Beijing Doomed

DOOMED PRESIDENT GERALD FORD’S FRATERNITY HOUSE BUILDING DISCOVERS REDEEMER

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DOOMED PRESIDENT GERALD FORD’S FRATERNITY HOUSE BUILDING DISCOVERS REDEEMER

DOOMED PRESIDENT GERALD FORD’S FRATERNITY BUILDING DISCOVERS REDEEMER. DKE ‘SHANT’ BUILDING AT 611 1/2 EAST. WILLIAM STREET, ANN ARBOR OBTAINED NEW LEASE ON LIFE.

I speak of Doomed Presidency of Nixon-Kissinger and Gerald R. Ford in the context of Doomed US Policy they initiated and followed. US Policy doomed for it fundamentally violates values cherished by Founding Members who enshrined those Principles in ‘Declaration of Independence’ to establish USA as Free Nation.

The historical legacy of Doomed Nixon-Kissinger and Ford Presidency trapped my life and military career since 1971. I left India in 1984 in search of ‘REDEEMER’ or ‘DISCOVERER’ to find the true purpose in my life.

DOOMED PRESIDENT GERALD FORD’S FRATERNITY HOUSE BUILDING DISCOVERS REDEEMER TO GET NEW LEASE ON LIFE.

My readers may not be surprised to note my interest in a story published by MLive.com giving account of historic DKE Shant Building at 611 ½ East William Street, Ann Arbor. Delta Kappa Epsilon Fraternity is not able to use this Building for their activities and listed it for lease. To my utter surprise, this Doomed Building used by Gerald R. Ford is discovered by ‘REDEEMER ANN ARBOR’ Church for their Worship Service. This historic Building got a new tenant to keep its life. The Story gives me Hope of reaching my true destination in life with guidance from my personal REDEEMER.

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada

DOOM DOOMA DOOMSAYER

MLive.com

Historic DKE Shant building on Ann Arbor’s William Street listed for lease for retail user

Doomed President Gerald Ford’s Fraternity House Building Discovers Redeemer to get New Lease on Life. Delta Kappa Epsilon Fraternity House, Shant at 611 1/2 East William Street, Ann Arbor.
Doomed President Ford’s Fraternity House Building in Ann Arbor.
Doomed President Ford’s Fraternity House Building in Ann Arbor Discovers Redeemer.

 

 

 

 

 

Doomed President Gerald Ford’s Fraternity House Building in Ann Arbor Discovers Redeemer.                                       
Doomed President Ford’s Fraternity House Building Discovers Redeemer.
Doomed President Ford’s Fraternity House Building in Ann Arbor Discovers Redeemer.
Doomed President Ford’s Fraternity House Building in Ann Arbor Discovers Redeemer.
Doomed President Ford’s Fraternity House Building in Ann Arbor Discovers Redeemer.
Doomed President Ford’s Fraternity House Building Discovers Redeemer.
Doomed President Ford’s Fraternity House Building in Ann Arbor.
Doomed President Ford’s Fraternity House Building in Ann Arbor Discovers Redeemer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Shant building, which is owned by the Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity and located at 611 1/2 E. William St. is up for lease. Melanie Maxwell | The Ann Arbor News

Melanie Maxwell | melaniemaxwell@mlive.com

By Lizzy Alfs | lizzyalfs@mlive.com

on October 02, 2014 at 5:25 AM

Set behind a seven-foot brick wall and a padlocked cast-iron gate in downtown Ann Arbor is an unusual historic building in transition.

After serving as a space for weekly Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity rituals and later, as the international headquarters for the fraternity, the 135-year-old building at 611 1/2 E. William St. is listed for lease for a retail user.

The building is located between Hunter House Hamburgers and Tianchu Restaurant.

An online real estate listing markets the building, known as the Shant, as the “most unique building on the University of Michigan campus,” noting it’s “the first time the property has been offered to the public.” The 2,000-square-foot space is listed for lease with Colliers International Ann Arbor for an annual $35 per square foot.

“Very rare opportunity for retail coffee shop or similar uses for very unique original space on campus,” the listing says.

Listing broker Jim Chaconas described the Shant as “the building that everybody wants to know.”

A long-time fixture near campus

The Shant sticks out in its surroundings – an evolving near-campus retail area – although it’s set back from the sidewalk and behind a tall brick wall. The building has retained its historic character as the area around it continues to develop.

Doomed President Ford’s Fraternity House Building in Ann Arbor Discovers Redeemer to get New Lease on Life.

The historic Shant building is located on a narrow lot at 611 1/2 E. William St. Ben Freed | The Ann Arbor News 

The Shant has a rich history in Ann Arbor; architect William Le Baron Jenney, later known as the “father of the American skyscraper,” designed the building for the Omicron Chapter of DKE at U-M. Jenney taught the university’s first courses in architecture.

The cornerstone for the chapter hall on East William Street was laid in 1878 and construction finished the following year.

As for the building’s name, people aren’t quite certain where it comes from.

“Nobody really knows,” said Sarah Christensen, DKE’s administrative director.

Designed in thirteenth century French style, the two-story building features a stone foundation, intricate wood arches, a vaulted ceiling and stained glass windows with the DKE symbol.

Doomed President Ford’s Fraternity House Building in Ann Arbor Discovers Redeemer to get New Lease on Life.

A historic photo of the Shant shows the building before 1901, when the brick wall was constructed to keep people off the property. Photo courtesy of the Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan 

When the building was completed, it was used for weekly chapter meetings and other rituals that remain a mystery to those outside the DKE fraternity.

The building was never used to house fraternity members, who stayed at a house at 609 S. State, then a house at 1912 Geddes before DKE secured its current home at 1004 Olivia Ave.

Over time, DKE has lifted the veil of secrecy surrounding the Shant building. Years ago, only fraternity members were allowed to step foot inside the house and the brick wall outside was constructed in 1901 to keep people off the property.

Christensen said in the 1970s and 1980s, DKE members and alumni would often use the Shant building as a gathering place on football Saturdays. People would sometimes watch the games on a television on the building’s second floor.

DKE almost sold the Shant in 1980 as the fraternity faced financial troubles. A fundraising effort led by DKE alumni David K. Easlick saved the building and ownership was transferred to the newly formed Rampant Lion Foundation, which supports DKE’s educational activities.

Listing broker Jim Chaconas described the Shant as “the building that everybody wants to know.”

Today, the Omicron Chapter of DKE only meets inside the Shant about twice a year.

“It might be an alumni event, it could be a physical pinning of the pledges,” Christensen said.

The fraternity’s international headquarters rents the building’s first floor from the Rampant Lion Foundation.

A look inside the building

The DKE fraternity is proud of its history.

The walls inside the Shant are lined with photographs of DKE alumni, including five U.S. presidents: Rutherford B. Hayes, Theodore Roosevelt, U-M grad Gerald Ford, George H.W. Bush and George W. Bush.

Doomed President Ford’s Fraternity House Building in Ann Arbor Discovers Redeemer to get New Lease on Life. Delta Kappa Epsilon Fraternity Flag.

The DKE flag on display at the Shant building in 2009.The Ann Arbor News file photo 

The Gerald Ford library is on the building’s second floor, featuring works by and about DKE members.

Old DKE artifacts, including a paddle from Yale’s DKE chapter, are on display on the second floor. One photograph shows the DKE flag when it was carried to the North Pole by its discoverer.

Bricks on the Shant’s outdoor patio feature names of DKE alumni, including Gerald Ford, who have donated to the Rampant Lion Foundation.

New life for the Shant

The Shant building is listed for lease as the building is in need of repairs to its four architectural chimney features. Christensen said the fraternity organization does not have the cash flow to make the necessary repairs, and selling the building would be a last resort.

The building has a 2014 assessed value of $209,300. The property’s 2013 taxes were about $4,070.

A lease agreement with a future tenant would offer discounted rent while repairs are made to the building.

“The idea is that we would rent the space and do an agreement with a reduced rent amount and the tenant would pay for necessary repairs,” Christensen said. “The tenant would get a beautiful, unusual building to lease and then we would have the building maintained.”

Chaconas, of Colliers, said to restore the chimneys with the original materials would cost upward of $60,000. To rebuild them with different materials but a similar appearance would cost about $12,000.

Chaconas said a new tenant would not alter the character of the building.

“I’ve gone to the Historical Society and City of Ann Arbor and they are going to work with us so we don’t have to disturb the structure of the Shant,” he said.

Chaconas said he’s received preliminary interest in the building and had some showings. Examples of retail tenants he cited include a coffee shop, a wine bar or a small restaurant. Christensen mentioned a yoga studio as another example.

“It’s in a hot little area, and you’ve got your outside seating,” Chaconas said. “The upstairs could be seating, and downstairs could be a little coffee bar. …Somebody is going to do really well there.”

Lizzy Alfs is a business reporter for The Ann Arbor News. Reach her at 734-255-2638, email her lizzyalfs@mlive.com or follow her on Twitter

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DOOMED PRESIDENT GERALD FORD’S FRATERNITY HOUSE BUILDING DISCOVERS REDEEMER TO GET NEW LEASE ON LIFE.
DOOMED PRESIDENT GERALD FORD’S FRATERNITY HOUSE BUILDING IN ANN ARBOR DISCOVERS REDEEMER TO GET NEW LEASE ON LIFE.
A brick donated by former President Gerald Ford sits in the ground outside the Shant, the traditional gathering house for members of Delta Kappa Epsilon’s Omicron chapter at the University of Michigan. Ford was a member of DKE. Angela Cesere | AnnArbor.com                                                                                                                                                                                                            
DOOMED PRESIDENT GERALD FORD’S FRATERNITY HOUSE BUILDING DISCOVERS REDEEMER TO GET NEW LEASE ON LIFE.

DOOMED PRESIDENCY OF GERALD FORD – AMERICA’S UNFINISHED WAR

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DOOMED PRESIDENCY OF GERALD FORD – AMERICA’S UNFINISHED WAR

Doomed Presidency of Gerald Ford – America’s Unfinished War.

Nixon-Kissinger and Gerald Ford initiated era of Doomed US Presidency when they concluded War against Communism through negotiated Surrender. Unchecked Communist Expansionism in Southern Asia poses severe risks to vital US security interests in Asia-Pacific Region.

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada

DOOM DOOMA DOOMSAYER

Doomed Presidency of Gerald Ford – America’s Unfinished War. The Fall of Saigon announced by President Ford on April 23, 1975.

Clipped from: http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/ford-says-that-war-is-finished-for-america?

FORD SAYS THAT WAR IS FINISHED FOR AMERICA

At a speech at Tulane University, President Gerald Ford says the Vietnam War is finished as far as America is concerned. “Today, Americans can regain the sense of pride that existed before Vietnam. But it cannot be achieved by re-fighting a war.” This was devastating news to the South Vietnamese, who were desperately pleading for U.S. support as the North Vietnamese surrounded Saigon for the final assault on the capital city.

The North Vietnamese had launched a major offensive in March to capture the provincial capital of Ban Me Thuot (Darlac province) in the Central Highlands. The South Vietnamese defenders there fought very poorly and were quickly overwhelmed by the North Vietnamese attackers. Despite previous promises by both Presidents Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford to provide support, the United States did nothing. In an attempt to reposition his forces for a better defense, South Vietnamese President Nguyen Van Thieu ordered his forces in the Highlands to withdraw to more defensible positions to the south. What started out as a reasonably orderly withdrawal soon degenerated into a panic that spread throughout the South Vietnamese armed forces. The South Vietnamese abandoned Pleiku and Kontum in the Highlands with very little fighting and the North Vietnamese pressed the attack from the west and north. In quick succession, Quang Tri, Hue, and Da Nang in the north fell to the communist onslaught. The North Vietnamese continued to attack south along the coast, defeating the South Vietnamese forces at each encounter.

As the North Vietnamese forces closed on the approaches to Saigon, the politburo in Hanoi issued an order to Gen. Van Tien Dung to launch the “Ho Chi Minh Campaign,” the final assault on Saigon itself. Dung ordered his forces into position for the final battle.

The South Vietnamese 18th Division made a valiant final stand at Xuan Loc, 40 miles northeast of Saigon, in which the South Vietnamese soldiers destroyed three of Dung’s divisions. However, the South Vietnamese finally succumbed to the superior North Vietnamese numbers. With the fall of Xuan Loc on April 21 and Ford’s statement at Tulane, it was apparent that the North Vietnamese would be victorious. President Thieu resigned and transferred authority to Vice President Tran Van Huong before fleeing Saigon on April 25.

By April 27, the North Vietnamese had completely encircled Saigon and began to maneuver for their final assault. By the morning of April 30, it was all over. When the North Vietnamese tanks crashed through the gates of the Presidential Palace in Saigon, the South Vietnamese surrendered and the Vietnam War was officially over.

DOOMED PRESIDENCY OF GERALD FORD – AMERICA’S UNFINISHED WAR. NIXON-KISSINGER VIETNAM TREASON DID NOT FINISH AMERICA’S WAR ON COMMUNIST EXPANSIONISM.

NO CHINA, NO RUSSIA – U.S. MUST CHOOSE TIBET EQUILIBRIUM

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 NO CHINA, NO RUSSIA – U.S. MUST CHOOSE TIBET EQUILIBRIUM

NO RUSSIA, NO CHINA – U.S. MUST CHOOSE TIBET EQUILIBRIUM. RUSSIAN EMPIRE IN 1913.

United States must define Foreign Policy before choosing allies. “AMERICA FIRST” Foreign Policy demands choosing “TIBET EQUILIBRIUM.”

NO RUSSIA, NO CHINA – U.S. MUST CHOOSE TIBET EQUILIBRIUM. QING CHINA EMPIRE CIRCA. 1820.

Both Russia and China are major military powers of world competing for Superpower status. To achieve ‘Balance of Power’ to restore ‘Power Equilibrium’, America must choose Tibet because of its strategic location.

NO RUSSIA, NO CHINA – U.S. MUST CHOOSE TIBET EQUILIBRIUM. BRITISH EMPIRE 1921.

Tibet is second largest nation of the region and Tibet’s Independence from military occupation is the only real solution to contain and engage military powers like Russia and China.

NO RUSSIA, NO CHINA – U.S. MUST CHOOSE TIBET EQUILIBRIUM. A SATELLITE’S EYE VIEW OF TIBETAN PLATEAU.
  • Major Retd Rudranarasimham, DOOM DOOMA DOOMSAYER

CHINA OR RUSSIA? U.S. MAY HAVE TO CHOOSE AN ALLY

NEWSWEEK

Newsweek Europe

NO RUSSIA, NO CHINA – U.S. MUST CHOOSE TIBET EQUILIBRIUM.

© Provided by IBT Media (UK) RTX2QS13

This article originally appeared on The Conversation.

Forty-five years ago, last February, U.S. President Richard Nixon returned from a visit to China that shocked the world and unsettled leaders in Moscow, who were awaiting a visit from Nixon a few months later.

Soviet leaders wondered if they were finally witnessing the birth of a U.S.-China alliance that they had feared ever since the breakdown of the Sino-Soviet alliance in the early 1960s.

As Washington and the media convulse over every new outrage emanating from Moscow, while President Trump repeatedly asks, “Wouldn’t it be nice if we actually got along with Russia?” U.S. policymakers are faced with the same choice between Russia and China, though this time the stakes might be even higher.

The history of persistent tensions between Russia and China suggests two choices: Accommodate and reconcile with Russia to balance against the greater power—China. Or, align with China to defend a rules-based international order from its most powerful antagonist—Russia.

It should be clear by now that we can no longer oppose Russia and China at the same time. Though that route might seem tempting and natural, given the historical aspirations of U.S. foreign policy to protect territorial sovereignty, promote human rights and provide a framework for free trade, we are no longer equal to the task.

At a minimum, that would require decisive U.S. action in Syria, firm military support for the government in Kiev, a drastic military buildup of NATO forces across Eastern Europe and a more confrontational posture in the South and East China seas. Doing that would further stretch  a U.S. military that is already facing a personnel shortage. It would also represent a burden that the American people apparently no longer wish to carry.

Lost in the discussion of whether Trump’s “America First” bravado reflects militarism or isolationism are the ways in which our options have been shaped by the administration that preceded him.

Russia’s President Vladimir Putin, second from right, and China President Xi Jinping watch the Victory Day parade at Red Square in Moscow, Russia, May 9, 2015. Reuters

We have only begun to reckon with the foreign policy legacy of Barack Obama, but he has clearly done more to shape the current global predicament than Trump has. When the Russian, Iranian and Turkish foreign ministers met in Moscow in the final weeks of the Obama administration to solve the Syrian crisis by themselves without inviting
the U.S., they were making a startling declaration: The nation that had once declared itself to be “indispensable” was now very clearly dispensable. It would have been unthinkable at any point since Pearl Harbor for American interests to be discounted so brazenly in solving the most pressing international crisis.

It is hard to separate the factors that brought us to this point. Is this simply an inevitable product of relative, or even absolute, American decline? Is it a product of a president who sought to “lead from behind” and whose fundamental foreign policy principle was that sins of commission are always worse than sins of omission? Or did Obama conclude he was dealing with a country, already exhausted by wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, that was no longer willing to shoulder the burden of defending the free world? Either way, Trump has inherited a country that is no longer willing and able to play the leadership role it once did in world affairs.

So where do we go from here? If we cannot oppose both Russia and China, then we need to compromise with at least one of them.

MAKE FRIENDS WITH RUSSIA?

Arguing for a Russian alignment is the notion that China already does more damage to American interests around the globe than Russia does. China damages U.S. economic interests through unfair trade practices, our standing in Asia by undermining our alliances, and our ability to promote democracy, particularly in Africa, by offering aid and investment without good governance conditions. As China grows more powerful and assertive, its efforts to drive the U.S. out of East Asia, coupled with increasing challenges to American interests around the globe, will amount to a full-spectrum challenge to the current U.S. position in the world.

In contrast, Russia’s challenges to American interests are relative pinpricks. Russia does not have the ability to turn either Eastern Europe or the Middle East into its own sphere of influence. It is even losing the competition for economic influence in Central Asia, its own post-Soviet backyard, to China.

Putin might not be an evil dictator bent on doing as much damage to the West as possible, but rather a spurned pragmatist with a realistic view of Russia’s position in the world who had initially hoped to cooperate with Western leaders, but has been embittered by poor treatment by them. Putin’s Russia, therefore, would represent not a mortal threat to the international world order, but rather a missed opportunity, one that can still perhaps be salvaged.

OR CHOOSE CHINA INSTEAD?

Alternatively, we could align with China against Russia.

This approach makes sense if you believe Putin began as a pragmatist, but that was only a temporary tack, given his KGB background and nationalist authoritarian inclinations. But now that he has seen how weak his opponents are and how much havoc he can wreak, he has set his sights higher. Fifteen years ago he might not have imagined he could break NATO or the EU, but now that seems within reach, and nothing will deter him from this chance to realize the fondest dreams of his Soviet predecessors. What could we possibly offer him to match such dreams? He would revel in the chaos that would follow.

Chaos, however, is precisely the opposite of what the leaders in Beijing desire. China’s resurgence is built on a world of peace and trade, a world ultimately sustained by American military strength. For China to seek to challenge such an order, it would have to imagine that it could not only fill the role the U.S. currently fills, but manage the transition in such a way as to avoid a chaotic interlude. Chinese leaders are far too clear-headed for such a gambit, and in any case they see no need to rush such a transition before conditions for it have matured.

President Xi Jinping is anyway preoccupied with ensuring the indefinite continuation of Communist Party rule. What could jeopardize that more than a world in chaos and economic disaster?

IS THE CHOICE EVEN OURS?

With Russia against China? With China against Russia?

There is no question such a choice is unpalatable. Not only would either alternative involve morally difficult concessions, but having to make the choice at all implies that the United States is no longer capable of defending the world order it has long sponsored. This is a difficult reality to accept.

And broaching the possibility of such a choice leads to more difficult questions.

Could Russia even be persuaded to align with the U.S. against China or China against Russia? What would we have to offer either side? What would this mean for our allies, especially in Europe and East Asia? The latter question might not be as insoluble as it may seem, because our allies have long since begun anticipating just such a scenario. But if we are no longer able and willing to perform the role we once did, we need to reckon with the consequences.

Jeremy Friedman is Assistant Professor, Business, Government, and the International Economy, Harvard Business School.

 

NO RUSSIA, NO CHINA – U.S. MUST CHOOSE TIBET EQUILIBRIUM. RUSSIAN EMPIRE 1914.                                                                                                                                                                                              
NO RUSSIA, NO CHINA – U.S. MUST CHOOSE TIBET EQUILIBRIUM. THE CHINESE  EMPIRE 1910.                                                                                                                                                                                      
NO RUSSIA, NO CHINA – U.S. MUST CHOOSE TIBET EQUILIBRIUM.                                      
NO RUSSIA, NO CHINA – U.S. MUST CHOOSE TIBET EQUILIBRIUM.

CHINA MINUS TIBET EQUALS TO POWER EQUILIBRIUM

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CHINA MINUS TIBET EQUALS TO POWER EQUILIBRIUM

CHINA MINUS TIBET EQUALS TO POWER EQUILIBRIUM. PRESIDENT TRUMP WITH CHINESE PRESIDENT XI JINPING.

To deal with problems of Red China’s Economic, Political, Military, Maritime, and Nuclear Expansionism, I have to address the problem of Red China’s Territorial Expansionism. Red China gained 965, 000 square miles of Tibetan Territory through military occupation. In terms of size, Tibet is the second largest nation in Southern Asia, almost as large as Republic of India( over 1, 269, 221 square miles).

Evicting Tibet’s military occupier is the first step that will restore Balance of Power in Asia and I name this process as ‘TIBET EQUILIBRIUM’ for Tibetan Territory is the Key for Political, Economic, Military Imbalance that is undermining International Relations.

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada
Ann Arbor, MI 48104-4162 USA
SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE

CHINA MINUS TIBET EQUALS POWER EQUILIBRIUM. PRESIDENT TRUMP WITH CHINESE PRESIDENT XI JINPING.
CHINA MINUS TIBET EQUALS TO POWER EQUILIBRIUM. PRESIDENT TRUMP MEETS CHINESE PRESIDENT XI JINPING.
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China Minus Tibet Equals to Power Equilibrium.

Chinese President Xi Jinping arrived in Palm Beach, Fla., on Thursday for an unorthodox meeting at President Trump’s Mar-a-Lago estate. The presidents and their wives are scheduled to spend about 24 hours together, including a Thursday night dinner and a working lunch the following day.
The first meaningful discussions between arguably the two most powerful people on the planet are, of course, hugely significant. Trump spent a large chunk of his election campaign attacking China’s supposedly unfair trade and fiscal practices, which he promised would be challenged by a more protectionist and nationalist Trump presidency. Xi, meanwhile, is meeting the erratic U.S. president at a time when his own political future at home is not as secure as some might think.

f4c1f20129dc6868f24a5c4c034ae3df-540-0-847573220417044480width540embedTypetwitter.jpg
China Minus Tibet Equals to Power Equilibrium.

Trump has already signaled this may be a tough encounter. But, as my colleague Simon Denyer wrote last week, it’s quite likely Xi has come bearing gifts — “a package of pledges designed to give the U.S. president some ‘tweetable’ promises to present as victories.” Whether this translates into long-term wins for either leader is less clear. Either way, here are the main storylines to watch:
The question of trade
“We can’t continue to allow China to rape our country,” declared Trump on the campaign trail last year. He was talking about the United States’ considerable trade deficit with China and Beijing’s history of currency manipulation. Part of Trump’s pledge to revive blue-collar American jobs explicitly involved punishing China on the world stage.
This was a major departure from previous U.S. administrations, both Republican and Democratic, which embraced the dogma of open markets and sought to make China a reliable partner within — not an opponent to — an American-led international order. Earlier this year, as the world readied for Trump’s inauguration, Xi cast himself as a custodian of that order, defending globalization, open borders and free trade — all things Trump campaigned against — at the World Economic Forum. Xi’s rhetoric received mixed reviews, but it underscored the strange new paradigm shaping global relations.
Ahead of Xi’s visit this week, China’s state media attempted to make the case for normal bilateral ties. “U.S. job losses are not China’s fault,” read a Xinhua commentary on Wednesday. The next day, another piece argued that China’s trade surplus “does not necessarily mean China benefits while the United States loses.” Xinhua went on: “About 40 percent of the trade surplus is actually generated by U.S. companies in China.”
Ironically, as economic experts note, Trump’s protectionist agenda is more in line with China’s own practices, including its boosting of mammoth Chinese state-run companies.
“Mr. Trump seems to want to move the U.S. toward China’s approach, rather than move China toward the U.S. approach of open trade and globalization,” said Eswar Prasad, a professor of trade at Cornell University, to my colleague Ana Swanson. “He seems to want the U.S. to be more like China than China to be more like the U.S. And I’m not sure that’s the best path for the U.S. to go down.”

 

A magazine featuring President Trump on display with Chinese military magazines at a newsstand in Beijing on April 4. (Mark Schiefelbein/Associated Press)
The question of security
There will be a Kim Jong Un-shaped elephant in the room in Mar-a-Lago. Amid a flurry of North Korean missile tests, the Trump administration is keen on getting China — Pyongyang’s only real friend — to bring the pariah state to heel. Trump and other senior administration officials have signaled their impatience with North Korea and threatened unilateral action in the past week.
“The clock is very, very quickly running out,” a senior White House official told reporters. “All options are on the table for us.”
This may all be bluster intended to pressure Beijing, which has cast itself as the honest broker between the North Koreans and the United States — much to American chagrin. Washington’s longstanding frustration with what it perceives as China’s unwillingness (or inability) to rein in North Korea will also run up against other geopolitical disagreements, including differences over China’s expansionist role in the South China Sea and the status of Taiwan.
On all these fronts, it’s likely the Xi-Trump meeting will yield polite sound bites — and few real changes to the tense status quo.
The question of strategy
In the short term, Trump may emerge from Mar-a-Lago having burnished his credentials as a budding statesman — a pleasant photo-op here, a nice headline there. Xi, who will return home as the Communist Party is preparing for a cabinet reshuffle, has to walk a difficult line and “lose face” in the eyes of the global media and the Chinese public.
But in the long term, Western observers see an alarming drift in the course of U.S.-China relations.

China Minus Tibet Equals to Power Equilibrium.

“The problem lies in Mr. Trump’s transactional view of the world. He prefers deals to something as necessarily ill-defined as global leadership,” wrote Financial Times columnist Philip Stephens. “Hence the decision to repudiate the Trans-Pacific Partnership, a trade agreement that would have checked Beijing’s advancing economic influence in the western Pacific and handed Washington important strategic leverage.”
“As recently as four years ago, Xi and other Chinese leaders fretted, publicly and explicitly, that their people were being seduced by the moral glamour of American democracy — by the open hearted confidence of the ‘shining city on a hill’ and by the ability of a nation founded on slavery to elect its first African-American President,” wrote the New Yorker’s Evan Osnos. “Xi worried that the American example of competence, generosity, and contempt for authoritarianism would, someday, drive his own people to challenge the rule of the Communist Party. Xi has less reason to worry about that today.”

UNITED STATES – CHINA RELATIONS DEMAND TIBET EQUILIBRIUM

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UNITED STATES – CHINA RELATIONS DEMAND TIBET EQUILIBRIUM

US – CHINA RELATIONS DEMAND TIBET EQUILIBRIUM. PRESIDENT TRUMP MUST ACCEPT THE ROLE OF BALANCER.

In 1971, United States during Doomed Presidency of Nixon-Kissinger initiated a Policy that disregards the Doctrine of Balance of Power which formulates a system of international relations in which nations shift alliances to maintain an Equilibrium of Power and prevent dominance by any single state. For Balance of Power is the goal of Foreign Policy, nation can enter alliances to maintain stable power relations. Balance of Power describes the posture and policy of a nation or group of nations protecting itself against another nation or group of nations by matching its power against the power of the other side. States can pursue a policy of Balance of Power in two ways; 1. By increasing their own power, as when engaging in an armaments race or in the competitive acquisition of territory; or, 2. By adding to their power that of other states, as when embarking upon a policy of alliances. The role of “BALANCER” or “Holder of the Balance” is guided by one and only one consideration – the maintenance of “BALANCE” itself.

US – CHINA RELATIONS DEMAND TIBET EQUILIBRIUM. CHINA’S MILITARY BUDGET IS EXPANDING TAKING FULL ADVANTAGE OF US – CHINA TRADE DEFICIT.

In my analysis, with emergence of Red China as a major economic and military power of the world, Balance of Power is by necessary has become the focus of United States foreign relations. The geographical location and size of Tibet’s territory give it a predominant role in formulating US relations with all other nations of that region in Asia. For example, the size of China’s immediate neighbors is as follows:

1.Tibet – 965,000 square miles

2. Japan – 142, 811 square miles

3. North Korea – 46, 540 square miles

4. South Korea – 38, 321 square miles

5. Philippines – 115, 830 square miles

6. Taiwan – 13, 885 square miles

7. Malaysia – 128, 430 square miles

8. Indonesia – 741, 096 square miles

9. Brunei – 2, 228 square miles

United States has no choice other than that of upholding the principle of Balance of Power to defend vital, national security interests. US must perform the role of “BALANCER” or Holder of the Balance by restoring Tibet Equilibrium. Tibetan territory cannot remain under Red China’s military occupation.

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada

DOOM DOOMA DOOMSAYER

TIBET SUPPORTERS CONVERGE ON CAPITOL HILL TO LOBBY CONGRESS

March 31, 2017 7:22 PM

  • VOA News

    FILE – The U.S. Capitol building is seen on Capitol Hill in Washington, Jan. 28, 2014.

    More than 130 people from 23 states converged on Capitol Hill to lobby for Tibet the week before Chinese President Xi Jinping is scheduled to meet with President Donald Trump at his Mar-a-Lago retreat in Florida on April 6.

    Although the leaders’ meeting is expected to focus on trade and the need for China to do more to rein in the nuclear and missile programs of its neighbor and ally North Korea, Tibet remains a contentious issue between the two nations.

    “Congress has shown a strong interest in Tibet since the 1980s, passing dozens of laws and resolutions related to Tibet, speaking out about conditions in Tibet, and welcoming visits by the Dalai Lama,” according to a 2014 report by the Congressional Research Service. “Such actions have long been a source of friction in the U.S.-China relationship. China charges that they amount to support for challenges to Chinese rule in Tibet.”

    US – CHINA RELATIONS DEMAND TIBET EQUILIBRIUM.

    FILE – Chinese President Xi Jinping shakes hands with U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson before their meeting at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China, March 19, 2017.

    Bhuchung Tsering of the International Campaign for Tibet in Washington, which organized Tibet Lobby Day, said, “Looking at the meeting of President Xi of China and President Trump, we want to send a message to President Trump, through Congress and to Trump directly, that there is traditional bipartisan support for dialog with China on Tibet,” he said, adding “Secretary [of State Rex] Tillerson says he is committed to promoting dialogue on Tibet and receiving the Dalai Lama.”

    Tibet Lobby Day was held simultaneously in Washington, Brussels and Canberra, Australia, March 27-29.

    “U.S. policy has not changed,” Anna Richey-Allen, a spokeswoman for the State Department’s East Asia and Pacific Bureau, said Friday, adding that the U.S. recognizes the Tibetan Autonomous Region (TAR) and Tibetan autonomous prefectures to be a part of the People’s Republic of China.

    “We remain deeply concerned about human rights abuses and restrictions, including those imposed on religious freedom, in the TAR and elsewhere in China,” she said. “We remain committed to supporting meaningful autonomy for Tibetans and the preservation of their unique religious, cultural and linguistic traditions.

    “The United States encourages the People’s Republic of China to engage with the Dalai Lama and his representative without preconditions.”

    Ngawang Norbu of Boston, Massachusetts, was one of the Tibetan-Americans and Tibet supporters who spoke with more than 250 members of Congress and their staffs during Tibet Lobby Day.

    US – China Relations Demand Tibet Equilibrium. Tibet Lobby Day in Washington, March 2017.

    Ngawang Norbu, a Tibetan-American and Tibet supporter shown in this photo taken from video, attended Tibet Lobby Day on Capitol Hill in Washington, March 2017.

    The activists asked them to continue funding Tibet programs and to promote efforts to gain access to Tibetan areas for U.S. officials, citizens and journalists. They also want the Trump administration to implement the Tibetan Policy Act of 2002 (TPA), which has the stated purpose of supporting “the aspirations of the Tibetan people to safeguard their distinct identity.”

    “The important thing today is that there’s a new administration in America and, along with that, the exile Tibetan administration in India has declared 2017 to be a year of action for Tibet, and so that’s why I’m here,” Norbu told VOA on Wednesday. “It’s our responsibility and obligation to lobby for Tibet, and whether our requests are responded to or not is, of course, up to the leadership here, but in our mind we think our objectives and efforts will bear fruit.”

    Bhuchung expects to see the reintroduction of the proposed Reciprocal Access to Tibet Act by Representative Jim McGovern, a Democrat from Massachusetts; Representative Randy Hultgren, a Republican from Illinois; Senator Marco Rubio, a Florida Republican; and Senator Tammy Baldwin, a Wisconsin Democrat.

    US – China Relations Demand Tibet Equilibrium.Tibet Lobby Day in Washington, March 2017.

    Marah Litchford of North Carolina, shown in this photo taken from video, participated in Tibet Lobby Day in Washington, March 2017.

    North Carolinian Marah Litchford, who has expressed concern about religious freedom in Tibet, participated in the Washington movement. “They listen,” she said. “You just have to talk loudly.”

    Nike Ching and Steven Herman contributed to this report, which originated with reporting by Dondhon Namling of the VOA Tibetan service.

    US – CHINA RELATIONS DEMAND TIBET EQUILIBRIUM.

     

TIBETAN RESISTANCE MOVEMENT – A DAY TO REMEMBER – MARCH 10, 1959

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TIBETAN RESISTANCE MOVEMENT – A DAY TO REMEMBER – MARCH 10, 1959

TIBETAN RESISTANCE MOVEMENT – A DAY TO REMEMBER – MARCH 10, 1959.

Tibetans remember March 10, 1959 as Tibetan National Uprising Day. Tibetans are not asking for “SEPARATION” from Red China. Tibetans claim that Tibet is Never Part of China. The issue of concern is illegal Occupation of Tibet. The purpose of Tibetan Resistance Movement is that of resisting illegal Occupation and to Evict Occupier of Tibet.

Tibetan Resistance Movement. A Day to Remember, March 10, 1959.

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada

DOOM DOOMA DOOMSAYER

This Day In History: 03/10/1959 – Rebellion in Tibet

1959

Rebellion in Tibet

TIBETAN RESISTANCE MOVEMENT. A DAY TO REMEMBER, MARCH 10, 1959. TIBETAN NATIONAL UPRISING DAY.
  • Author
    History.com Staff

  • Publisher
    A+E Networks

 

On this day in 1959, Tibetans band together in revolt, surrounding the summer palace of the Dalai Lama in defiance of Chinese occupation forces.

China’s occupation of Tibet began nearly a decade before, in October 1950, when troops from its People’s Liberation Army (PLA) invaded the country, barely one year after the Communists gained full control of mainland China. The Tibetan government gave into Chinese pressure the following year, signing a treaty that ensured the power of His Holiness the Dalai Lama, the country’s spiritual leader, over Tibet’s domestic affairs. Resistance to the Chinese occupation built steadily over the next several years, including a revolt in several areas of eastern Tibet in 1956. By December 1958, rebellion was simmering in Lhasa, the capital, and the PLA command threatened to bomb the city if order was not maintained.

The March 1959 uprising in Lhasa was triggered by fears of a plot to kidnap the Dalai Lama and take him to Beijing. When Chinese military officers invited His Holiness to visit the PLA headquarters for a theatrical performance and official tea, he was told he must come alone, and that no Tibetan military bodyguards or personnel would be allowed past the edges of the military camp. On March 10, 300,000 loyal Tibetans surrounded Norbulingka Palace, preventing the Dalai Lama from accepting the PLA’s invitation. By March 17, Chinese artillery was aimed at the palace, and the Dalai Lama was evacuated to neighboring India. Fighting broke out in Lhasa two days later, with Tibetan rebels hopelessly outnumbered and outgunned. Early on March 21, the Chinese began shelling Norbulingka, slaughtering tens of thousands of men, women and children still camped outside. In the aftermath, the PLA cracked down on Tibetan resistance, executing the Dalai Lama’s guards and destroying Lhasa’s major monasteries along with thousands of their inhabitants.

China’s stranglehold on Tibet and its brutal suppression of separatist activity has continued in the decades following the unsuccessful uprising. Tens of thousands of Tibetans followed their leader to India, where the Dalai Lama has long maintained a government-in-exile in the foothills of the Himalayas.

 

REMEMBERING MARCH 10, 1959 – TRIBUTE TO PHOTOGRAPHER JIGME TARING

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Remembering historical events of March 10, 1959, I am very happy to share J. Norbu’s tribute to

Tibetan Official Photographer Jigme Taring.

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada

Doom Dooma Doomsayer

THE MYSTERY OF THE MARCH 10 PHOTOGRAPHER

By J. Norbu

 
Last year, when putting together the March 10th Memorial website, a major problem I encountered was obtaining photographs and film footage for this critical period in our modern history. Three black-&-white photographs

were all there was of the public demonstration on the morning of March 10th.

REMEMBERING MARCH 10, 1959. TRIBUTE TO TIBETAN OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHER JIGME TARING.

Possibly the most reproduced of these three photos is that of the enormous crowd gathered before the eastern gate of the Norbulingka palace. A snow lion statue is in the right foreground with the scene extending back to somewhere near the Chango bridge on the Norbulingka–Lhasa road.

REMEMBERING MARCH 10, 1959. TRIBUTE TO TIBETAN OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHER JIGME TARING.

The second photo gives us an even further view of the crowd and shows people from Lhasa streaming to joining the gathering. You also get a glimpse of the Chakpori in the distance. The third photo is disturbing. We have a partial view of the mutilated body of Phakpala Khenchung Sonam Gyaltsen behind one of the two snow lion statues in front of the main gate, surrounded by people brandishing daggers, swords and even a hatchet.

 

Remembering March 10, 1959. Tribute to Tibetan Official Photographer Jigme Taring.

A few of the people are looking up at the photographer who evidently took his picture from one of the two squarish turrets on either side of the main gate, most likely the one on the right as the head of the snow-lion is turned to the left. All three photographs have most likely been taken by the same photographer as the vantage point of all three images appear to be the same.

Remembering March 10, 1959. Tribute to Tibetan Official Photographer Jigme Taring.

My guess is that the photographer was probably Jigme Taring. The people knew him as the Dalai Lama’s official photographer and perhaps that’s why don’t appear particularly hostile to him. We know the public was otherwise very angry, even violent that day. Of course, we cannot be certain that Taring took these photographs, but so far, I have not come across any mention of another official in the Norbulingka that day who might have taken these photographs.

Remembering March 10, 1959. Tribute to Tibetan Official Photographer Jigme Taring.

It is further possible that Jigme Taring also took the two photographs we have of the women’s demonstrations before the Potala Palace at the Dribu Yukhai Thang (where government barley was threshed).

 

Remembering March 10, 1959. Tribute to Tibetan Official Photographer Jigme Taring.

Photo of Jigme Taring shooting a cine-camera, with his still-camera and flash by his side. Photo by Chen Zonglie, Xinhua News Agency.

Jigme Taring was in and out of Norbulingka in the subsequent days, but during the night of the artillery barrage and the next day of the PLA attack he was inside the Summer Palace. It is therefore more than possible that the color images below of armed Tibetan volunteer fighters inside and outside the Norbulingka walls were taken by Jigme Taring. These scenes were shot on color film, most probably on the “official” cine-camera that Jigme Taring had earlier used to film the Dalai Lama’s Geshe examinations.

Remembering March 10, 1959. Tribute to photographer Jigme Taring. H.H. The Dalai Lama at his Geshe examination.

The Dalai Lama debating at his Geshe examination. From the official film shot by Jigme Taring.

He had probably used what was left of his color film stock to record the scenes at the Norbulingka. We now know that in the chaos Taring left the cine-camera behind in Norbulingka with a young official, and it is almost certain that the Chinese later obtained the camera and film. Some of the footage taken by Taring later appeared (in black& white) in the Chinese propaganda film Putting Down the Rebellion in Tibet. The Chinese Propaganda Department was then using black and white film, and only a few years later used color film for their documentary, By The Lhasa River. The color footage of the Taring film have also appeared in other documentaries and are probably now available somewhere in Beijing.

The following images are screenshots taken off a video made from the color film. In the first image the person sitting in the foreground, right, looks very much like a young Juchen Thupten Namgyal of Derge, who in his 22 volume (!) autobiography mentions that he was a volunteer defender at the Norbulingka.

Remembering March 10, 1959. Tribute to photographer Jigme Taring.
Remembering March 10, 1959. Tribute to photographer Jigme Taring.
Remembering March 10, 1959. Tribute to photographer Jigme Taring.
Remembering March 10, 1959. Tribute to photographer Jigme Taring.

We cannot be sure but the next three images are possibly scenes inside and outside the Norbulingka. The neat walls in the second and third image could be the outer wall of the Norbulingka and the yellow wall in the fourth image could be that of the interior compound, which was traditionally painted yellow.

The Chinese also shot some black & white footage of Tibetan volunteers outside the Norbulingka though it was understandably taken from a distance. A Chinese journalist Shan Chao [1] accompanied some PLA officers in a convoy of three armored cars on Monday the 16th to survey the trenches and fortifications the “rebels” were building at the northern end of the Norbulingka. A cameraman from the propaganda department recorded the scene on film.

Remembering March 10, 1959. Tribute to Photographer Jigme Taring.
Remembering March 10, 1959. Tribute to Photographer Jigme Taring.

In conclusion, I would like to dedicate this post to the memory of Jigme Taring – photographer and man of courage. In March 1959, he went to the Norbulingka to serve and protect the Dalai Lama and remained there through the period of the Dalai Lama’s escape, and during the subsequent fighting. In his autobiography, the monk official (tsedrung) Tenpa Soepa [2] mentions meeting Jigme Taring during an intense artillery bombardment.

Taring Dzasak who asked me for help, and we went inside the Phodrang Sarpa (New Palace). All the window panes were broken and the floor was filled with shards of glass. Taring Dzasak took out a (cine?) camera and a few rolls of film from a room below the Phodrang and said, pointing his gun to his head said, ‘Let’s get going, If worse comes to worst, this is the way’. He clearly meant that if nothing worked, we would have to take our own lives. As we came out of the Phodrang, a shell landed near us and exploded; when the smoke cleared, Taring Dzasak was nowhere to be seen.”

Remembering March 10, 1959. Tribute to Photographer Jigme Taring.

According to Mrs. Taring [1] her husband told her (in exile) that he had taken the official cine-camera from the Dalai Lama’s palace and shot scenes of the fighting and artillery bombardments. He then gave the camera to a junior official to look after, but never met him again. He then took a rifle from an official who did not know how to handle it and joined in the fighting. Finally, he and a soldier, Pasang Thondup, attempted to escape. “To avoid being tortured by the Chinese they made a pact that if either of them was hit by a shell, then the injured one should be shot dead by the other.” But both of them managed to escape. “His only possessions when he fled was a camera, some film, a pair of binoculars and a revolver.”

On his way, south he was stopped by Chushigangdruk fighters but convinced them that he was Taring Dzasak and that the photographs in his camera were invaluable and should reach the Dalai Lama. They let him go. This camera was most likely his still camera with which he took the three black-&-white photographs (and the women’s rally photos) discussed at the beginning of this article – which have immeasurably benefited our history and struggle.

Notes:

[1] Tenpa Soepa, 20 Years of My Life in China’s Death Camp, Author House, Bloomington IN, 2008, p.30

[2] Shan Chao, “Sunshine After Rain: From a Lhasa Diary”, Peking Review May 5, 1959 No:18, Special Tibet Number.

 Dolma

[3] Rinchen Taring, Daughter of Tibet, John Murray, London, 1970. p.297-298

REMEMBERING MARCH 10, 1959.

 

REMEMBERING MARCH 10, 1959.