TIBET AWARENESS – DEFEND RIGHTS OF ENDANGERED TIBETANS

TIBET AWARENESS – DEFEND RIGHTS OF ENDANGERED TIBETANS

Tibet Awareness. Defend Rights of Endangered Tibetans.

I am sharing photo images of endangered Black-necked Cranes visiting Tibet to promote Tibet Awareness. Since 1950, Tibetans lost their Natural Freedom because of China’s military conquest and occupation. I am asking the global community of nations to defend the Rights of Endangered Tibetans and to restore the Political Rights of Tibetans.

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada

SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE

https://bhavanajagat.com/2015/04/16/tibets-freedom-is-a-natural-right/

Across China: Endangered Cranes welcomed by Tibetans during migration

Clipped from: http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2018-12/26/c_137700147.htm

Tibet Awareness. Defend Rights of Endangered Tibetans.

A black-necked crane looks after its chicks in the Qiangtang nature reserve, Tibet, in June of 2017. Black-necked cranes are often seen in Tibet’s river valleys and the region’s barley and wheat fields in winter. With an estimated population of around 10,200, the species is classified as “vulnerable” by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). (Xinhua/Chogo)

LHASA, Dec. 26 (Xinhua) — Every year, black-necked cranes arrive in Tibet, where they are welcomed by locals and tourists.

“This is the only time of the year when we can see flocks of these birds. It’s spectacular!” said Toinzhub Cering, a wildlife ranger in Lhundrup County, which is about 87 miles northeast of Lhasa, Tibet’s capital.

Black-necked cranes are often seen in Tibet’s river valleys and the region’s barley and wheat fields in winter. And Toinzhub knows exactly where to find them.

For ten years, the 42-year-old has patrolled the nature reserve in Lhundrup, one of the major habitats of black-necked cranes.

With an estimated population of around 10,200, the species is classified as “vulnerable” by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

The black-necked crane is the most recently identified among 15 kinds of cranes worldwide. They are also the only kind that inhabits plateau areas with an altitude of 2,500-5,000 meters.

Toinzhub Cering feels passionate about protecting the species and has been doing his part to help. He is always the first person to call media and authorities each year when the rare birds come and go.

Now that he has learned how to use social media, he often shares photos of the cranes with his friends.

Thanks to efforts made by locals and authorities, these exhausted birds, after flying for over 1,000 km, don’t have to face hunger, pesticide, or poachers.

Instead, they can now easily find pollutant-free highland barley and wheat left by farmers.

But endangered animal protection efforts in Tibet cover more than just birds, with the Tibetan antelope also under people’s watch, among other wildlife.

As for damage and losses caused by such animals, residents can claim compensation from the government.

Between mid-March and late April, black-necked cranes migrate to northern Tibet to reproduce in the lakeside marshes, far beyond human touch.

Yet not all journeys go so well for some cranes. Wounded birds are often left behind by the flock.

Two cranes with broken wings were found in Dazi County near Lhasa this spring. The local forestry authority has been caring for them ever since, and, hopes they can catch up with their flock during next year’s migration.

There have also been cases whereby wounded cranes have become permanent residents after recovery.

Black-necked cranes mainly live in the highlands of China, India, Bhutan, and Nepal. Tibet is home to about 80 percent of the world’s total.

Tibet Awareness. Defend Rights of Endangered Tibetans.

A black-necked crane, once wounded during migration, becomes a permanent resident at a temple near Xigaze, southwest China’s Tibet Autonomous Region, Sept. 27, 2014. (Xinhua/Chogo)

Tibet Awareness. Defend Rights of Endangered Tibetans.

Group of black-necked cranes flying over Lhasa River Valley, Tibet, Nov. 23, 2017. (Xinhua/Purbu Zhaxi)

Tibet Awareness. Defend Rights of Endangered Tibetans.

A black-necked crane looks after its chicks in the Qiangtang nature reserve, Tibet, June 24, 2017. (Xinhua/Purbu Zhaxi)

Tibet Awareness. Defend Rights of Endangered Tibetans.

Photo taken on Dec. 18, 2018 shows black-necked cranes in Linzhou County of Lhasa, capital of Tibet. (Xinhua/Purbu Zhaxi)

Tibet Awareness. Defend Rights of Endangered Tibetans.

Black-necked cranes are seen in the Linzhou County, Tibet, Jan. 9, 2015. (Xinhua/Purbu Zhaxi)

Tibet Awareness. Defend Rights of Endangered Tibetans.

Black-necked crane chicks are seen in the Qiangtang nature reserve, Tibet, June 24, 2017. (Xinhua/Purbu Zhaxi)

Tibet Awareness. Defend Rights of Endangered Tibetans.

Black-necked cranes are seen in a reservoir where they spend the winter in Linzhou County of Lhasa City, capital of Tibet, in January of 2017. (Xinhua/Liu Dongjun)

Tibet Awareness. Defend Rights of Endangered Tibetans.

A black-necked crane looks after its chicks in the Qiangtang nature reserve, Tibet, June 24, 2017. (Xinhua/Purbu Zhaxi)

Tibet Awareness. Defend Rights of Endangered Tibetans.

Aerial photo taken on March 10, 2018 shows a black-necked crane in Linzhou County, Tibet. (Xinhua/Purbu Zhaxi)

Tibet Awareness. Defend Rights of Endangered Tibetans.

A black-necked crane, once wounded during migration, becomes a permanent resident at a temple near Xigaze, Tibet, Sept. 5, 2016. (Xinhua/Chogo)

Tibet Awareness. Defend Rights of Endangered Tibetans.

A black-necked crane family are seen near Yamdrok Lake,Tibet, Aug. 16, 2009. The little black-necked crane (C) broke the wing during migration, and the whole family became permanent residents after the little one’s recovery near the lake. (Xinhua/Purbu Zhaxi)

Tibet Awareness. Defend Rights of Endangered Tibetans.

Two black-necked cranes, wounded in wings during migration, are cared at a forestry authority in Dagze County, southwest China’s Tibet Autonomous Region, April 12, 2016. (Xinhua/Purbu Zhaxi)

Tibet Awareness. Defend Rights of Endangered Tibetans.

Black-necked cranes fly in the Linzhou County, Tibet, Jan. 9, 2015. (Xinhua/Purbu Zhaxi)

Tibet Awareness. Defend Rights of Endangered Tibetans.

Wildlife rangers are seen in the Qiangtang nature reserve, Tibet, Sept. 22, 2012. (Xinhua/Liu Hongming)

Tibet Awareness. Defend Rights of Endangered Tibetans.


Advertisements

Published by Bhavanajagat

Whole Man - Whole Theory: "I am Consciousness, Therefore I am" is my proposition to examine the reality of Man and the World in which he exists.

Leave a comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.