Tibet Equilibrium 2019

RED CHINA’S JOURNEY FROM IMPERIALISM TO NEOCOLONIALISM

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RED CHINA’S JOURNEY FROM IMPERIALISM TO NEOCOLONIALISM

Tibet escaped from the clutches of Qing Empire during 1911-12 to declare full independence on February 13, 1913. From the ashes of the Qing Empire, Red China emerged as the new Imperialistic Power on October 01, 1949 when the Communists took over mainland China defeating the Nationalists. For Tibet, the new era of political domination, cultural subjugation, and colonialist exploitation began with Red China’s military invasion in 1950.

Red China’s Journey from Imperialism to Neocolonialism.

The railway construction projects across the Tibetan Plateau are mere symptoms of Neocolonialism, a facet of Red China’s Doctrine of Expansionism.

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada

SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE

CHINA TO STRENGTHEN RAILWAY CONSTRUCTION IN OCCUPIED TIBET

Red China’s Journey from Imperialism to Neocolonialism.

Staff members work at the construction site of the Lhasa-Nyingchi section of the Sichuan-Tibet Railway in Occupied Tibet, on Nov. 26, 2018. In 2018, an investment of 4.2 billion yuan (623 million U.S. dollars) was made in railway construction in the region. (Xinhua/Purbu Zhaxi)

Red China’s Journey from Imperialism to Neocolonialism.

Staff members work at the construction site of the Lhasa-Nyingchi section of the Sichuan-Tibet Railway in Occupied Tibet, on Nov. 26, 2018. In 2018, an investment of 4.2 billion yuan (623 million U.S. dollars) was made in railway construction in the region. (Xinhua/Purbu Zhaxi)

Red China’s Journey from Imperialism to Neocolonialism.

Workers have lunch at the construction site of the Lhasa-Nyingchi section of the Sichuan-Tibet Railway in Occupied Tibet, on Nov. 26, 2018. In 2018, an investment of 4.2 billion yuan (623 million U.S. dollars) was made in railway construction in the region. (Xinhua/Chogo)

Red China’s Journey from Imperialism to Neocolonialism.

Workers at the construction site of the Lhasa-Nyingchi section of the Sichuan-Tibet Railway in Occupied Tibet, on Nov. 26, 2018. In 2018, an investment of 4.2 billion yuan (623 million U.S. dollars) was made in railway construction in the region. (Xinhua/Chogo)

Red China’s Journey from Imperialism to Neocolonialism.

Photo taken on Dec. 23, 2018, shows the construction site of the Lhasa-Nyingchi section of the Sichuan-Tibet Railway in Occupied Tibet. In 2018, an investment of 4.2 billion yuan (623 million U.S. dollars) was made in railway construction in the region. (Xinhua/Purbu Zhaxi)

Red China’s Journey from Imperialism to Neocolonialism.

 

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THE RECIPROCAL ACCESS TO TIBET ACT IS NOT FOR BOOSTING TOURISM

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THE RECIPROCAL ACCESS TO TIBET ACT IS NOT FOR BOOSTING TOURISM

The Reciprocal Access to Tibet Act is not for boosting Tourism.

The Reciprocal Access to Tibet Act is not for promoting Tibetan Tourism. The ‘Access’ is demanded to monitor Human Rights violations in the Occupied Tibetan territory.

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada

SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE

The Reciprocal Access to Tibet Act is not for boosting Tourism.

China pledges easier foreign tourist access to Tibet amid U.S. pressure 

The Reciprocal Access to Tibet Act is not for boosting Tourism.

BEIJING (Reuters) – The Chinese government in Tibet said it will boost numbers and cut waiting times for foreign tourists visiting the highly restricted region, amid renewed pressure from the United States for greater access for U.S. officials and journalists.

U.S. President Donald Trump signed into law the Reciprocal Access to Tibet Act in December, which seeks to press China to open the region by denying U.S. entry for officials deemed responsible for restricting access to Tibet.

Beijing denounced the law at the time as interference in China’s internal affairs, risking “serious harm” to ties with Washington.

China and the United States are engaged in talks to try to hammer out a deal to end a festering trade dispute that has threatened to sour the relationship across the board, including on issues such as security, influence and human rights.

The Tibetan government will shorten the time required for foreign tourists to gain access to the region by half and boost numbers by fifty percent, Qizhala, chairman of the regional government, said in an annual work report published by the official Tibet Daily newspaper on Friday.

Non-Chinese visitors must apply for a special permit to travel to remote, mountainous Tibet, which is usually granted for tourists provided they travel with approved tour companies but rarely for journalists and diplomats.

Beijing has ruled Tibet with an iron fist since Chinese Communist Party troops marched into the region in 1950 in what it terms a “peaceful liberation”.

Qizhala also pledged that the government in Tibet would “take a clear-cut stance in the fight against the Dalai clique”, a reference to exiled spiritual leader the Dalai Lama.

“We must improve the monastery management and service mechanisms to defend the bottom line of Tibetan Buddhism not being manipulated by foreign forces,” he said, and management of religious activities must prevent another “upsurge” of religion.

Rights groups and overseas activists say ethnic Tibetans face widespread restrictions under Chinese rule and the U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights said in June conditions were “fast deteriorating”.

This year marks the 60th anniversary of a Tibetan uprising against Chinese rule in 1959. Supporters of Tibetan independence and of the Dalai Lama have staged protests in the past to mark the uprising’s anniversary, angering China.

China views the Dalai Lama, Tibet’s Buddhist spiritual leader who fled into exile in India after the failed uprising, as a dangerous separatist.

The Nobel Peace laureate denies espousing violence and says he only wants genuine autonomy for Tibet.

Reporting by Christian Shepherd; Editing by Paul Tait

The Reciprocal Access to Tibet Act is not for boosting Tourism.

ASIA REASSURANCE INITIATIVE ACT SYMBOLIZES THE COLD WAR IN ASIA

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ASIA REASSURANCE INITIATIVE ACT SYMBOLIZES THE COLD WAR IN ASIA

 
 

In my analysis, the Asia Reassurance Initiative Act symbolizes the reality of ‘The Cold War in Asia’. President of Tibet and the President of the United States have acknowledged the threat posed by the Enemy’s presence in Tibet.

 
 

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada

SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE

 
 

CTA President welcomes the enactment of Asia Reassurance Initiative Act (ARIA) | Central Tibetan Administration

 
 

 
 

 
 

Clipped from: https://tibet.net/2019/01/cta-president-welcomes-the-enactment-of-asia-reassurance-initiative-act-aria/

 
 

CTA President hails the Asia Reassurance Initiative Act.

Dharamshala: President Dr Lobsang Sangay of Central Tibetan Administration hailed the enactment of the Asia Reassurance Initiative Act (ARIA) on Tuesday, saying that the passage is a much-welcomed move. US President Donald Trump signed the ARIA Act into law on 31 December 2018, having passed the Senate and the House on 4 and 12 December respectively. 

President Dr Sangay thanked the US Congress for passing the Asia Reassurance Initiative Act, which references Tibet in terms of supporting “activities preserving cultural traditions and promoting sustainable development, education, and environmental conservation in Tibetan communities in the Tibet Autonomous Region and in other Tibetan communities in China, India, and Nepal.”

CTA President, in recent years, has made multiple visits to the United States and held high-level meetings in the Senate as well as the House of Representatives. During those meetings, he has relentlessly tabled the issue of prioritizing Tibet at the core of US policy. The Office of Tibet in Washington DC has also made tremendous efforts towards this.

“ARIA ensures that the US will continue to support Tibet by authorizing funds for Tibet-related programs and by highlighting Chinese human rights abuses against the Tibetan people,” said Senators Cory Gardner (R-Colo.) and Ed Markey (D-Mass.), the lead sponsors of the Act.

Matteo Mecacci, president of the International Campaign for Tibet said: “This Act rightly places the issue of Tibet within the parameters of US security interests. Tibet occupies an Asian fault zone of clashing cultures and big-power politics.”

The Act, known as ARIA, aims at enhancing American leadership in the Indo-Pacific region and strengthening cooperation with regional partners, including India and Taiwan. It says, “The United States has a fundamental interest in defending human rights and promoting the rule of law in the Indo-Pacific region.”

Following is the reference to Tibet in the Act.
SEC. 409. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

(a) Promotion of Democracy in the Indo-Pacific Region.–
(1) In general.–There is authorized to be appropriated $210,000,000, for each of the fiscal years 2019 through 2023, to promote democracy, strengthen civil society, human rights, rule of law, transparency, and accountability in the Indo- Pacific region, including for universities, civil society, and multilateral institutions that are focusing on education awareness, training, and capacity building.

(2) Democracy in china. –Amounts appropriated pursuant to paragraph (1) shall be made available for United States Government efforts, led by the Assistant Secretary of State for Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor, to promote democracy, the rule of law, and human rights in the People’s Republic of China.

(3) Tibet. –Amounts appropriated pursuant to paragraph (1) shall be made available for nongovernmental organizations to support activities preserving cultural traditions and promoting sustainable development, education, and environmental conservation in Tibetan communities in the Tibet Autonomous Region and in other Tibetan communities in China, India, and Nepal.

The Act also recognizes India as a major Defense partner, the vital role of the strategic partnership between the United States and India in promoting peace and security in the Indo-Pacific region. Section 204 of the Act calls for strengthening and broadening of diplomatic, economic, and security ties between the two countries. 

The Indo-Pacific is a biogeographic region, comprising the Indian Ocean and the western and central Pacific Ocean, including the South China Sea. 

 
 

THE DANGEROUS MILITARY OCCUPATION OF TIBET

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THE DANGEROUS MILITARY OCCUPATION OF TIBET

The Dangerous Military Occupation of Tibet.

In my analysis, the Great Problem of Tibet cannot be resolved by sanctioning “Meaningful Autonomy” to Tibetan people as demanded by His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama. In fact, Tibetans cannot hope for any kind of autonomy if the military occupation of Tibet prevails across Tibetan Territory.

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada

SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE

The Dangerous Military Occupation of Tibet.

Chinese military equips troops in Tibet with mobile howitzers: Report | India News – India TV

The Dangerous Military Occupation of Tibet.

Tuesday, January 08, 2019

Chinese military equips troops in Tibet with mobile

howitzers: Report

China’s People’s Liberation Army (PLA) stationed in Tibet Autonomous Region has been equipped with mobile howitzers which aims to boost the troops’ high-altitude combat capability to improve border security, state-run Global Times reported.

Reported by: PTI, Beijing [ Updated: January 08, 2019 16:53 IST ]

The Dangerous Military Occupation of Tibet.

Image Source: AP

After the recent induction of lightweight battle tank in Tibet bordering India, the Chinese military has equipped its troops stationed at the Himalayan plateau with new vehicle-mounted howitzers to improve their combat capability, official media here reported on Tuesday.

China’s People’s Liberation Army (PLA) stationed in Tibet Autonomous Region has been equipped with mobile howitzers which aims to boost the troops’ high-altitude combat capability to improve border security, state-run Global Times reported.

It quoted Chinese military analysts as saying that the new equipment would be the PLC-181 vehicle-mounted howitzer. The announcement was made in an article released by the WeChat account of the PLA Ground Force on Saturday, the report said.

The equipment was used in an artillery brigade in Tibet during the 2017 China-India stand-off at Doklam, it said. Song Zhongping, a military expert and TV commentator, told Global Times that the howitzer has a 52-caliber cannon with a range of over 50 km and shoots laser-guided and satellite-guided projectiles.

It will boost the high-altitude combat capability of the PLA in Tibet, Song said.

The induction of the mobile howitzers followed the move by the PLA to put into service the lightweight battle tank, which was tested by its military during exercises in Tibet held at the peak of the Doklam standoff.

The Type 15 has an engine capable of 1,000 horsepower and is significantly lighter than the PLA’s other main battle tanks in service, weighing about 32 to 35 tons. The tank meant for rugged and mountainous terrain of the Himalayan region.

The induction of the tank and the mobile howitzers highlighted the PLA’s efforts to reinforce its troops with new equipment despite steady normalization of military relations since last year.

As part of the military training in 2019, an artillery brigade in the Tibet Military Command ordered soldiers to take part in a military skills competition at a training ground on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau 3,700 meters above sea level, the report said.

Last week, President Xi Jinping, who also heads the military, ordered the armed forces to enhance their combat readiness to make sure they are always ready for battle, saying risks and challenges for China are on the rise.

China’s border issue has not been completely resolved, and was challenged by pro-Tibet independence forces and terrorists, the report quoted analyst as saying.

Zhao Gancheng, director of the Centre for Asia-Pacific Studies at the Shanghai Institute for International Studies, told the daily that the military investment in Tibet has been rising, but is primarily meant for defense and not to provoke conflict with neighboring countries.

He said the PLA troops stationed in Tibet need to improve their combat capabilities in plateau areas and strengthen their willpower in extreme weather as they are primarily responsible for the border defense against terrorists and foreign invaders, he said.

To cope with altitude sickness, the PLA built oxygen stations for the soldiers in Tibet in 2015, which were used for medical purposes, but are now also being used regularly in training.

The Dangerous Military Occupation of Tibet.


AMAZING TIBET – BRUTAL MILITARY OCCUPATION

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AMAZING TIBET – BRUTAL MILITARY OCCUPATION

AMAZING TIBET. BRUTAL MILITARY OCCUPATION.

I am not a photographer, but my heart captures the brutality of Tibet’s military occupation without the use of any lens.

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada

SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE

AMAZING TIBET – PHOTOS SHOT BY XINHUA PHOTOGRAPHERS

AMAZING TIBET. BRUTAL MILITARY OCCUPATION.

The aerial photo was taken on March 4, 2018, shows a newly-built bridge across the Lhasa River, a tributary of the Yarlung Zangbo River, Tibet. Amazing shots of Tibet in 2018 are seen through lenses of Xinhua photographers. (Xinhua/Jigme Dorje)

AMAZING TIBET. BRUTAL MILITARY OCCUPATION.

An archer shoots on horseback in an equestrian event in Jiangjiao Village of Lhasa, capital of Tibet, Feb. 25, 2018. Amazing shots of Tibet in 2018 are seen through lenses of Xinhua photographers. (Xinhua/Jigme Dorje)

AMAZING TIBET. BRUTAL MILITARY OCCUPATION.

The photo was taken on Jan. 6, 2018 shows red deer in a forest of the nature reserve in Shannan City, Tibet. Amazing shots of Tibet in 2018 are seen through lenses of Xinhua photographers. (Xinhua/Zhang Rufeng)

AMAZING TIBET. BRUTAL MILITARY OCCUPATION.

A woman carrying forage grass on her back is seen with her daughter in Dingri County in Xigaze, Tibet, Sept. 13, 2018. Amazing shots of Tibet in 2018 are seen through lenses of Xinhua photographers. (Xinhua/Purbu Zhaxi)

AMAZING TIBET. BRUTAL MILITARY OCCUPATION.

Tourists walk into the Potala Palace in Lhasa, Tibet, Nov. 15, 2018. Amazing shots of Tibet in 2018 are seen through lenses of Xinhua photographers. (Xinhua/Purbu Zhaxi)

A woman looks after her child during the break of mowing on a pasture in Damxung County, Tibet, Oct. 2, 2018. Amazing shots of Tibet in 2018 are seen through lenses of Xinhua photographers. (Xinhua/Purbu Zhaxi)

An aerial photo shows the snow-covered Potala Palace in Lhasa, capital of Tibet, Dec. 19, 2018. Amazing shots of Tibet in 2018 are seen through lenses of Xinhua photographers. (Xinhua/Purbu Zhaxi)

Buddhists and tourists participate in the sacred “sunning of the Buddha” ceremony to mark the start of the annual Shoton festival at the Zhaibung Monastery in Lhasa, capital of Tibet, Aug. 11, 2018. Amazing shots of Tibet in 2018 are seen through lenses of Xinhua photographers. (Xinhua/Purbu Zhaxi)

The aerial photo was taken on March 10, 2018 shows a black-necked crane in Linzhou County,Tibet. Amazing shots of Tibet in 2018 are seen through lenses of Xinhua photographers. (Xinhua/Purbu Zhaxi)

Photo taken on Sept. 11, 2018, shows the starry sky in Ngari, Tibet. The Ngari area has an average altitude of over 4,000 meters above sea level. Amazing shots of Tibet in 2018 are seen through lenses of Xinhua photographers. (Xinhua/)

Photo taken on March 30, 2018, shows the Potala Palace after a snowfall in Lhasa, Tibet. Amazing shots of Tibet in 2018 are seen through lenses of Xinhua photographers. (Xinhua/Chogo)

Wild monkeys cling to a car along the Provincial Highway No. 306 at Gyaca County, Tibet, April 23, 2018. Amazing shots of Tibet in 2018 are seen through lenses of Xinhua photographers. (Xinhua/Jigme Dorgi)

A monk is seen during the butter lamps lighting event at the Jokhang Temple in Lhasa, Tibet, Dec. 2, 2018. Amazing shots of Tibet in 2018 are seen through lenses of Xinhua photographers. (Xinhua/)

Aerial photo taken on May 27, 2018, shows the scenery of the Yamdrok Lake in Nagarze County of Shannan City, Tibet. Amazing shots of Tibet in 2018 are seen through lenses of Xinhua photographers. (Xinhua/Jigme Dorgi)

People enjoy “lingka”, meaning leisure time in woods, in the outskirts of Lhasa, Tibet, Aug. 4, 2018. Amazing shots of Tibet in 2018 are seen through lenses of Xinhua photographers. (Xinhua/Liu Jie)

A model presents a creation during a folk costume show at the 5,200-meter-high base camp of the world’s highest peak Qomolangma, in Tibet, Aug. 18, 2018. Amazing shots of Tibet in 2018 are seen through lenses of Xinhua photographers. (Xinhua/Liu Dongjun)

Photo taken on Nov. 7, 2018 shows a roof decoration of the Potala Palace in Lhasa, capital of southwest China’s Tibet Autonomous Region. The golden roofs of the Potala Palace shine in glory after more than 18 months of renovation work. Amazing shots of Tibet in 2018 are seen through lenses of Xinhua photographers. (Xinhua/Purbu Zhaxi)

Photo taken on Sept. 8, 2018, shows sand dunes near the source of the Yarlung Zangbo River in Zhongba County of Xigaze, Tibet. Amazing shots of Tibet in 2018 are seen through lenses of Xinhua photographers. (Xinhua/)

A cyclist rides during a cycling race around the holy lake Mapham Yutso in Pulan County of Ngari Prefecture, Tibet, Sept. 9, 2018. Amazing shots of Tibet in 2018 are seen through lenses of Xinhua photographers. (Xinhua/Purbu Zhaxi)

Rigzin, 49, smiles while grazing a flock of sheep in Rungma Town of Nyima County, Tibet, June 14, 2018. Rigzin and his family are to be relocated to a new home in Lhasa. Amazing shots of Tibet in 2018 are seen through lenses of Xinhua photographers. (Xinhua/Chogo)

AMAZING TIBET. BRUTAL MILITARY OCCUPATION.


HAPPY NEW YEAR GREETINGS FROM TIBET

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HAPPY NEW YEAR GREETINGS FROM TIBET

HAPPY NEW YEAR 2019 GREETINGS FROM TIBET.

Welcome to New Year 2019. If the New Year is like a blank book, and I hold the pen in my hands, I would love to send you these New Year Greetings from Tibet.

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada

SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE

Enjoy the breathtaking winter scenery of Tibet

Clipped from: http://www.ecns.cn/hd/2018-12-31/detail-ifzccnsu7722404.shtml

HAPPY NEW YEAR GREETINGS FROM TIBET.

Photo shows the breathtaking winter scenery of Tibet. (Photo: China News Service/He Penglei)

HAPPY NEW YEAR GREETINGS FROM TIBET.

Photo shows the breathtaking winter scenery of Tibet. (Photo: China News Service/He Penglei)

HAPPY NEW YEAR GREETINGS FROM TIBET.

Photo shows the breathtaking winter scenery of Tibet. (Photo: China News Service/He Penglei)

HAPPY NEW YEAR GREETINGS FROM TIBET.

Photo shows the breathtaking winter scenery of Tibet. (Photo: China News Service/He Penglei)

HAPPY NEW YEAR GREETINGS FROM TIBET.

Photo shows the breathtaking winter scenery of Tibet. (Photo: China News Service/He Penglei)

HAPPY NEW YEAR GREETINGS FROM TIBET.

Photo shows the breathtaking winter scenery of Tibet. (Photo: China News Service/He Penglei)

HAPPY NEW YEAR GREETINGS FROM TIBET.

Photo shows the breathtaking winter scenery of Tibet. (Photo: China News Service/He Penglei)

HAPPY NEW YEAR GREETINGS FROM TIBET.