Tibet Awareness – Not Part of China

THE LIVING TIBETAN SPIRITS WILL NOT BE TAKEN IN BY CHINESE LIES

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THE LIVING TIBETAN SPIRITS WILL NOT BE TAKEN IN BY CHINESE LIES

The Living Tibetan Spirits will not be taken in by Chinese lies.

The Living Tibetan Spirits will not be taken in by Chinese lies. China’s military conquest of Tibet cannot be described as ‘Peaceful Liberation’. China’s ‘Socialist System’ cannot conceal the fact of Tibet’s Colonization. China’s Information Warfare aims to subjugate Tibet by compromising Tibetan Identity in every conceivable manner. The Living Tibetan Spirits asks the global community to reject China’s Diabolical Campaign of Lies, Deception, Wickedness, and Cunningness.

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada

SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE

https://wholedude.com/2015/10/18/tibet-awareness-red-china-liar/

The Living Tibetan Spirits will not be taken in by Chinese lies.

China warns Tibetans not to be taken in ahead of Dalai Lama anniversary

Clipped from: https://www.reuters.com/article/us-china-tibet-idUSKBN1OD098

BEIJING (Reuters) – The people of Tibet should not be taken in by the Dalai Lama’s lies and clearly understand the importance of Communist Party rule in the region, the Chinese government said ahead of March’s sensitive 60th anniversary of him fleeing into exile.

The Living Tibetan Spirits will not be taken in by Chinese lies.

Tibetan spiritual leader, the Dalai Lama, speaks to students at a school in Mumbai, India, December 8, 2017. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui/File Photo

Beijing sent troops into Tibet in 1950 in what it officially terms a peaceful liberation and has ruled there with an iron fist ever since.

The Dalai Lama, the highest figure in Tibetan Buddhism, fled into exile to India in 1959 after a failed uprising against Chinese rule.

China routinely denounces him as a dangerous separatist, although the Dalai Lama says he merely wants genuine autonomy for his remote and mountainous homeland.

The official Tibet Daily said in a lengthy commentary released online late on Thursday the 83-year-old Dalai Lama had never given up promoting Tibetan independence, dismissing his intentions to seek a “middle way” of genuine autonomy.

“Whether it’s the ‘middle way’ or a ‘high degree of autonomy’, the aim is to try to negate the leadership of the party, negate the socialist system, and negate the ethnic autonomous region system,” the paper wrote.

It said the Dalai Lama has tried to use hostile forces in the Western media to spread his “rumors and slander” against China to promote Tibetan independence, ignoring the freedoms and respect accorded to the people of Tibet.

“In the face of the lies of the 14th Dalai Lama, the various people of Tibet should be even more aware that socialist new Tibet replacing the theistic and feudal system of old Tibet was a historical necessity, and a victory for the truth and the people,” the paper wrote.

The head of the Tibetan-government-in-exile based in northern India denounced the criticism of the Dalai Lama and said he was the solution to the Tibetan problem because most Tibetans accept him as their leader.

“Intimidation and fear are not the ways to govern Tibetans. Even after 60 years of occupation, the Chinese government is using these techniques,” Lobsang Sangay told Reuters in the hill station of Dharamsala.

The Dalai Lama on Friday gave a lecture in Mumbai on ancient Indian knowledge but did not directly mention current relations with China.

“Violence always brings suffering,” he said, in comments streamed live on his Facebook page. “Basic human nature is more compassionate.”

Sangay said the Dalai Lama’s middle way was a win-win situation seeking autonomy for the Tibetans within the framework of the Chinese constitution and called for talks between his envoys and the representatives of the Chinese government to address the 60-year-old issue.

DIFFICULT SITUATION

Rights groups say the situation for ethnic Tibetans inside what China calls the Tibet Autonomous Region remains extremely difficult.

The U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights said in June conditions were “fast deteriorating” in Tibet.

This week, the U.S. Senate passed the Reciprocal Access to Tibet Act, which now goes to the White House for President Donald Trump to sign into law.

That act seeks to promote access to Tibet for U.S. diplomats and other officials, journalists, and other citizens by denying entry into the United States for Chinese officials deemed responsible for restricting access to Tibet.

Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Lu Kang said the bill was an interference in China’s domestic affairs and they had already made “stern representations” to the United States about it.

Many foreigners visit Tibet every year, with almost 40,000 trips by Americans there since 2015, including by senior U.S. politicians, showing there was no reason for this bill, he told a daily news briefing.

China urges the United States to prevent the bill becoming law to avoid harming bilateral relations, Lu added.

All foreigners need special permission to enter Tibet, which is generally granted for tourists but very infrequently for foreign diplomats and journalists.

Reporting by Ben Blanchard; Additional reporting by Christian Shepherd, and Abhishek Madhukar in DHARAMSALA, India; Editing by Sanjeev Miglani

The Living Tibetan Spirits will not be taken in by Chinese lies.

 

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TIBET AWARENESS ON WORLD HUMAN RIGHTS DAY, DECEMBER 10, 2018

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TIBET AWARENESS ON WORLD HUMAN RIGHTS DAY, DECEMBER 10, 2018

TIBET AWARENESS ON WORLD HUMAN RIGHTS DAY.

To celebrate observance of World Human Rights Day on December 10, 2018, I speak about Tibet’s yoking with Red China. This yoking, coming together, or joining of Red China with Tibet speaks of Subjection, Bondage, Servitude, Enslavement, Hardship, Burden, Trouble, Pain, Suffering, Sorrow, and Misery. Tibetans resist this burden imposed upon their Natural Freedom. Tibet is under Control, and Tibet is Subdued under burden imposed by Red China’s Yoke. We need to help Tibet to make it a safe place for Tibetans to live reaping the Blessings of Peace, Freedom and Justice granted by Mother Nature.

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada
Ann Arbor, MI 48104-4162 USA
SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE

 
 

TIBET AWARENESS ON WORLD HUMAN RIGHTS DAY, DECEMBER 10, 2018.

 
 

TIBET AWARENESS ON WORLD HUMAN RIGHTS DAY, DECEMBER 10, 2018.

 
 

TIBET AWARENESS ON WORLD HUMAN RIGHTS DAY, DECEMBER 10, 2018.

 
 

Tibet Awareness on World Human Rights Day, December 10, 2018.

 
 

Tibet Awareness on World Human Rights Day, December 10, 2018.

Tibet Awareness on World Human Rights Day, December 10, 2018.

Tibet Awareness on World Human Rights Day, December 10, 2018.

 
 

THE DISCOVERY OF TIBET – THE ORIGIN OF ANATOMICALLY MODERN MAN

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THE DISCOVERY OF TIBET – THE ORIGIN OF ANATOMICALLY MODERN MAN

The Discovery of Tibet. The Origin of Anatomically Modern Man.

Indian literary traditions suggest that the Anatomically Modern Man may have originated in Tibet. The Tibetan Man exists as a distinct member of Modern Human Family. Tibet and Tibetan Man do not share the identity of China and the Han Chinese Man. While Tibet is one of the most sparsely populated areas of the world, the origin of Anatomically Modern Man can be discovered in Tibet as the rest of the world hosted other members of Hominin Family that disappeared with the arrival of Homo sapiens. Sapiens as a new subspecies of Homo sapiens.

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada

BHAVANAJAGAT.ORG

https://wholedude.com/2018/09/19/the-story-of-tibet-relates-to-the-origin-of-man/

Tibet Discovery Suggests Humans Inhabited ‘Roof of the World’ Far Earlier Than Believed

By Pam Wright

November 30 2018 12:46 PM EDT

weather.com

The Discovery of Tibet. The Origin of Anatomically Modern Man.

Excavations at the site of Nwya Devu in central Tibet.

(Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology)

At a Glance

  • A team of researchers says humans first set foot on the interior of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau around 30,000 to 40,000 years ago.
  • That’s about 20,000 earlier than previously thought.

The discovery of 3,600 stone artifacts in Tibet’s high plateau suggests humans inhabited one of the earth’s harshest environments far earlier than previously thought.

According to a paper published this week in Science magazine, a team of researchers from the Chinese Academy of Sciences says humans first set foot on the interior of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau around 30,000 to 40,000 years ago, which is some 20,000 years earlier than previously believed.

Most archeologists contended that humans first set foot on the plateau about 20,000 or 30,000 years ago but did not settle permanently until 6,000 or 7,000 years ago.

According to archeological evidence, the region is one of the last habitats colonized by Homo sapiens, which is not surprising considering the harsh conditions.

“The high altitude, atmospheric hypoxia, cold year-round temperatures and low rainfall of the plateau creates an extremely challenging environment for human habitation,” according to a press release.

The plateau is known as the “roof of the world” and remains the third least-populated place on Earth.

The Discovery of Tibet. The Origin of Anatomically Modern Man.

Stone artifacts on the surface.

(Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology)

The team confirmed the timeline after finding stone artifacts at the Nwya Devu Paleolithic site located 15,000 feet above sea level in the Changthang region of northern Tibet.

The artifacts discovered were buried undisturbed underground, reliably confirming their age.

“It really is the first robust case to be made that there were human populations on the high plateau,” Jeff Brantingham, an archaeologist at the University of California, Los Angeles, who studies the peopling of the Tibetan Plateau but was not involved with this study, told National Geographic.

Interestingly, no DNA was found on the stone tools, so it is difficult to determine who made them.

“The authors used the word ‘Tibetan’ a lot, and they act as if the people they’re looking at are in fact Tibetans — they’re not,” National Geographic explorer Mark Aldenderfer, an archaeologist at the University of California, Merced, told the magazine. “We don’t know who these people were.”

Some studies indicate most modern Tibetan ancestry traces back to a population

that separated from the Han Chinese roughly 9,000 years ago.

The archaeologists at the Nwya Devu say the tools are nearly identical to tools recovered from Mongolia and Xinjiang.

The site is about 186 miles northwest of Lhasa, the capital of Tibet, and is the oldest and highest early Stone Age (Paleolithic) archaeological site known on Earth.

The Weather Company’s primary journalistic mission is to report on breaking weather news, the environment and the importance of science to our lives. This story does not necessarily represent the position of our parent company, IBM.

© Copyright TWC Product and Technology LLC 2014, 2018

The Discovery of Tibet. The Origin of Anatomically Modern Man.

THE LIVING TIBETAN SPIRITS MAKE A DREAM TRIP TO MOUNT EVEREST

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THE LIVING TIBETAN SPIRITS MAKE A DREAM TRIP TO MOUNT EVEREST

The Living Tibetan Spirits Make a Dream Trip to Mount Everest.

As my miserable mortal life journey crawls towards its end without giving me any clue about my destination, I can only afford to make a dream trip to Mount Everest. I give my thanks to photographer Bruce Connolly and ChinaDaily.com.Cn for sharing with me the story about ‘A Road Trip Across Tibet to Mount Everest’. In my analysis, Mount Everest or Qomolangma is my mighty witness testifying in support of true Tibetan Identity. Mount Everest proclaims that Tibet is never a part of China.

 

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada

SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE 

https://wholedude.com/2017/06/27/tibet-awareness-unequal-yoking/ 

A road trip across Tibet to Mount Everest

Clipped from: http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/a/201811/30/WS5c00a0e7a310eff30328c06b_1.html

The Living Tibetan Spirits Make a Dream Trip to Mount Everest.

Lhasa – the start of the road trip in 2000. [Photo by Bruce Connolly/chinadaily.com.cn]

In 2000, Lhasa was a different city in many ways, compared to what it is today. High on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, it was much more isolated back then. Its airport, a roughly 90-minute drive from downtown, was at that time the only one operating across all of Tibet. In earlier years, flying into Lhasa had been restricted to early morning flights from Chengdu in Sichuan. By 2000, however, it was well-served by modern, powerful jet aircraft capable of landings and takeoffs at high altitudes, able to cope with occasionally difficult afternoon weather conditions. In recent years several new airports have also opened across Tibet.

Despite the advances in aviation technology, flying into Tibet was expensive. Before the completion of the Tibet railway in 2006, roads were the only feasible option for most freight and passenger traffic. It amazed me during my time in Lhasa how so much that made my stay both pleasant and comfortable must surely have come up to the city by road. Two main highways served Lhasa at the time. From Golmud to Xining, Highway G109 was a long, lonely journey through an empty upland plateau. The other route, Highway G318, runs 5,476 kilometers from Shanghai’s People’s Square, via Sichuan and southeastern Tibet ultimately to Zhangmu, the border crossing with Nepal. I would leave Lhasa along G318 on a road trip initially to the base of Qomolangma, known in the West as Mount Everest.

I noticed several oxygen bags loaded into what was a comfortable but strong SUV. Lhasa was modern and well-planned, but outside the city, infrastructure such as road quality was quite variable. The physical terrain often proved very challenging for highway construction, even between Lhasa and Xigaze, Tibet’s second city. Geologically, much of the area is still active. Landslides remained a danger during the rainy season.

The Living Tibetan Spirits Make a Dream Trip to Mount Everest.

Highway 318 at Tingri. [Photo by Bruce Connolly/chinadaily.com.cn]

Initially, my departure from Lhasa along G318 followed the road that had brought me a few days earlier from the airport. Nearing the Yarlung Tsangpo Bridge, we turned right for Xigaze. Initially, the route followed a wide valley and the river braided into many channels, with sweeping views toward glacial mountain peaks and ridges. Villages sat near intensively cultivated, irrigated farmland. Then it started narrowing, with scenery becoming increasingly breathtaking. Settlements perched on any patches of level terrain available.

The road started along a ledge cut below almost vertical cliffs. High gullies were filled with long fingers of snow. Below the road, sheer drops reached the river that appeared to be cascading around huge rocks. Workers tirelessly cleared fallen boulders from roadside ditches. Flocks of sheep and goats also shared the road space, with drivers carefully edging past. Gradually the valley widened, and the river slowed, allowing flat-bottomed ferry boats to carry villagers across. Both road width and quality improved. Where bridges spanned river junctions, small restaurants and shops had opened, providing supplies for travelers. At intervals, pack horses gathered beside narrow trails leading to seemingly inaccessible villages.

The Living Tibetan Spirits Make a Dream Trip to Mount Everest.

Eventually, the valley really did widen and the waters calmed, becoming almost lake-like. A tugboat pulled a pontoon carrying vehicles across to the far shore. Some of the landscape appeared as a small sandy desert with protective trees planted along the highway. I noticed poles being erected to carry electricity to some villages while concrete-lined aqueducts helped irrigate reclaimed land for arable farming.

Rounding a bend, I saw a concentration of modern buildings, some even medium-rise. We arrived at Xigaze, at an altitude of 3,836 meters, the highest city I had ever reached. Since that 2000 road trip, travel to and from Xigaze has greatly improved. Not only has the road been upgraded but the railway has been extended from Lhasa and a modern airport opened. Partly in response to such infrastructure investments, tourism has grown significantly, not just to Xigaze but across much of Tibet.

I stayed at the Xigaze-Shandong Hotel, which then was the city’s tallest building. I discovered at that time a certain arrangement existed, where the more developed parts of China were paired up with areas of Tibet to assist in regional assistance programs such as infrastructure projects. Xigaze had relationships with Shanghai and Shandong, Lhasa with Beijing, and so on.

It was an unexpected joy to find excellent accommodation in what in theory was then a remote location. After a spicy Sichuan-style lunch in the hotel, I spent the afternoon visiting Tashilhunpo Monastery. Founded in 1447, it was the traditional seat of the Panchen Lama — Panchen meaning “great scholar”, the title bestowed on the abbots of Tashilhunpo.

I was spellbound by the magnificence of the monastery as I walked through its halls illuminated by trays of butter lamps. One chapel was home to a 26-meter-high copper image of the Maitreya, or Buddha of the future. Around the walls were around 1,000 gold paintings of the Maitreya.

Within an assembly hall dating from the 15th century, chanting monks sat on carpets while above them long thangka images and colored scarves hung from the ceiling. A large throne in the middle was where the Panchen Lamas once sat.

The Living Tibetan Spirits Make a Dream Trip to Mount Everest.

A doorway within Tashilhunpo Monastery Xigaze. [Photo by Bruce Connolly/chinadaily.com.cn]

I wandered the alleys between prayer halls crowded by people chanting, prostrating themselves, walking clockwise along balconies or spinning personal prayer wheels. Some, along with young monks, scooped up chunks of butter from large bowls and smeared it into lamp bowls. The butter produced a distinctive aroma that seemed to permeate everywhere. Above the monastery’s perimeter wall, people quietly followed the Tashilhunpo Kora (pilgrimage).

That evening I tried writing in my diary but found it a challenge because I had experienced so much throughout the day. I did realize that this hotel would offer the last comfortable bed for the next few days, as there were no more cities ahead on this route, with only small trading towns and to look forward to.

Leaving Xigaze early next morning, I saw many people already walking around the monastery. The road was initially unpaved, passing many exposed multicolored rock formations that stood as a testament to the massive tectonic movements that had uplifted the area’s geology. The land became increasingly dry with small patches of cultivation, mostly barley and potatoes, where water could be sourced. Occasionally someone on horseback would tend herds of black-coated yaks.

The Living Tibetan Spirits Make a Dream Trip to Mount Everest.

Villages. Photo by Bruce Connolly/ChinaDaily.com.Cn

The road would climb up and over several passes usually crowned with prayer flags, such as the 4,500-meter-high Tso-La Pass and the 4,950 meter-high Yulang-La Pass. The visibility was so clear, giving excellent views of distant peaks. At one point I saw the heavy walls of what had been a fort guarding a pass. Descending, lower areas would have limited cultivation, although I did observe groups of farmers scattering seed potatoes onto plowed soil. Ponies pulled wooden carts along the farmers.

Along G318 there also was a regular procession of blue trucks laden with goods, for this road was also the main lifeline to western Tibet.

Some 150 kilometers from Xigaze is Lhaze, a small county whose main street had many small restaurants with name boards in English such as “Chengdu Restaurant”, for it was where G318 to the Nepalese border splits from the highway to western Tibet. Apparently, travelers heading up toward Mount Everest maybe would stay one or two nights, for it was the last real town on the route.

The Living Tibetan Spirits Make a Dream Trip to Mount Everest.

Rongphu Monastery at 5030 meters. [Photo by Bruce Connolly/chinadaily.com.cn]

The road climbed again up a narrow valley where herders would camp while tending their yaks. This led up to Gyatso-La Pass, at an altitude of 5,220 meters, one of the highest along the route. Stopping briefly, I thought it was amazing how people gathered around, yet there was no sign of any habitation. The landscape felt like arctic tundra vegetation, and beyond it, I could finally see the snow-capped peaks of the Himalayas. However, clouds were building up over those peaks for the monsoon would soon push up from the Indian sub-continent. In this area, the road was not surfaced and it was a constant struggle for work crews to keep it open.

When we reached distance marker 5,115, a sign declared we were entering the Mount Everest Protection Area. Scattered trees indicated the approach toward a small village, Tingri, where the main road turned off to Shegar. Notices proclaiming “guesthouse” and restaurant adorned building exteriors signaled the area was used to visitors. I had lunch in a restaurant that amazingly had television, hi-fi, and a fridge! Boys tried to sell fossils dug up locally while people gathered for onward transport by truck or bus.

Soon after the village was the 63-kilometer route leading up to Mount Everest. As we drove gradually higher, I was enthralled with the geology exposed everywhere, often showing bedding planes of the rocks tilted vertically. That gravel road gradually climbed up through a wide valley with an increasing sensation of being on the roof of the world as we reached the 5,120-meter-high summit of Pang-La Pass. Beyond it lay one of the most spectacular views in the world. Along the horizon stood the glacial peaks of the Himalayas, with Mount Everest, or Qomolangma, at the center. It was so stunning I could easily have stayed there all day.

The Living Tibetan Spirits Make a Dream Trip to Mount Everest.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A wide section of Yarlung Tsangpo near Xigaze. [Photo by Bruce Connolly/chinadaily.com.cn]

From the summit, the road descended through a moon-like landscape reaching a small agricultural village, Tashi Dzom. Notices again in English advertised accommodation and dining. Turning right into a broad valley, we encountered a river spreading over a wide terrain of gravel and stones, which was actually meltwater draining off the northern slopes of Mount Everest. Jeeps carrying tourists descended as we headed higher, passing Chodzom, possibly the world’s highest village, again offering a hotel built in a local Tibetan style. The route went up through boulder fields, the descending river now milky white as it carried so much gravel and crushed stones. At an altitude of 5,030 meters sat Rongphu Monastery, the last inhabited building before the base of Mount Everest. I would stay there overnight, but first, the last section of the road had to be skillfully accomplished.

The going was extremely rough, bumping over many rocks and glacial debris while driving through streams. Great mounds of stones and silt had been carried down and deposited by the Rongphu Glacier. Reaching the road’s end, I found myself lacking the energy to manage anything beyond a slow walk up a gravelly hill. There was no vegetation on this stark landscape, but it was very inspiring. My only disappointment was that Everest was wrapped in clouds. It was windy and felt very cold.

The Living Tibetan Spirits Make a Dream Trip to Mount Everest.

Across the high, arctic, plateau lands. [Photo by Bruce Connolly/chinadaily.com.cn]

I returned to the guesthouse for a simple meal of egg fried rice and pot noodles, and went to bed, trying to sleep, an almost impossible task. This proved fortuitous. As dawn was breaking I went outside for a glimpse of the grandeur of Mount Everest exposed before me. I sat on a rock trying to take it all in, the world’s highest peak. At last, I had arrived at this breathtaking vista, which I had seen so many times in books from years back. Within 30 minutes the clouds once again enveloped it!

I enjoyed a simple breakfast, and then weathered a bumpy descent as villages such as Chodzom were waking up. I watched people heading out to the fields, some by horseback, and children going to school.

Back over the Pang-La Pass, with its many prayer flags, it felt like time for a memorable look back toward Mount Everest, sadly almost obscured by clouds. Soon we returned back to the G318, stopping for lunch at Tingri before arriving in Xigaze once again. I had accomplished an incredible journey, thanks in part to the amazing skills of my Tibetan driver.

The Living Tibetan Spirits Make a Dream Trip to Mount Everest.

Amazing colors of the land alongside the highway. [Photo by Bruce Connolly/chinadaily.com.cn]

The Living Tibetan Spirits Make a Dream Trip to Mount Everest.

Dawn over Mount Everest – thirty minutes later it clouded over. [Photo by Bruce Connolly/chinadaily.com.cn]

The Living Tibetan Spirits Make a Dream Trip to Mount Everest.

End of the road to Everest. [Photo by Bruce Connolly/chinadaily.com.cn]

The Living Tibetan Spirits Make a Dream Trip to Mount Everest.

Glacial meltwater river from Mount Everest. [Photo by Bruce Connolly/chinadaily.com.cn]

The Living Tibetan Spirits Make a Dream Trip to Mount Everest.

Groups of monks at Tashilhunpo Monastery Xigaze. [Photo by Bruce Connolly/chinadaily.com.cn ]

The Living Tibetan Spirits Make a Dream Trip to Mount Everest.

Highway 318 to Xigaze along Yarlung Tsangpo River. [Photo by Bruce Connolly/chinadaily.com.cn]

The Living Tibetan Spirits Make a Dream Trip to Mount Everest.

Incredible geological formations alongside road up to Pang-la Pass. [Photo by Bruce Connolly/chinadaily.com.cn]

The Living Tibetan Spirits Make a Dream Trip to Mount Everest.

Pang-la Pass 5120 meters. Looking towards the Himalayan foothills. [Photo by Bruce Connolly/chinadaily.com.cn]

The Living Tibetan Spirits Make a Dream Trip to Mount Everest.

Prayer flags on high passes along the highway. [Photo by Bruce Connolly/chinadaily.com.cn]

The Living Tibetan Spirits Make a Dream Trip to Mount Everest.

Rough driving on G318 and a former fort above the road. [Photo by Bruce Connolly/chinadaily.com.cn]

The Living Tibetan Spirits Make a Dream Trip to Mount Everest.

Villages along the road to Everest. [Photo by Bruce Connolly/chinadaily.com.cn]

The Living Tibetan Spirits Make a Dream Trip to Mount Everest.

Villages and a mill where there was water. [Photo by Bruce Connolly/chinadaily.com.cn]

The Living Tibetan Spirits Make a Dream Trip to Mount Everest.

 

TIBET SEPARATISM IS JUST A NATURAL PHENOMENON

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TIBET SEPARATISM IS JUST A NATURAL PHENOMENON

Tibet Separatism is just a Natural Phenomenon.

In my analysis, Tibet Separatism is just a natural phenomenon for it is entirely derived from the actions of various Natural Forces acting over thousands of years to create the separate Tibetan Identity which refuses to merge with identities of other foreign nationalities. Tibetan Identity will always exist as a ‘Separate’ Identity and no man will be able to wipe it out by building roads, bridges, railways, airports to plunder the natural resources of Tibetan Plateau. Tibetan Separatism does not constitute any kind of political activity. In fact, Tibetan Separatism represents the reality of Independence granted by the works of Mother Nature.

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada

SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE

https://wholedude.com/2017/06/12/what-is-tibet-equilibrium/

Dalai Lama a political exile, engaged in separatist activities: China | world news | Hindustan Times

Clipped from: https://www.hindustantimes.com/world-news/dalai-lama-a-political-exile-engaged-in-separatist-activities-china/story-EHWnzYS5nauR7R8bynYhGP.html

China insists Tibet has been part of its territory for centuries, but many Tibetans claim they were essentially independent for most of that time

Press Trust of India

Beijing

Tibet Separatism is just a Natural Phenomenon.

Tibetan spiritual leader Dalai Lama interacts with the leaders of the United States Institute of Peace (USIP) at his residence, in Dharamshala, Himachal Pradesh, on October 24. (HT File Photo)

China on Tuesday hit out at the Dalai Lama who is on a visit to Japan, saying that countries should not facilitate the Tibetan spiritual leader’s “separatist activities”.

On the Dalai Lama’s reported comments that China and Tibet should co-exist and prosper together, Chinese foreign ministry spokesman Geng Shuang said here that the Tibet issue is an internal matter of Beijing.

“As for the Dalai Lama’s speech, it is not up to me to answer this question. I can tell you that the 14th Dalai Lama is a political exile and he is engaged in separatist activities,” he said.

“We hope the relevant parties will not provide facilitation for his separatist activities,” he said.

China insists Tibet has been part of its territory for centuries, but many Tibetans claim they were essentially independent for most of that time. The Dalai Lama fled to India in 1959 amid an abortive uprising against Chinese rule in his Himalayan homeland.

The Dalai Lama is on a 10-day teaching tour of Japan. China routinely objects to his foreign visits.

First Published: Nov 20, 2018 18:24 IST

Tibet Separatism is just a Natural Phenomenon.


TIBET AWARENESS – TIBET IS THE CORE ISSUE FOR INDIA

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TIBET AWARENESS – TIBET IS THE CORE ISSUE FOR INDIA

 
 

There should be no border dispute between India and the People’s Republic of China as they do not share a common border. The problem of China’s military occupation of Tibet should be addressed by the global community of nations to secure Peace, Security, and Justice in South Asia.

 
 

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada

SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE

https://wholedude.com/2015/08/05/tibets-military-occupation-the-great-tibet-problem/

 
 

Tibet should be one of the core issues for India, says Lobsang Sangay, the head of Tibetan Government-in-Exile

 
 

Clipped from: https://www.financialexpress.com/world-news/tibet-should-be-one-of-the-core-issues-for-india-says-lobsang-sangay-the-head-of-tibetan-government-in-exile/1384094/

Tibet should be one of the core issues for India as China is trying to “influence” all of its neighbours, Lobsang Sangay, the head of the Tibetan government in exile has said.

Tibet should be one of the core issues for India, says Lobsang Sangay (Reuters)

Tibet should be one of the core issues for India as China is trying to “influence” all of its neighbours, Lobsang Sangay, the head of the Tibetan government in exile has said. China insists Tibet has been part of its territory for centuries, but many Tibetans say they were essentially independent for most of that time. The Dalai Lama fled to India in 1959 amid an abortive uprising against Chinese rule in his Himalayan homeland.

Sangay, who is currently here, has met several senior US administration officials, congressmen and senators and members of the think-tank community like the Hudson Institute. Explaining his quest for India making “Tibet a core issue”, Harvard educated Sangay said that after the occupation of Tibet, the People’s Liberation Army has now moved near the border of India.

“Now they are influencing all of India’s neighbours, from Pakistan, to Sri Lanka, Bangladesh and Nepal. It is a reality now,” he said in an interview to PTI.

India and Tibet have had historically, cultural and civilizational ties for hundreds of years, he said, adding Tibet is the source of water for India and South Asia. “For these reasons, Tibet is very important for not just India, for whole of South Asia and ASEAN countries too. Hence, Tibet should be one of the core issues for India,” Sangay said.

“China has already said Tibet is one of the core issues. So, India should also table Tibet as one of the core issues and address this issue with Tibetan people in mind,” he said. Responding to a question, Sangay said that the people of Tibet are following the middle way approach by seeking “genuine autonomy within the framework of the Chinese constitution”. “This is the reasonable moderate line,” he said.

For that there should be a dialogue between the envoys of the Dalai Lama and the Chinese Government, he said. He sought the revival of a dialogue that happened between 2002 to 2010. “We think, that kind of dialogue will lead to the resolution of the Tibetan issue,” he said.

 
 

A TIME TO SOW AND A TIME TO REAP IN OCCUPIED TIBET

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A TIME TO SOW AND A TIME TO REAP IN OCCUPIED TIBET

There is a time for every purpose under heaven. After defeat in 1950, I am waiting for heaven’s appointed time for victory in Tibet.

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada

SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE

https://wholedude.com/2015/08/20/tibet-awareness-tibets-quest-for-full-independence/

HIGHLAND BARLEY IN TIBET ENTERS HARVEST SEASON

Clipped from: http://www.ecns.cn/hd/2018-09-20/detail-ifyyehna1447995.shtml#

A farmer inspects highland barley in Lhaze County of Xigaze, Tibet, Sept. 13, 2018. The highland barley in Tibet is entering harvest season. (Xinhua/Purbu Zhaxi)

A farmer harvests highland barley in Lhaze County of Xigaze, Tibet, Sept. 13, 2018. The highland barley in Tibet is entering harvest season. (Xinhua/Purbu Zhaxi)

A Time to Reap in Occupied Tibet.

An aerial photo shows farmers reaping highland barley in Lhaze County of Xigaze, Tibet, Sept. 13, 2018. The highland barley in Tibet is entering harvest season. (Xinhua/Purbu Zhaxi)

A Time to Reap in Occupied Tibet.

A farmer harvests highland barley in Caina Township in Quxu County of Lhasa, Tibet, Sept. 16, 2018. The highland barley in Tibet is entering harvest season. (Xinhua/Purbu Zhaxi)

A Time to Reap in Occupied Tibet

A farmer reaps highland barley in Lhunzhub County of Lhasa, Tibet, Sept. 3, 2018. The highland barley in Tibet is entering harvest season. (Xinhua/Purbu Zhaxi)

A Time to Reap in Occupied Tibet.

Farmers reap highland barley in Lhunzhub County of Lhasa, Tibet, Sept. 3, 2018. The highland barley in Tibet is entering harvest season. (Xinhua/Purbu Zhaxi)

A Time to Reap in Occupied Tibet.

An aerial photo shows highland barley fields in Nagarze Town in Nagarze County of Shannan, Tibet, Sept. 13, 2018. The highland barley in Tibet is entering harvest season. (Xinhua/Purbu Zhaxi)