere to rededicate themselves to the cause of peace. He issued a Presidential Order directing the head of the Veterans Administration (now called the Department of Veterans Affairs) to form a Veterans Day National Committee to organize and oversee the national observance of Veterans Day.

Veterans Day National Ceremony

At exactly 11 a.m., each November 11th, a color guard, made up of members from each of the military branches, renders honors to America’s war dead during a heart-moving ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknowns in Arlington National Cemetery.

The President or his representative places a wreath at the Tomb and a bugler sounds Taps. The balance of the ceremony, including a “Parade of Flags” by numerous veterans service organizations, takes place inside the Memorial Amphitheater, adjacent to the Tomb.

In addition to planning and coordinating the National Veterans Day Ceremony, the Veterans Day National Committee supports a number of Veterans Day Regional Sites. These sites conduct Veterans Day celebrations that provide excellent examples for other communities to follow.

Veterans Day Observance

Veterans Day is always observed on November 11, regardless of the day of the week on which it falls. The Veterans Day National Ceremony is always held on Veterans Day itself, even if the holiday falls on a Saturday or Sunday. However, like all other federal holidays, when it falls on a non-workday — Saturday or Sunday — the federal government employees take the day off on Monday (if the holiday falls on Sunday) or Friday (if the holiday falls on Saturday).

This federal law does not apply to state and local governments. They are free to determine local government closings (including school closings) locally. As such, there is no legal requirement that schools close on Veterans Day, and many do not. However, most schools hold Veterans Day activities on Veterans Day and throughout the week of the holiday to honor American veterans.

Allied Veterans Day Around the World

Many other countries honor their veterans on November 11th of each year. However, the name of the holiday and the types of ceremonies differ from the Veterans Day activities in the United States.

Canada, Australia, and Great Britain refer to their holidays as “Remembrance Day.” Canada and Australia observe the day on November 11, and Great Britain conducts their ceremonies on the Sunday nearest to November 11th.

In Canada, the observance of “Remembrance Day” is actually quite similar to the United States in that the day is set aside to honor all of Canada’s veterans, both living and dead. One notable difference is that many Canadians wear a red poppy flower on November 11 to honor their war dead, while the “red poppy” tradition is observed in the United States on Memorial Day.

In Australia, “Remembrance Day” is very much like America’s Memorial Day, in that it’s considered a day to honor Australian veterans who died in the war.

In Great Britain, the day is commemorated by church services and parades of ex-service members in Whitehall, a wide ceremonial avenue leading from London’s Parliament Square to Trafalgar Square. Wreaths of poppies are left at the Cenotaph, a war memorial in Whitehall, which was built after the First World War. At the Cenotaph and elsewhere in the country, a two-minute silence is observed at 11 a.m., to honor those who lost their lives in wars.

November 11, 2018. Honoring the Veterans of Special Frontier Force. The weapon used by the veterans of Special Frontier Force in Operation Eagle, the Bangladesh Ops of 1971-72.

 

 

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THE NEHRU LEGACY – THE COLD WAR IN ASIA

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THE NEHRU LEGACY – THE COLD WAR IN ASIA

The Nehru Legacy. The Cold War in Asia.

Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru’s foreign policy during the Cold War Era is often misunderstood as nations were forced to use secret diplomatic negotiations in the conduct of foreign policy. In my analysis, the Indian Prime Minister took appropriate action not only to defend India’s security interests but also to help Tibet to the extent possible.

I hold the People’s Republic of China completely responsible and accountable for her acts of military aggression during 1950 and later in 1962. I find no reason to blame either Indian Prime Minister or Tibet for China’s misconduct.

I ask my readers to give attention to Indian support to Nationalist China during the concluding years of World War II. Apart from delivering weapons and military supplies to Nationalist China, the US with Indian assistance supplied weapons to Tibet prior to the Communist takeover of the mainland China. This military intervention in Tibet provided an excuse to Communist China to invade Tibet in 1950. I do not find fault with either India or Tibet. Their combined military power is not adequate to maintain the Balance of Power in South Asia. There is nothing wrong if weaker nations use diplomatic negotiations to resolve problems with stronger and powerful nations. It is indeed a practical and rational approach and I would not ridicule such attempts as an appeasement policy.

I uphold the valid concerns shared by India’s former Deputy Prime Minister, but I would not use his concerns to find fault with Prime Minister Nehru’s Foreign Policy Legacy. India has not yet changed the course of the foreign policy direction set up by Nehru.

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada

SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE

https://wholedude.com/2014/11/24/special-frontier-force-the-nehru-legacy/

The Nehru Legacy. The Cold War in Asia.

Opinion, Op Ed

Claude Arpi

The writer is based in South India for the past 40 years. He writes on India, China, Tibet, and Indo-French relations.

Patel-Nehru rift over Tibet & China was deep

Published Nov 8, 2018, 7:46 am IST

Updated Nov 8, 2018, 7:46 am IST

The most serious cause of discord was the invasion of Tibet by the Chinese “Liberation Army” in October 1950.

The Nehru Legacy. The Cold War in Asia.

On October 31, the world’s tallest statue, the Statue of Unity dedicated to Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel, was unveiled by Prime Minister Narendra Modi. (Photo: @narendramodi/Twitter)

On October 31, the world’s tallest statue, the Statue of Unity dedicated to Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel, was unveiled by Prime Minister Narendra Modi. The work on the 182-meter tall statue has been completed after round the clock work by 3,400 laborers and 250 engineers at Sadhu Bet island on Narmada river in Gujarat. Sadhu Bet, located some 3.5 km away from the Narmada Dam, is linked by a 250-meter-long long bridge.

Unfortunately, for several reasons, scarce scholarly research has been done on the internal history of the Congress; the main cause is probably that a section of the party would prefer to keep history under wraps. Take the acute differences of opinion between Sardar Patel, the deputy prime minister, and “Panditji”, as Nehru was then called by Congressmen. In the last weeks of Patel’s life (he passed away on December 15, 1950), there was a deep split between the two leaders, leading to unilateral decisions for the PM, for which India had to pay the heaviest price.

The most serious cause of discord was the invasion of Tibet by the Chinese “Liberation Army” in October 1950. In the course of recent researches in Indian archives, I discovered several new facts. Not only did several senior Congress leaders, led by Patel, violently oppose Nehru’s suicidal policy, but many senior bureaucrats too did not agree with the Prime Minister’s decisions and objected to his policy of appeasement with China, which led India to lose a peaceful border.
On November 11, 1950, the deputy prime minister of India addressed a meeting organized by the Central Aryan Association to commemorate the 67th death anniversary of Swami Dayanand Sarasvati. It was to be his last speech. What did he say? The Sardar spoke of the potential dangers arising from what was happening in Tibet and Nepal, and he exhorted his countrymen: “It was incumbent on the people to rise above party squabbles and unitedly defend their newly won freedom.” He cited the example of Gandhi and Swami Dayanand.

Sardar Patel then criticized the Chinese intervention in Tibet; he asserted that to use the “sword” against the traditionally peace-loving Tibetan people was unjustified: “No other country in the world was as peace-loving as Tibet. India did not believe, therefore, that the Chinese government would actually use force in settling the Tibetan question.” He observed that the Chinese government did not listen to India’s advice to settle the Tibetan issue peacefully: “They marched their armies into Tibet and explained this action by talking of foreign interests intriguing in Tibet against China.” The deputy prime minister added that this fear was unfounded; no outsider was interested in Tibet. The Sardar continued by saying that “nobody could say what the outcome of Chinese action would be. But the use of force ultimately created more fear and tension. It was possible that when a country got drunk with its own military strength and power, it did not think calmly over all issues.” He strongly asserted that the use of arms was wrong: “In the present state of the world, such events might easily touch off a new world war, which would mean disaster for mankind.”

Did he know that it was his last message? “Do not let cowardice cripple you. Do not run away from danger. The three-year-old freedom of the country has to be fully protected. India today is surrounded by all sorts of dangers and it is for the people today to remember the teachings of the two great saints and face fearlessly all dangers.”

The deputy prime minister concluded: “In this kalyug, we shall return ahimsa for ahimsa. But if anybody resorted to force against us, we shall meet it with force.” He ended his speech citing Swami Dayananda: “People should also remember that Swamiji did not get a foreign education. He was the product of Indian culture. Although it was true that they in India had to borrow whatever was good and useful from other countries, it was right and proper that Indian culture was accorded its due place.” Who is ready to listen to this, even today?

Days earlier, Patel had written a “prophetic” letter to Nehru, detailing the implications for India of Tibet’s invasion. In fact, Patel used a draft done by Sir Girja Shankar Bajpai, the secretary-general of the ministry of external affairs and Commonwealth relations. However, Nehru decided to ignore Patel’s letter.
Witnessing the nefarious influence of K.M. Panikkar, the Indian ambassador to China, who ceaselessly defended China’s interests, Bajpai, the most seasoned Indian diplomat, had lost his cool. On October 31, in an internal note, he detailed the sequence of events which followed Tibet’s invasion and the role of Panikkar, whose attitude was compared to Sir Neville Chamberlain’s towards Hitler.

Bajpai’s anger demonstrates the frustration of many senior officers; the account starts on July 15, when the governor of Assam informed Delhi that, according to the information received by the local intelligence bureau, Chinese troops, “in unknown strength, had been moving towards Tibet from three directions.” Not only was Panikkar unable to get any confirmation, but he virtually justified Beijing’s military action by writing: “In view of frustration in regard to Formosa, the Tibetan move was not unlikely.” During the next three months, the Indian ambassador would systematically take the Chinese side.

After receiving Bajpai’s note, Patel wrote back: “I need hardly say that I have read it with a great deal of interest and profit to myself and it has resulted in a much better understanding of the points at issue and general, though serious, nature of the problem. The Chinese advance into Tibet upsets all our security calculations. … I entirely agree with you that a reconsideration of our military position and a redisposition of our forces are inescapable.”

Some more details of the seriousness of the situation filter through Inside Story of Sardar Patel: The Diary of Maniben Patel, the daughter of the Sardar. In an entry on November 2, 1950, Maniben wrote: “Rajaji and Jawaharlal had a heated altercation about the Tibet policy. Rajaji does not at all appreciate this policy. Rajaji very unhappy — Bapu (Patel) did not speak at all.”

Later in the afternoon, “Munshi complained about Tibet policy. The question concerns the whole nation — said he had written a personal letter to Panditji on Tibet.”

Later, Patel told K.M. Munshi: “Rajaji, you (Munshi), I (Patel), Baldev Singh, (C.D.) Deshmukh, Jagjivan Ram, and even Sri Prakash are on one side, while Gopalaswamy, Rafi, Maulana (Azad) are on his side.” There was a vertical split in the Cabinet, and it was not only about Tibet. The situation would deteriorate further during the following weeks.

On December 12, Patel was divested on his portfolios. Nehru wrote: “In view of Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel’s ill-health it is absolutely necessary that he should have complete rest and freedom from worry, so as to be able to recuperate as rapidly as possible. …no work should be sent to him and no references made to him in regard to the work of these ministries.”

Gopalaswami Ayyangar, from the “other side”, was allotted the ministry of states and Nehru kept the ministry of home. The Sardar was only informed after the changes were made. He was a dejected man. Three days later he passed away.

Tags: Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel, Jawaharlal Nehru

Copyright © 2015 – 2018 Deccan Chronicle.

The Nehru Legacy. The Cold War in Asia.

 

 

 

THE DALAI LAMA LIFE CYCLE – MAN vs NATURE

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THE DALAI LAMA LIFE CYCLE – MAN vs NATURE

The Dalai Lama Life Cycle. Man vs Nature.

In my analysis, Tibetan Identity is created by Nature and man entered Tibet later to inherit the Identity. The Dalai Lama Life Cycle is consistent with Nature as the succession is not influenced by man. The People’s Republic of China wants to firmly intervene in any mechanism that Tibetans choose to determine the succession of the Dalai Lama. In fact, the Vatican most recently agreed to give China a role in the selection of Archbishops of the Chinese Catholic Church.

The Dalai Lama Life Cycle. Man vs Nature.

In my view, Natural Forces, Natural Causes, Natural Factors, Natural Conditions, and Natural Mechanisms will continue to play the most significant role in preserving the Tibetan Identity created by Nature. If not Plate Tectonics, Bolide Collision will decide Tibetan Destiny to reverse China’s Iron Fist Rule over Tibet.

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada

SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE

https://bhavanajagat.com/2015/04/22/doomsayer-of-doom-dooma-beijing-is-doomed/

Dalai Lama: Successor could be chosen via the method similar to the selection of the pope

Clipped from: https://mainichi.jp/english/articles/20181105/p2a/00m/0na/031000c

The Dalai Lama Life Cycle. Man vs Nature.

DHARAMSALA, India — The Dalai Lama, the exiled supreme leader of Tibetan Buddhism, said Nov. 5 that the selection of his successor could be done in a way the pope is selected by the Catholic Church in an election by cardinals.

“The kind of pope system is … possible to choose among the high lama or high scholars,” the 83-year-old Dalai Lama said in an interview with the Mainichi Shimbun and other media outlets. He said naming his successor by himself is “also possible,” explaining that there were some precedents of past leaders making selections while they were still alive.

Finding his “reincarnation” after his death — like what was said to have happened with the second Dalai Lama and other leaders — would be another way of choosing his successor, he said. If this method is not chosen, said the Dalai Lama, “When I become very old … I will ask if they want to keep the way to choose the next Dalai Lama.” He added it is “up to the Tibetan people” whether the institution of the Dalai Lama should continue or not.

As for his health, the Dalai Lama said he was diagnosed with cancer two years ago but it was cured after radiation therapy.

Tibet is controlled by China, and religious activities in the region including Buddhism are restricted by Beijing in an apparent bid to reduce the influence of the Dalai Lama and curb a potential separation movement.

Regarding the relationship with China, the Dalai Lama said he is not seeking independence. He said historically Tibet was an independent nation but “today for mutual benefit Tibet remains in the People Republic of China.”

The Dalai Lama Life Cycle. Man vs Nature.


BLESSINGS FOR PEACE – PRAYERS TO LHASA RIVER

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BLESSINGS FOR PEACE – PRAYERS TO LHASA RIVER

Blessings for Peace. Prayers to Lhasa River.

I offer my prayers to Lhasa River to receive the Blessings of Peace in Occupied Tibet.

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada

SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE

https://wholedude.com/2018/07/03/living-tibetan-spirits-offer-prayers-to-mount-kailash/

Reed flowers are seen in Wetland, Tibet

Clipped from: http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/a/201811/05/WS5bdfbc0da310eff30328695a_6.html

Blessings for Peace. Prayers to Lhasa River.

Photo taken on Nov 4, 2018, shows reed flowers in a wetland in Qushui county of Lhasa, Tibet. [Photo/Xinhua]

Blessings for Peace. Prayers to Lhasa River.

Photo taken on Nov 4, 2018, shows reed flowers in a wetland in Qushui county of Lhasa, Tibet. [Photo/Xinhua]

Blessings for Peace. Prayers to Lhasa River.

Photo taken on Nov 4, 2018, shows reed flowers in a wetland in Qushui county of Lhasa, Tibet. [Photo/Xinhua]

Blessings for Peace. Prayers to Lhasa River.

Photo taken on Nov 4, 2018, shows reed flowers in a wetland in Qushui county of Lhasa, Tibet. [Photo/Xinhua]

Blessings for Peace. Prayers to Lhasa River.

Photo taken on Nov 4, 2018, shows reed flowers in a wetland in Qushui county of Lhasa, Tibet. [Photo/Xinhua]

Blessings for Peace. Prayers to Lhasa River.

Photo taken on Nov 4, 2018, shows reed flowers in a wetland in Qushui county of Lhasa, Tibet. [Photo/Xinhua]

Blessings for Peace. Prayers to Lhasa River.


BLESSINGS OF PEACE – MY PRAYERS TO LHASA RIVER

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Prayers to Lhasa River
My Prayers to the Mother River of Tibet.
My Prayers to the River of Happiness.
My Prayers to Kyi-chu River.
My Prayers to Holy River of Tibet.
My Prayers to Lhasa River.
Lhasa, Potala und Medizinberg von Osten. My Prayers to Lhasa River.
My Prayers to Lhasa River.
My Prayers to Lhasa River.
My Prayers to Lhasa River.
My Prayers to Lhasa River.
My Prayers to Lhasa River.

 

 

THE DALAI LAMA LIFE CYCLE – THE CYCLICAL FLOW OF TIMES

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THE DALAI LAMA LIFE CYCLE – THE CYCLICAL FLOW OF TIMES

The Dalai Lama Life Cycle. The Cyclical Flow of Times.

The photo images that capture the physical appearance of the 14th Dalai Lama may relate to just one stage of the Dalai Lama Life Cycle. As per Tibetan faith and belief, the 14th Dalai Lama is the reincarnation of the 13th Dalai Lama. The Dalai Lama Life Cycle started in 1391 centuries before their individual lifespans.

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada

SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE

https://wholedude.com/2015/08/24/tibet-awareness-potala-palace-lhasa-tibet/

The Dalai Lama Life Cycle. The Cyclical Flow of Times.

Frame by frame: Photographer Raghu Rai’s book on the 14th Dalai Lama is personal, deep and immersive

Clipped from: https://bangaloremirror.indiatimes.com/opinion/sunday-read/frame-by-frame-photographer-raghu-rais-book-on-the-14th-dalai-lama-is-personal-deep-and-immersive/articleshow/66492014.cms

The Dalai Lama Life Cycle. The Cyclical Flow of Times.

Dalai Lama

By Priyadarshini Nandy

Raghu Rai’s book captures the many shades of the Tibetan spiritual leader

Raghu Rai’s latest book – A God in Exile: The Fourteenth Dalai Lama – focuses entirely on the Dalai Lama in his various moods and moments – be it when he’s interacting with his followers or simply unwinding. The series of black and white photographs are in no particular order, but it gives readers a glimpse into the life of the spiritual leader that Rai has witnessed over three decades. “He has an aura about him, one that can probably be felt for kilometers around him. He can see through you. We are truly lucky to have him in our lives. To me, he is a rare individual,” Rai adds.

But the two weren’t always so familiar. Before meeting the Dalai Lama in 1975, Rai’s knowledge of the man was pretty much limited to a book. “I had read My Land, My People (the Dalai Lama’s autobiography). It’s one of the most understated books I’d read in a while. Powerful, and moving – it sort of makes you feel responsible towards the people of Tibet. I knew that he was their spiritual leader, someone who brings out the Buddha in you… and that was pretty much it,” Rai says.

All that was going to change, when Rai was sent to Ladakh by The Statesman, to cover a three-day teaching session by the Dalai Lama. Little did Rai know back then that his relationship with the Dalai Lama was going to deepen over the years, and turn into a long-lasting friendship.

He (the Dalai Lama) has an aura about him, one that can probably be felt for kilometers around him. He can see through you. We are truly lucky to have him in our lives

Raghu Rai

“After ’75, I met him next only a decade later. I have been wanting to do a book on the Tibetans in exile, and I followed him to Bodh Gaya. But when I reached, I was informed that he was busy with a personal ritual and no one was allowed to disturb him. But I am adamant. I told them I knew him, and I simply must see him. After great difficulty, I was shown to his tent but was told not to enter. I had to insert my camera lens through a gap in the tent to take his photograph. But he spotted me and recognized me. He asked me to come in, and I was allowed to take his photos.

I was there for about four-five days and given complete access,” Rai adds.

The Dalai Lama Life Cycle. The Cyclical Flow of Times.

Being blessed at Judah Hymn Synagogue, wearing a yarmulke

The end result was Tibet in Exile (1990), with text by Jane Perkins (who’s also written for the current book) – a brilliant visual record of the Dalai Lama and the Tibetans who live in exile.

Over time, Rai kept going back to Dharamsala to meet the Dalai Lama.

“I did assignments for various magazines, and every time I went there, I would tell him it was really important. It was gracious of him to give me complete access, and he would even introduce me as his friend.” Sharing an old story, Rai says that during one of his shoots at Dharamsala, His Holiness came out from one his prayers, and gave him an off-white stone just before Rai was leaving. “I took it and put it into my camera bag. Many years later, my health worsened. I would feel uneasy and breathless; tired during assignments. What I did then was, taken that stone out and saw there was a small hole in it. I strung a thread to it and began to wear it around my neck. And I went back to work. In the year 2000, Nita (Rai’s wife) decided enough was enough and took me to a doctor. I was told that my heart had 90 per cent blockages, and anything could happen at any moment. I would like to believe that the stone is what protected me. I had an open-heart surgery later and my wife and I decided to go to Dharamsala to thank the Dalai Lama. But when I did thank him and told him how his stone had saved my life he laughed and said, “I don’t think I can do these things”. However, he pulled me into a prolonged embrace before we left, and I felt a kind of energy that I had never felt before. I think he just heals you by instinct. He can feel and smell what’s going on in your life.”

The Dalai Lama Life Cycle. The Cyclical Flow of Times.

His Holiness’s morning occupation is often rereading Tibetan scriptures

Rai has many such stories to share – about the small jokes the Dalai Lama would crack ever so often; how he would sit in meditation for hours when no one could move him; the way he would interact with the people who had come to take his blessing – and these stories have made their way to this black and white photobook. “I have seen the spiritual connection he has with things. I have seen his compassion. And I have seen his humorous side. Once, I went to photograph him when he was sitting with a group of southeast Asian monks. It was a serious moment. And yet, in the middle of that, he spotted me and asked me why was I wearing a cap. He then asked me to come up to him and tugged at my cap and said “I want to see how much hair you have left”, and began to laugh. And with him, so did everyone. He’s like that – childlike and innocent,” Rai adds.

Interestingly, A God in Exile was not something Rai had planned. “I had seen a book on him by the Swiss photographer Manuel Bauer, and I was jealous. The photographs in the book were amazing. I honestly felt as if someone had stolen my sweetheart from me.

The Dalai Lama Life Cycle. Photographer Raghu Rai.

Raghu Rai

So I told myself that even I would do a book, and mine would be better. So in 2016, I decided to put my collection of photographs of the Dalai Lama together. I think I can say that my book is now the best one,” Rai says with a laughter.

– Photographs From A God in Exile: The Fourteenth Dalai Lama, by Raghu Rai. Published by Roli Books

The Dalai Lama Life Cycle. The Cyclical Flow of Times. The Great 5th Dalai Lama.

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NEW REPORT ON TIBET – ONCE BITTEN TWICE SHY

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NEW REPORT ON TIBET – ONCE BITTEN, TWICE SHY

New Report on Tibet – Once Bitten, Twice Shy

The Department of Information and International Relations (DIIR) of Central Tibetan Administration (CTA) released a new report on Tibet titled ‘Tibet Was not Part of China But Middle Way Remains a Viable Solution’.

New Report on Tibet – Once Bitten, Twice Shy. Tibet’s attempt to secure meaningful autonomy on May 23, 1951, was disastrous.

But, we tried this Middle Way Approach on May 23, 1951, with disastrous consequences. As the saying goes, “Once Bitten, Twice Shy” Tibet cannot afford to bite the Bullet twice. Communist China insists that she has the right to control the Reincarnation of the Dalai Lama. The discussion about ‘Meaningful Autonomy’ has become redundant for Chinese Colonization of Tibet includes total Subjugation of all Social and Political Institutions of Tibet that give “Meaning” to Tibetan Identity.

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada

SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE

https://wholedude.com/2015/06/09/the-evil-red-empire-red-china-subjugator-of-tibet/

New report on Tibet highlights self-immolations, reincarnation of Dalai Lama

Clipped from: https://www.newkerala.com/news/read/63436/new-report-on-tibet-highlights-self-immolations-reincarnation-of-dalai-lama.html

Oct 31, 2018

IANS

New Report on Tibet – Once Bitten, Twice Shy.

New Delhi, Oct 30: From incidents of self-immolations, human rights, cultural genocide to the history of Tibet’s status and reincarnation of His Holiness the Dalai Lama — a new report released on Tuesday highlights the contemporary and prevalent issues faced by Tibet.

The report titled ‘Tibet Was Never A Part Of China But The Middle Way Approach Remains a Viable Solution’ was launched by the Department of Information and International Relations (DIIR) of Central Tibetan Administration (CTA).

The report, organized into nine chapters, covers self-immolations, human rights, cultural genocide, the history of Tibet’s status, the environment, urbanization, economic development, the reincarnation of His Holiness the Dalai Lama, and the Middle Way Policy.

“The chapters aim to be comprehensive but digestible. Given that each topic could be a book of its own, the report serves as an overview of the most pressing issues in Tibet for those involved with or interested in the Tibetan cause,” DIIR’s Information Secretary Dhardon Sharling said during the launch of the report.

Published in Tibetan, English and Chinese languages, the report was unveiled by Prof. Anand Kumar and Dr Lobsang Sangay, President, Central Tibetan Administration here.

“For Tibetans, information is a precious commodity. Severe restrictions on expression accompanied by a relentless disinformation campaign engender facts, knowledge and truth to become priceless. This has long been the case with Tibet. This report marks the CTA’s current contribution to this effort,” said CTA President Dr Lobsang Sangay.

New Report on Tibet – Once Bitten, Twice Shy.