UNFINISHED VIETNAM WAR – THE ART OF KNOWING YOUR ENEMY – AMERICA’S ENEMY IN VIETNAM

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 UNFINISHED VIETNAM WAR – THE ART OF KNOWING YOUR ENEMY – AMERICA’S ENEMY IN VIETNAM

Unfinished Vietnam War – The Art of Knowing Your Enemy – America’s Enemy in Vietnam. The Enemy remains Undefeated. The Enemy is alive in Tibet.

 

In my analysis, Vietnam War remains “Unfinished.” Firstly, the United States must define the term “ENEMY” to Know Enemy. United States recognized the threat posed by Communism to wage War to arrest the spread of Communism in South Asia. For that reason, United States began Vietnam War in response to threat posed by Soviet Union and People’s Republic of China.

 

Unfinished Vietnam War – The Art of Knowing Your Enemy – America’s Enemy in Vietnam. The Enemy remains Undefeated. The Enemy is alive in Tibet.
Unfinished Vietnam War – The Art of Knowing Your Enemy – America’s Enemy in Vietnam. The Enemy remains Undefeated. The Enemy is alive in Tibet.
Unfinished Vietnam War – The Art of Knowing Your Enemy – America’s Enemy in Vietnam. The Enemy remains Undefeated. The Enemy is alive in Tibet.

The threat posed by Communism in Asia endures as Communists are still governing Tibet, the second largest nation of South Asia. United States has no choice other than that of Knowing People’s Republic of China as “ENEMY.” The Enemy remains Undefeated. The Enemy is alive, not in Vietnam, but in Tibet.

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada

SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE

NORTH VIETNAM AND PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF CHINA SIGN AID AGREEMENT ON AUGUST 07, 1967

Clipped from: http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/north-vietnam-and-peoples-republic-of-china-sign-aid-agreement?

Unfinished Vietnam War – The Art of Knowing Your Enemy – America’s Enemy in Vietnam. The faces of these North Vietnamese Soldiers do not truly depict the Face of Enemy in Vietnam. The Enemy remains Undefeated. The Enemy is alive in Tibet.

The North Vietnamese newspaper Nhan Dan reports that the People’s Republic of China (PRC) has signed a new agreement to give Hanoi an undisclosed amount of aid in the form of an outright grant.

Chinese support to the Communists in Vietnam had begun with their backing of the Vietminh in their war against the French. After the French were defeated, the PRC continued its support of the Hanoi regime. In April 1965, the PRC signed a formal agreement with Hanoi providing for the introduction of Chinese air defense, engineering, and railroad troops into North Vietnam to help maintain and expand lines of communication within North Vietnam. China later claimed that 320,000 of its troops served in North Vietnam during the period 1965 to 1971 and that 1,000 died there. It is estimated that the PRC provided over three-quarters of the total military aid given to North Vietnam during the war.

Cold War

1964

Congress passes Gulf of Tonkin Resolution

Vietnam War


Tonkin Gulf Resolution is passed

Unfinished Vietnam War – The Art of Knowing Your Enemy – America’s Enemy in Vietnam. The Enemy remains Undefeated. The Enemy is alive in Tibet.
Unfinished Vietnam War – The Art of Knowing Your Enemy – America’s Enemy in Vietnam. On August 07, 1964 US President Lyndon B. Johnson signed into Law, Gulf of Tonkin Resolution. The Enemy remains Undefeated. The Enemy is alive in Tibet.

The U.S. Congress passes Public Law 88-408, which becomes known as the Tonkin Gulf Resolution, giving President Johnson the power to take whatever actions he deems necessary to defend Southeast Asia including “the use of armed force.” The resolution passed 82-2 in the Senate.

Unfinished Vietnam War – The Art of Knowing Your Enemy – America’s Enemy in Vietnam. The Enemy remains Undefeated. The Enemy is alive in Tibet.
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