Supreme Ruler of Tibet

THE 14th DALAI LAMA – THE SUPREME RULER OF TIBET LIVING IN EXILE

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THE 14th DALAI LAMA – THE SUPREME RULER OF TIBET LIVING IN EXILE

The Official Enthronement Ceremony of the 14th Dalai Lama in Lhasa.

I am pleased to share the photo images of the 14th Dalai Lama living in exile.

All photographs are part of the book, ‘A God in Exile: The Fourteenth Dalai Lama by Raghu Rai’, published by Roli Books.

The BBC News shared these photo images describing the Dalai Lama as a ‘spiritual leader’. Photographer and author Raghu Rai went a step further in recognizing the Dalai Lama as “A GOD IN EXILE.”

In my analysis, the relevance of the 14th Dalai Lama relates to the Institution of Dalai Lama that governs Tibet giving a sense of reality to the Tibetan Living Experience. If the Dalai Lama is just a Spiritual Leader, he would not be living in exile. If the Dalai Lama is indeed a ‘GOD’, Communist China would have utterly failed in crushing the massive Tibetan Uprising of March 1959.

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada

SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE

https://bhavanajagat.com/2018/09/02/the-white-house-of-supreme-ruler-of-tibet/

The 14th Dalai Lama. The Supreme Ruler of Tibet living in exile.

The Dalai Lama: Intimate portrait of a spiritual leader – BBC News

Clipped from: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-india-45585890

The 14th Dalai Lama. The Supreme Ruler of Tibet living in exile.

Image copyright Raghu Rai Image caption The Dalai Lama watching the TV series, Mahabharata

A new book by acclaimed Indian photographer Raghu Rai offers an unprecedented glimpse into the life of one of the world’s leading religious figures.

A God In Exile is the result of a photographer’s decades-long insight into his muse. Rai took his first picture of the iconic Tibetan spiritual leader in 1975.

He recalled being stopped by the Dalai Lama’s security. “I somehow managed to make eye contact with His Holiness and asked him if I could take some photos of him. He smiled and said yes,” Rai told the BBC.

Over the years, he has photographed the Dalai Lama many times and has cultivated a “deep friendship”.

In March 1959, as Chinese troops crushed an attempted uprising in Tibet, the 14th Dalai Lama, who was born Tenzin Gyatso, fled into India. He was then a young man in his mid-20s.

The 14th Dalai Lama. The Supreme Ruler of Tibet living in exile.

Image copyright Raghu Rai

The Indian government granted him asylum and he settled in the northern town of Dharamshala. About 80,000 Tibetans followed him into exile, most of whom settled in the same area.

The 14th Dalai Lama. The Supreme Ruler of Tibet living in exile.

Image copyright Raghu Rai

Thronged by Tibetan worshippers and tourists, the Dalai Lama is seen in the above image blessing a woman at a ceremony.

“When he sees his Tibetans, my god! You should see his eyes! It’s like a grandfather doting on his grandchildren,” Rai says.

In 2014, Rai decided to curate the hundreds of photos he had taken of the Dalai Lama and compile them into a book – a project which, he said, has been in the making for 40 years.

· The ancient wisdom the Dalai Lama hopes will enrich the world

·

The 14th Dalai Lama. The Supreme Ruler of Tibet living in exile.

Image copyright Raghu Rai

Many of the photos in the collection capture the Dalai Lama in candid moments, giving us an intimate glimpse into his everyday life.

“He loves to play with animals – I was waiting for him one day when he suddenly showed up with a cat,” Rai says.

The 14th Dalai Lama. The Supreme Ruler of Tibet living in exile.

Image copyright Raghu Rai

Rai also captured scenes from the Dalai Lama’s 80th birthday celebrations in 2015 at home in Dharamshala.

He hosted his siblings, including his older brother, Gyalo Thondup (pictured above), whom he introduced to guests as a “troublemaker”.

The book’s preface, written by Rai, offers readers an account of his interactions with the Dalai Lama.

“He left an indelible impression on me – gentle, gracious, humble and full of wonder. It is peculiar to say such a thing, but I got the strange yet pleasant feeling of being equals, despite his position. In hindsight, I realise it was because His Holiness behaved with such unfeigned kindness and lack of vanity.”

The 14th Dalai Lama. The Supreme Ruler of Tibet living in exile.

Image copyright Raghu Rai

Many images in the book feature the Dalai Lama performing innocuous chores such as repairing his TV or gardening in his home – tasks that he always did himself, Rai says.

The 14th Dalai Lama. The Supreme Ruler of Tibet living in exile.

Image copyright Raghu Rai

“In a lot of ways, he gave me everything a photographer ever wants from a subject,” the photographer says.

The 14th Dalai Lama. The Supreme Ruler of Tibet living in exile.

Image copyright Raghu Rai

Among the Dalai Lama’s favorite places at his home is the garden, where he grows all sorts of plants.

All photographs are part of the book, ‘A God in Exile: The Fourteenth Dalai Lama by Raghu Rai’, published by Roli Books.

The 14th Dalai Lama. The Supreme Ruler of Tibet living in exile.
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THE POPE’S JUDAS KISS TO SEAL THE DEAL WITH COMMUNIST CHINA

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THE POPE’S JUDAS KISS TO SEAL THE DEAL WITH COMMUNIST CHINA

The Pope’s Judas Kiss to Seal the Deal with Communist China.

In my analysis, the Vatican deal with Communist China represents an act of betrayal. Pope Francis betrayed Jesus Christ to permit Communist China a role in the selection of Archbishops for Catholic Churches in China.

The Living Tibetan Spirits would not expect His Holiness the Dalai Lama to walk in the footsteps of Pope Francis to forsake his faith to save the Dalai Lama Institution of Tibet.

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada

SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE

The Pope’s Judas Kiss to Seal the Deal with Communist China.

The Pope has kissed and made up with China. Can the Dalai Lama?

The Pope’s Judas Kiss to Seal the Deal with Communist China.

Pope Francis has pulled off a landmark deal by getting Beijing to recognize the Vatican’s influence – and his approach may impart valuable lessons to the Dalai Lama, should there be any hope for reconciliation with Tibet on the cards

By Sourabh Gupta

28 Sep 2018

Clipped from: https://www.scmp.com/week-asia/geopolitics/article/2166226/pope-has-made-china-can-dalai-lama

Pope Francis has pulled off a landmark deal by getting Beijing to recognize the Vatican’s influence – and his approach may impart valuable lessons to the Dalai Lama, should there be any hope for reconciliation with Tibet on the cards

The Pope’s Judas Kiss to Seal the Deal with Communist China.

The Dalai Lama must make his peace with an antithetical political authority and persevere in good faith. Photo: Reuters

The reigning Bishop of Rome, Francis, is not your typical stodgy pontiff. In the five short years since his elevation as the first non-European head of the Roman Catholic Church since 741 AD, he has displayed latitude of mind, the courage of conviction, and deftness of diplomatic skill that is rare even among statesmen.

In August 2014, on entering Chinese airspace during a flight to Seoul, he broke six decades of silence between the Vatican and the head of China’s government by posting a message of goodwill to President Xi Jinping. Fittingly, on his birthday later that December, talks brokered by Francis were announced that would in time lead to the normalization of ties between the Castro regime in Cuba and the Obama administration. The US-Cuba agreement was signed at the Vatican Secretariat of State. In February 2016, almost a thousand years after the rupture of the Eastern and Western branches of Christianity, Pope Francis held the first meeting with his Russian Orthodox counterpart, Patriarch Kirill, in Havana. Francis’ millennia-spanning achievements are not one for the faint-hearted.

Last week, Pope Francis registered his biggest diplomatic breakthrough yet: a landmark agreement with the government of the People’s Republic on the ordination of bishops in China. As per the agreement, Beijing – 67 years after snapping ties with the Vatican – will formally recognize the Pope’s jurisdiction as the head of the Catholic Church in China as well as the final authority in deciding on candidates for bishops in the country.

The Chinese Catholic Patriotic Association (CCPA), the “self-run Church” hitherto established and controlled by the state, is to be downgraded and reoriented. In exchange, Pope Francis is expected to lift the excommunications of seven CCPA-installed bishops and formally recognize them as the leaders of their dioceses. More broadly, a mechanism that enables Beijing to provide its acceptable slate of candidates and the Vatican to have a final say in selection will now be formalized.

The fate of the three dozen or so Vatican-approved prelates, some of whom are in prison, who are not recognized by the CCPA is unclear at this time. The larger hope, though, is that as the splintering of the Catholic Church in China is reversed, the churches above and underground will in time be reconciled. Perhaps, a papal visit could be on the cards, too.

The Pope’s Judas Kiss to Seal the Deal with Communist China.

Pope Francis’ list of achievements span millennia of history. Photo: AFP

Both sides stand to gain handsomely from the compromise. For the Vatican, its pre-eminence on all matters ecclesiastical in the sovereign territorial space of China has been formally confirmed for the first time by the communist government in Beijing. For the Chinese Communist Party, its overarching and “guiding” role in harnessing religious belief to “help social harmony, modernization [and a] healthy civilization” – a key principle of its post-1980s religious policy – is vindicated without having to cede (though having to share) control on key decision-making to an entity that is housed beyond its sovereign territorial space.

Now, if the Vatican can pull off a deal with Beijing, what about the Dalai Lama? As plausible as it may look in theory, the ramifications for the Tibetan Buddhist leader are more profound. And the bottom line is equally stark: while Beijing could in theory share, it will never cede control over key Tibetan Buddhism-related personnel matters, notably the recognition of tulkus (or “living Buddhas”), as long as the Dalai Lama remains in exile. And given that the Dalai Lama is double-hatted in Tibet’s theocratic political structure as its secular leader over a defined territorial space (unlike the Pope), it is all the more likely that Beijing will refuse to share – let alone cede – practical control over key personnel matters until the Dalai Lama returns to Tibet.

The failed effort in arriving at a consensual selection of a new Panchen Lama in the mid-1990s holds cautionary lessons. Following the untoward death of the revered lama in 1989, Beijing announced a search, selection and recognition process for his successor that initially ruled out a role for the Dalai Lama. Convinced otherwise by resident high lamas, Beijing reversed course in due time and accepted the involvement of the Dalai Lama in principle – if only to rubber-stamp its anointed choice.

By 1995, however, Beijing allegedly went so far as to turn a blind eye to a slate of candidates that it’s officially sanctioned search party (headed by a respected lama from Shigatse) had clandestinely submitted to the Dalai Lama for his prior approval. The process broke down in May that year, following the Dalai Lama’s fait accompli announcement of a young boy from northwest Tibet as the reincarnation of the 10th Panchen Lama.

The Pope’s Judas Kiss to Seal the Deal with Communist China.

The Vatican’s China deal has profound ramifications for the Tibetan Buddhist leader. Photo: Getty

Beijing’s essential bottom line remained consistent throughout while the prerogative of the Dalai Lama could be acknowledged and religious authority shared, akin to the China-Vatican accord, the overarching guiding role over religion in sovereign Tibetan territory rested ultimately with Beijing.

Four hundred years ago, the great Qing dynasty emperor, Kangxi – a patron of Jesuit cartography, astronomy and engineering – had insisted that Chinese rites of ancestor worship and public homage to Confucius, being civil rather than religious practices, should continue to be practiced by his converted Christian subjects. Conflating Kangxi’s injunction with an intrusion on the paramountcy of church doctrine, Pope Clement XI forbade Catholic missionaries from following the Emperor’s orders.

The episode did not end well for the Church. No less than China’s communist rulers today, the Kangxi Emperor refused to cede Beijing’s overarching guiding role over religion – and that too to an entity housed beyond its sovereign territorial space.

While one does not know if the Communist Party’s rule in Beijing will last as long the Qing dynasty’s multi-century reign, it is not about to disappear any time soon. The onus resides on the Dalai Lama’s shoulders to find a way to make peace and comity with Beijing – at least on matters that touch wholly and exclusively on Tibetan Buddhism. Dealing with the fraught issue of the limits of Tibet’s political and territorial autonomy is a different matter.

In March 2014, standing at the UNESCO headquarters in Paris, President Xi Jinping extolled the profound impact of Buddhism in China. If a monotheist leader from distant Latin America carrying the Catholic Church’s dubious historical baggage can arrive at a principled compromise with the leadership in Beijing, surely the Dalai Lama could – or should – be able to do better. But for that, the Dalai Lama must heed the lessons of Francis – foremost, make one’s peace with and accommodate an antithetical political authority and, secondarily, persevere in good faith to realize this accommodation. Is his Excellency listening?

Sourabh Gupta is a senior fellow at the Institute for China-America Studies in Washington

The Pope’s Judas Kiss to Seal the Deal with Communist China.

TIBET EQUILIBRIUM – THE BALANCE OF POWER – CHINA WANTS A PUPPET DALAI LAMA

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TIBET EQUILIBRIUM – THE BALANCE OF POWER – CHINA WANTS A PUPPET DALAI LAMA

Tibet Equilibrium. The Balance of Power. China Wants a Puppet Dalai Lama.

The Great Problem of Tibet cannot be resolved as Communist China demands a Dalai Lama it can control. China views Tibet as a Puppet Nation and wants the Dalai Lama to dance to the tune played in Beijing.

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada

SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE

https://wholedude.com/2016/06/25/future-of-tibet-hangs-in-the-balance/

Rare Tibet trip shows China only wants a Dalai Lama it can control

Clipped from: https://www.msn.com/en-gb/news/world/rare-tibet-trip-shows-china-only-wants-a-dalai-lama-it-can-control/ar-AAAEmjC?srcref=rss

Tibet Equilibrium. The Balance of Power. China Wants a Puppet Dalai Lama.

Luis Sinco/Los Angeles Times/TNS/File

The Dalai Lama greets members of the Vietnamese American community during the opening of Chua Dieu Ngu Buddhist temple in Westminster, Calif., on Saturday, June 18, 2016.

The Dalai Lama greets members of the Vietnamese American community during the opening of Chua Dieu Ngu Buddhist temple in Westminster, Calif., on Saturday, June 18, 2016.

BEIJING For three centuries, a succession of Tibetan spiritual and political leaders known as Dalai Lama ruled from a crimson-and-white castle overlooking the city of Lhasa.

The Potala Palace as it’s known was the start of a rare tour of Tibet last month. The Chinese foreign ministry and local government hosted international journalists on a trip to the mountainous region, and I was one of them.

While the Potala Palace still dominates Lhasa’s skyline, the current Dalai Lama hasn’t lived there since 1959, when the twenty-something fled to India as the People’s Liberation Army quashed a revolt against Chinese rule. In the six decades since, the question of his return has been a persistent source of tension between China and the West.

The Chinese government says the Dalai Lama can return only if he gives up any pretensions for an independent Tibet. The Dalai Lama and his supporters say they don’t seek independence but instead greater autonomy within China’s system, including an elected legislature and independent judicial system. Beijing rejects that claim as insincere.

But with the spiritual leader now 83, his return has also become a question of succession. In a move that could rile China’s ties with Western democracies, Beijing has begun laying out the case for why it should appoint the Dalai Lama’s successor instead of his exiled supporters in northern India.

It was a topic that came up frequently on our government-organized trip, which has long been the sole way foreign journalists could travel to Tibet the only part of China where written permission is required to visit. Such trips have also become rarer after a spate of self-immolations earlier this decade prompted tightened security. Beijing blames the Dalai Lama, who it says has fomented the unrest, while his followers and human-rights activists say the cause is government oppression.

Tibet stands out as the only Chinese area where ethnic Han Chinese are a small minority. Of the 3.2 million who live in the mountainous region, more than 90 percent are ethnic Tibetan. China’s total population of 1.4 billion, by contrast, is more than 90 percent Han.

In April, the U.S. State Department blasted China for “severe” repression in Tibet, including arbitrary detention, censorship and travel restrictions. It counted five incidences of self-immolation in 2017 a drop-off from 83 in 2012 and noted the arrest of Tibetans who speak with foreigners, particularly journalists.

The Potala Palace was the first of many stops in our packed itinerary, which also included visits to businesses, holy sites, an orphanage, the home of a herdsman, a school teaching traditional Thangka painting and interviews with various local authorities. At each stop, we were able to ask whatever we wanted as officials looked on.

At the Dalai Lama’s former residence, we saw pilgrims leaving offerings of money in the room where he once received guests. On the wall was a portrait of the 13th Dalai Lama, the predecessor of the current reincarnation.

While our questions about the Dalai Lama at the palace and other stops were mostly met with polite reticence, the reverence he still commands were noticeable. Several local officials said he’s still held in esteem by many as a spiritual leader.

The Potala Palace also holds the tombs of eight past Dalai Lama. The title passes from generation to generation through a process that selects successors in their childhood as reincarnations. Supporters of the current Dalai Lama fear that upon his death, there will be two claimants to the position: one selected by them and another by the Chinese government.

A similar power struggle played out with the Panchen Lama, the second-most prominent figure in Tibetan Buddhism. After the death of the 10th Panchen Lama in 1989, both the Chinese government and the Dalai Lama identified reincarnations. The man selected by Beijing is now a senior adviser to the nation’s parliament. The Dalai Lama’s choice hasn’t been seen in two decades, and his followers say he was abducted at the age of six.

His disappearance has become a political issue. In April, the U.S. State Department issued a statement marking his birthday and called on Chinese authorities to release him immediately, provoking a furious response from Beijing.

The Central Tibetan Administration, which represents the Dalai Lama’s followers in northern India, says the reincarnation of the Dalai Lama should be in the hands of Tibetan Buddhist leaders. “The Chinese government should not interfere in the religious practices of Tibetan Buddhism,” said spokesman Sonam Dagpo.

When we discussed this with officials our trip, they argued that there’s precedent for Beijing to be involved. The current Dalai Lama, they say, ascended to the position in 1939 after being approved by Chiang Kai-Shek, who was president of the Republic of China before the Communist Party took power in 1949.

They also said the Communist Party has done just fine running Tibet. Some data points they reeled off: The economy has seen double-digit growth in each of the last 25 years; average life expectancy doubled to 68.2 in 2017 from 32.7 years in 1959; and literacy is now more than 99 percent, up from about 2 percent in 1951.

Central government statistics show that Tibet’s average disposable income was about $5,300 last year. That’s less than the national average but higher than several other regions including Gansu and Heilongjiang in the north.

Signs of growth were evident on the ground. In Lhasa, where we spent most of our time, scores of buildings were under construction. Traffic is bad from morning until as late as 9 p.m. A BMW dealership had opened, as has an enormous JD.com Inc. warehouse.

Tibet’s problems under the Dalai Lama’s rule went beyond economics, said Luobu Dunzhu, the most-senior official we met on our trip. The 57-year-old executive vice chairman of Tibet’s regional government told our group that his parents were slaves in the feudal system the Dalai Lama headed and had no hope for an education or better lives. Tibetans don’t want to go back, he said.

“The Dalai Lama knew about all of these problems and didn’t do anything to solve them,” Luobu Dunzhu said. “It was the Communist Party that changed Tibet and that’s why the people support the party.”

The Dalai Lama’s followers in India say that economic growth has mainly benefited ethnic Han Chinese, and deny they want to reinstate the old feudal system. What they want, spokesman Dagpo said, is for Tibetans to be able to worship and travel freely, to carry photos of the Dalai Lama and to send their children to monasteries. A key problem with Chinese rules is that any advocacy for Tibetan rights is seen as a form of intolerable separatism, he said.

While we saw no signs of unrest during our trip, the concern about separatism was clear. Travelers flying into Lhasa have their identifications checked before they can exit the airport. Roads entering the capital are manned by police checkpoints. Foreign tourists need permission to visit, one official said, to prevent “bad guys” from sneaking in.

That concern was also discernible when we visited the Sera Monastery, which dates back to the 1400s and where monks died in fighting with Chinese troops during the 1959 uprising when the Dalai Lama fled Tibet.

The monks there still practice many of its oldest traditions, including debate sessions in which participants whirl in circles and slap their hands together. But there’s also been change. In addition to Buddhist scriptures, its library also carries copies of President Xi Jinping’s book, “The Governance of China.”

Suo Lang Ci Ren, a member of the Sera monastery’s management committee, articulated a view we heard from several religious figures one that Beijing may also like to hear from the next Dalai Lama.

“Loving your country and loving your religion,” he said, “are things a monk must do in parallel.”

(Iain Marlow and Xiaoqing Pi contributed to this report.)

Tibet Equilibrium. The Balance of Power. China Wants a Puppet Dalai Lama.

 

BLESSINGS OF PEACE AND LONG LIFE

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BLESSINGS OF PEACE AND LONG LIFE

Living Tibetan Spirits invoke the Blessings of Peace and Long Life of His Holiness the Dalai Lama.

Living Tibetan Spirits offer prayers invoking the blessings of peace and long life to His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama.

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada

SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE

Living Tibetan Spirits invoke the Blessings of Peace and Long Life of His Holiness the Dalai Lama.

WILL LIVE FOR 100 YEARS, SAYS DALAI LAMA

Clipped from: https://www.tribuneindia.com/news/himachal/will-live-for-100-years-says-dalai-lama/647688.html

Living Tibetan Spirits invoke the Blessings of Peace and Long Life of His Holiness the Dalai Lama.

The Dalai Lama speaks on the first day of his four-day teaching at the request of a group from South Asia at the main temple in McLeodganj on Tuesday. Photo: Kamaljeet

Tribune News Service

Dharamshala, September 4

Amid concerns regarding his health, Tibetan spiritual leader Dalai Lama said he would live around 100 years.

“With your prayers and wishes, I assure you I would live around 100 years,” said the Dalai Lama, addressing representatives of three regions of Tibet at Tsuglagkhang, the main temple in Dharamshala, yesterday. “I would serve the humanity,” he said.

Recently, news reports had raised concerns regarding the health of the Dalai Lama and suggesting that he was suffering from prostate cancer. However, later both the Dalai Lama and his personal physician declined the reports.

Tibetans representing Tibet’s three traditional provinces and Tibetans from Kalimpong, Gangtok, Darjeeling and Ravangla offered long life prayers to the Dalai Lama yesterday.

Thanking the participants and organizers for the ceremony, the Dalai Lama praised the 17 pandits of Nalanda for their logical way of teaching the Buddhism.

“The detailed explanation of the ancient Nalanda teachings has only been preserved in the Tibetan language which is why people from China are interested in learning the Buddhism,” said the Dalai Lama.

Speaking of the ancient Nalanda Buddhist teaching, he said the ancestors of Tibetans had well-preserved this knowledge which enabled Tibetans to get expertise in promoting the knowledge in their language. The Dalai Lama said it was the duty of the Tibetans to continue the practical teachings of the ancestors while, at the same time, taking pride in possessing such a vast knowledge.

“I respect all kinds of religious beliefs which only teach love and compassion as the ultimate source of human happiness,” he said.

Meanwhile, drawing the attention of the gathering, the Dalai Lama emphasized that the masters of Nalanda encouraged its followers to approach their teaching with logic and reason rather than following it blindly.

Living Tibetan Spirits invoke the Blessings of Peace and Long Life of His Holiness the Dalai Lama.

 

THE WHITE HOUSE OF SUPREME RULER OF TIBET

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THE WHITE HOUSE OF SUPREME RULER OF TIBET

The White House of Supreme Ruler of Tibet.

Living Tibetan Spirits present a guide to Potala Palace, Lhasa, Tibet. Potala Palace serves the same purpose as The White House of the US President. Potala is the Seat of Tibetan Government called The Dalai Lama Institution of Tibet.

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada

SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE

The White House of Supreme Ruler of Tibet.

A GUIDE TO POTALA PALACE, LHASA, TIBET

Clipped from: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/travel/destinations/asia/china/tibet-autonomous-region-lhasa-potala-palace-world-heritage/

//assets.nationalgeographic.com/modules-video/latest/assets/ngsEmbeddedVideo.html?guid=00000165-81e1-df80-affd-f1e5aba90000

video.nationalgeographic.com/video/travel-source/unesco-world-heritage-sites/180822-china-potala-palace-unesco-travel

Potala Palace is one of the most well-known spiritual sanctums in the world.

At 12,139 feet above sea level, Potala is the highest palace in the world. The 1,300-year-old structure was originally built as a gesture of love, commissioned by Tibetan king Songtsen Gambo for his marriage to Princess Wencheng of the Chinese Tang Dynasty. Eventually, monks came to rule Tibet and the palace was expanded and converted into the winter residence for the Dalai Lama. But when the Dalai Lama was exiled to India in 1959, the Chinese government took over and made the grounds into a museum.

Still, the Potala Palace remains an iconic part of the region and a mecca for Buddhists around the world. The name Potala is a nod to a sacred mountain in India, where the Buddha of compassion is said to dwell. Year-round, thousands of religious pilgrims circle the perimeter of the palace with prayer wheels and beads to ask for a blessing. Many have traveled thousands of miles by foot just to pay their respects.

With more than a thousand rooms, 10,000 painted scrolls, 698 murals, and thousands of exquisite statues made from precious alloys and jewels, the structure has become one of the most famous spiritual sanctums in the world. Inside are the tombs of eight Dalai Lamas, hundreds of sacred Buddhist scrolls, and numerous shrines. Butter lamps light the hallways and watchful monks are stationed in nearly every public room to ensure that decorum is maintained.

The building is divided into two sections—the Red Palace and the White Palace. The former serves as the religious section and the latter as the administrative area. They are literally colored red and white; a fresh coat of paint made up of milk, honey, and sugar is applied every autumn.

The Potala Palace was named a World Heritage site in 1994 by UNESCO, and the neighboring Jokhang Temple and Norbulingka and were added on as extensions in 2000 and 2001, respectively. The Jokhang Temple is considered the most sacred temple in Tibet and the Norbulingka was the former summer residence of the Dalai Lama. All three structures are outstanding embodiments of Tibetan culture and despite waves of natural and human-induced damage, they are international icons that have remained spiritually relevant and intact over the centuries.

HOW TO GET THERE

Fly into the Lhasa Gonggar Airport or take a train into the city. Visitors must obtain a Tibet Tourism Bureau permit through a local tour agency in advance (allow up to 14 days) to enter Tibet by plane or train.

HOW TO VISIT

All visitors must visit the Potala Palace with a tour group. Groups are allocated an hour inside the premises and photos are not allowed. While the palace and its adjacent temples are very much tourist attractions, many of the guests are Tibetan pilgrims who have come to the sacred sites to pray.

WHEN TO VISIT

As one of the highest cities in the world, Lhasa can get quite frosty during the winter. Summer is the best time to visit. June to August is peak tourist season.

The White House of Supreme Ruler of Tibet. These Tibetans are not pilgrims visiting the Potala Palace. They came to defend their Political Rights.

 

INSTITUTION OF DALAI LAMA REMAINS RELEVANT TO TIBETANS IN OCCUPIED TIBET

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INSTITUTION OF DALAI LAMA REMAINS RELEVANT TO TIBETANS IN OCCUPIED TIBET

The Institution of Dalai Lama stands for the Ganden Phodrang Government of Tibet which represents political rights of Tibetans for Self-Governance.

In my analysis, ‘Institution of Dalai Lama’ remains relevant to Tibetans in Occupied Tibet. The Institution of Dalai Lama represents The Ganden Phodrang Government of Tibet, the political symbol of Tibetan Rights to Self-Governance. The Seal that represents the Institution of Dalai Lama does not include the image of any of the Dalai Lamas that ruled over Tibet for centuries.

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada

SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE

DALAI LAMA SAYS, ‘INSTITUTION OF DALAI LAMA’ NO MORE POLITICALLY RELEVANT

Clipped from: https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/dalai-lama-says-institution-of-dalai-lama-no-more-politically-relevant/articleshow/65322625.cms

The Institution of Dalai Lama remains relevant to Tibetans in Occupied Tibet.

PANAJI: Tibetan spiritual leader Dalai Lama on Wednesday said the “institution of Dalai Lama” is no longer politically relevant and it was up to the people of Tibet to decide whether the age-old tradition should continue or not.

He said the Chinese government was more concerned about this institution than him for political reasons.

Dalai Lama is a title given to spiritual leaders of Tibetan people. This title is given to those who are considered among the most important monks of the Gelug school, the newest school of Tibetan Buddhism.

Addressing an event at the Goa Institute of Management, the 14th Dalai Lama said, “As early as in 1969, I had formally made a statement whether this very institution of Dalai Lama should continue or not, it is up to the Tibetan people to decide.”

Replying to students’ queries after an hour-long address, he said, “I have no concerns. Nowadays, the Chinese government is more concerned about the Dalai Lama institution than me. The Chinese government is concerned because of political reasons,”

During the 1959 Tibetan uprising, the Dalai Lama had fled to India.

He said in 2001, the elected political leadership was appointed (by the people in exile) and for the next 10 years, he remained in semi-retired position.
“Then in 2011, I totally retired from the political responsibility. Now, the elected political leadership carries the full responsibility, I don’t get involved in their decision,” he said.

“Now, no longer Dalai Lama institution is politically relevant,” the 1989 Nobel Peace Prize winner said.
About the future Dalai Lama, he said all leaders of different Buddhist traditions hold a meeting in Tibet every year in November.


“This November, we are meeting again. In the previous meetings, they had decided that when my age reaches around 90 years, then the group of leaders will decide about the future Dalai Lama,” the 83-year-old spiritual leader said.


When asked about his own selection to the chair, Lama recalled, “According to my mother, the very day when the search party set by the Tibetan government reached my place… That very day our family was completely ignorant.”


“But that very day, I was a 2-3-year-old boy… I was so much excited. I myself don’t know why… The search party got some indications that day. When they reached our house, I ran towards them and recognized each persons’ name,” he said.


“At that time, I had some sort of some memory about past life,” the Dalai Lama said.

SUPREME RULER OF TIBET CELEBRATES HIS 83rd BIRTHDAY IN LEH, LADAKH, INDIA

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SUPREME RULER OF TIBET CELEBRATES HIS 83rd BIRTHDAY IN LEH, LADAKH, INDIA

 
 

On Friday, July 06, 2018 Living Tibetan Spirits greet His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama on his 83rd birthday to acknowledge him as Supreme Ruler of Tibet. For Tibetans, the title Dalai Lama is all about rulership and governance of Tibet. No other institution of government can replace Supreme Ruler of Tibet during his lifetime.

 
 

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada

SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE

HIS HOLINESS THE DALAI LAMA CUTS A CAKE ON HIS 83rd BIRTHDAY

Clipped from: http://www.ptcnews.tv/his-holiness-the-dalai-lama-cuts-a-cake-on-his-83rd-birthday/

His Holiness the Dalai Lama cuts a cake on his 83rd birthday

His Holiness the Dalai Lama cuts a cake on his 83rd birthday

Tibetan spiritual leader His Holiness The Dalai Lama turned 83 on Friday. Special prayers were held in Ladakh, Jammu and Kashmir for the long life.

Large crowds donning traditional dresses began to assemble since morning at the Shewatsel Phodrang complex on the outskirts of Leh for the celebrations. Tibetan Prime Minister Lobsang Sangay also attended the celebrations here.

The Dalai Lama, revered by the Tibetans as a “living god”, attended the prayers and cut the cake on his birthday.

“This time again His Holiness decided to celebrate his birthday with the people of Leh,” said a spokesperson for the Dalai Lama’s office.

“I am very happy to be here once more,” the spiritual leader told the gathering on reaching here on Tuesday.

“I seem to be physically fit and if that continues I hope to spend some time here, avoiding the monsoon on the plains. You people of Ladakh have a special bond with me based on your faith and loving-kindness, of which I am very appreciative,” he added.

Born on July 6, 1935, at Taktser hamlet in northeastern Tibet, the Dalai Lama was recognized at the age of two as the reincarnation of the 13th Dalai Lama, Thubten Gyatso.

The Dalai Lama was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1989 for his non-violent campaign for democracy and freedom in his homeland.

-PTC News