THE EVIL RED EMPIRE – RED CHINA – COLONIAL RULE OVER TIBET

Posted on Updated on

THE EVIL RED EMPIRE – RED CHINA – COLONIAL RULE OVER TIBET:

THE  EVIL  RED  EMPIRE  -  RED  CHINA  -  COLONIAL  RULE  OVER  TIBET .
THE EVIL RED EMPIRE – RED CHINA – COLONIAL RULE OVER TIBET .

Neocolonialism describes the revival of Colonialist exploitation by a foreign power of a region that has achieved independence. Colonialism is the system or policy by which a country maintains foreign colonies especially in order to exploit them economically. Colonization refers to  extension of political and economic control over an area by an occupying state that has organizational or technological superiority. Imperialism has been a major colonizing force. The Colony’s population is subdued to assimilate them to the Colonizer’s way of life.

The Great 13th Dalai Lama of Tibet declared Tibet’s independence from Manchu China(Qing or Ch’ing Dynasty) on February 13, 1913. Tibet expelled Manchu China’s diplomats and its military contingent posted in Lhasa, Tibet’s Capital. For centuries, Tibet came under foreign conquests by Mongols and Manchu China but Tibet was never colonized. Red China’s military invasion of Tibet in 1950 describes the typical features of Colonialism. Tibet’s population is repressed by brutal force in an attempt to fully assimilate Tibetans to the Colonizer’s way of life. Red China’s Colonial Rule is a direct threat to  existence of Tibetan way of life shaped by centuries of Natural Freedom. Apart from wiping out Tibetan System of Governance known as Ganden Phodrang, The Institution of Dalai Lama at Potala Palace, Lhasa, the tyrannical rule of Red China is destroying every attribute of Tibetan Culture including Tibetan language, and Tibetan religious institutions putting Tibetan Identity at a great peril. Red China’s colonization of Tibet is defacing and degrading Tibetan territory and its fragile environment totally upsetting its delicate ecological balance. The Land of Tibet is scarred by Red China’s reckless mining activities, deforestation, diversion of rivers, and dumping of toxic chemical and nuclear wastes.

THE  EVIL  RED  EMPIRE  -  RED  CHINA  -  COLONIAL  RULE  OVER  TIBET :  TIBET  IS  POISONED  WITH  LONGLIVING  NUCLEAR  WASTE  FROM  RED  CHINA'S  NUCLEAR  EXPANSIONISM .
THE EVIL RED EMPIRE – RED CHINA – COLONIAL RULE OVER TIBET : TIBET IS POISONED WITH LONG LIVING NUCLEAR WASTE FROM RED CHINA’S NUCLEAR EXPANSIONISM .

Colonization was the vehicle of European expansion from the 15th century into Africa, the Americas, and Asia. The Spanish, Portuguese, English, French, and Dutch established Colonies worldwide that have for the most part obtained independence from imperial system only in the 20th century.

red china neocolonialist mineral deposits tibet
red china neocolonialist mineral deposits Tibet
red china neocolonialist canadian mining projects tibet
red china neocolonialist Canadian mining projects Tibet

Red China determines the economic development of other countries from which it extracts vast amounts of raw materials. With the sole exception of Tibet, Red China is able to get raw materials and flood world markets with Made in China products without the need to fight the wars of the previous Colonial Era. With threats of its muscle power, Red China has entered a new era of Colonialism. People of the World have to awaken to the threat imposed by Red China – Neocolonialist.

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada
Ann Arbor, MI 48104-4162, USA
The Spirits of Special Frontier Force

image
The Spirits of Special Frontier ForceSpecial Frontier Force is a military organization of India, Tibet, United States to resist Red…
View on www.facebook.com Preview by Yahoo

CONGO ASSESSES $6.7 BILLION CONTRACTS WITH CHINESE

Congo assesses $6.7 billion contracts with Chinese

By SALEH MWANAMILONGO

In this photo taken on May 20, 2015, Chinese workers travel on the back of a trailer pulled by a tractor on their way to work in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo. Congo’s government is bringing in outside experts including officials from the World Bank and the United Nations, to investigate the long-term impact of some $6.7 billion in contracts with Chinese companies that critics have said could exploit the central African nation’s mineral riches.(AP Photo/John Bompengo)
.

  • In this photo taken on May 20, 2015, Chinese workers travel on the back of a trailer pulled by a tractor  on their way to work in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo.  Congo’s government is bringing in outside experts including officials from the World Bank and the United Nations, to investigate the long-term impact of some $6.7 billion in contracts with Chinese companies that critics have said could exploit the central African nation’s mineral riches.(AP Photo/John Bompengo)
    In this photo taken on May 20, 2015, Chinese workers travel on the back of a trailer pulled by a tractor on their way to work in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo. Congo’s government is bringing in outside experts including officials from the World Bank and the United Nations, to investigate the long-term impact of some $6.7 billion in contracts with Chinese companies that critics have said could exploit the central African nation’s mineral riches.(AP Photo/John Bompengo)

    .

  • In this photo taken on May 20, 2015, Chinese workers inside a new hotel being built for the use by  Congo government officials when completed in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo.  Congo’s government is bringing in outside experts including officials from the World Bank and the United Nations, to investigate the long-term impact of some $6.7 billion in contracts with Chinese companies that critics have said could exploit the central African nation’s mineral riches.(AP Photo/John Bompengo)
    In this photo taken on May 20, 2015, Chinese workers inside a new hotel being built for the use by Congo government officials when completed in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo. Congo’s government is bringing in outside experts including officials from the World Bank and the United Nations, to investigate the long-term impact of some $6.7 billion in contracts with Chinese companies that critics have said could exploit the central African nation’s mineral riches.(AP Photo/John Bompengo)

    In this photo taken on May 20, 2015, Chinese workers at the building site of a new hotel to be used by Congo government officials when completed in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo. Congo’s government is bringing in outside experts including officials from the World Bank and the United Nations, to investigate the long-term impact of some $6.7 billion in contracts with Chinese companies that critics have said could exploit the central African nation’s mineral riches. (AP Photo/John Bompengo)
    In this photo taken on May 20, 2015, Chinese workers at the building site of a new hotel to be used by Congo government officials when completed in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo. Congo’s government is bringing in outside experts including officials from the World Bank and the United Nations, to investigate the long-term impact of some $6.7 billion in contracts with Chinese companies that critics have said could exploit the central African nation’s mineral riches. (AP Photo/John Bompengo)
  • In this photo taken on May 20, 2015, Chinese workers travel on the back of a trailer pulled by a tractor on their way to work in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo. Congo’s government is bringing in outside experts including officials from the World Bank and the United Nations, to investigate the long-term impact of some $6.7 billion in contracts with Chinese companies that critics have said could exploit the central African nation’s mineral riches.(AP Photo/John Bompengo)
    In this photo taken on May 20, 2015, Chinese workers travel on the back of a trailer pulled by a tractor on their way to work in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo. Congo’s government is bringing in outside experts including officials from the World Bank and the United Nations, to investigate the long-term impact of some $6.7 billion in contracts with Chinese companies that critics have said could exploit the central African nation’s mineral riches.(AP Photo/John Bompengo)

    KINSHASA, Congo (AP) — Congo’s government is bringing in outside experts to investigate the long-term impact of some $6.7 billion in contracts with Chinese companies that critics say could exploit the central African nation’s mineral riches.

Congo’s government has a 32 percent stake while China has 68 percent in the mining project called Sicomines. It was created in 2008 but construction did not officially start until three years later, said Jean Nzenga Kongolo, deputy general manager of Sicomines.

It now employs about 3,000 people, of whom 70 percent are Congolese, said Kongolo.

To assess the project’s impact, officials from the World Bank and the United Nations visited the mines this week.

The project “is truly in the right lines and objectives of the World Bank which is to fight against poverty,” said World Bank representative Ahmadou Moustapha Ndiaye. The U.N. official also praised the project.

However, critics say a more thorough evaluation of the contract still must be done.

In this photo taken on May 20, 2015, Chinese workers at the building site of a new hotel to be used by Congo government officials when completed in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo. Congo’s government is bringing in outside experts including officials from the World Bank and the United Nations, to investigate the long-term impact of some $6.7 billion in contracts with Chinese companies that critics have said could exploit the central African nation’s mineral riches.(AP Photo/John Bompengo)
In this photo taken on May 20, 2015, Chinese workers at the building site of a new hotel to be used by Congo government officials when completed in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo. Congo’s government is bringing in outside experts including officials from the World Bank and the United Nations, to investigate the long-term impact of some $6.7 billion in contracts with Chinese companies that critics have said could exploit the central African nation’s mineral riches.(AP Photo/John Bompengo)

In this photo taken on May 20, 2015, Chinese workers at the building site of a new hotel to be used by Congo government officials in Kinshasa.

“The Chinese contract was never a win-win … It was badly negotiated,” said civil society leader Jonas Tshiombela.

As part of the deal, China’s Railway Engineering Corporation and Sinohydro Corp. are constructing about 3,000 kilometers of roads and railways in Congo. Universities, hospitals and health centers are also being built, according to the agreement.

Tshiombela said the quality of the construction work “leaves much to be desired.” One road in the capital of Kinshasa — Sendwe Boulevard — already has potholes just a year after it was completed, he said.

Sun Rui Wen, the director general representing China’s interest in Sicomines, defended the project, saying it is based on “equality and mutual benefit.”

The deal also allows the Chinese companies to mine copper, cobalt and gold, according to the agreement seen by The Associated Press.

Congo should be able to repay the investment after 25 years, said Moise Ekanga Lushyma, executive secretary coordinating the project for the Congolese government. At that point they will pay management fees or negotiate another loan — not necessarily with the Chinese — to produce minerals, he said.

  • KINSHASA, Congo

World Bank

Copyright 2015 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Yahoo – ABC News Network

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s