Special Frontier Force-US-India-Tibet

DOOMED US – CHINA FOREIGN POLICY POSES THREAT TO REPUBLIC OF INDIA

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DOOMED US – CHINA FOREIGN POLICY POSES THREAT TO REPUBLIC OF INDIA

Republic of India since its birth got ensnared by Doomed US Foreign Policy. United States and UK support Pakistan to undermine India’s position and to balance the power and influence of Soviet Union/Russia. This poisonous policy has driven India to seek cooperation of Soviet Union/Russia as India is left with no alternative to neutralize Pakistan’s enhanced military power.

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To add insult to India’s injury, US cultivated relationship with Communist China using Pakistan. Dr. Henry Kissinger launched that illicit relationship during 1971 flying to Peking from Pakistan. China took full advantage of Pakistan’s relationship and is able to fully manipulate Pakistan outplaying the US influence. On Kashmir front, as of today, India is facing threat posed by three enemies; 1. US, 2. China, and 3. Pakistan.

My concern is not about UN Support for China’s Project. The real danger comes from Doomed US Foreign Policy.

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada
Ann Arbor, MI 48104-4162 USA
SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE

UN support China’s CPEC project passing through PoK puts India’s claim in jeopardy

Sunday, March 19, 2017
By: Hindustan Times

Source Link: Click Here

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A UN Security Council resolution has for the first time incorporated China’s Belt and Road Initiative (BRI), a multi-billion inter-continental connectivity mission that has a flagship project passing through Pakistan occupied Kashmir (PoK).

The resolution, which extends an ongoing UN assistance mission to Afghanistan, says international efforts should be strengthened to implement the BRI, President Xi Jinping’s legacy project about which he first spoke in 2013.

Beijing claims it has rounded up at least 100 countries in BRI’s support, including Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka.

India is yet to sign up for the initiative. Foreign secretary S Jaishankar spelt it out to the Chinese government in February that India has a “sovereignty” issue with the BRI because its flagship project, the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC), passes through PoK. According to diplomats, India endorsing the BRI would mean giving up its claims on PoK.

The UN endorsing the BRI could complicate the situation as far as India’s claims are concerned.

The resolution in question renewed the mandate of the UN Assistance Mission in Afghanistan for one year. In it, the 15-nation UN body urged to promote security and stability in Afghanistan and the region “to create a community of shared future for mankind”.

“Also included in the newly adopted council resolution was China’s Belt and Road Initiative, which aims to build a trade and infrastructure network connecting Asia with Europe and Africa along the ancient trade routes,” official news agency Xinhua reported.

The resolution “welcomes and urges further efforts to strengthen the process of regional economic cooperation, including measures to facilitate regional connectivity, trade and transit, including through regional development initiatives such as the Silk Road Economic Belt and the 21st-Century Maritime Silk Road (the Belt and Road) Initiative”.

The council resolution urged “further international efforts to strengthen regional cooperation and implement the Belt and Road Initiative”.

Besides the BRI, the resolution also mentions other projects like “regional development projects, such as the Turkmenistan-Afghanistan-Pakistan-India gas pipeline project, the Central Asia South Asia Electricity Transmission and Trade Project, the Chabahar port project agreed between Afghanistan, India and the Islamic Republic of lran”.

China has taken the inclusion of BRI in a UN resolution as a diplomatic victory of sorts.

Liu Jieyi, the Chinese permanent representative to the UN, told reporters here that the “Chinese concept was put into a Security Council resolution for the first time on Friday, thus showing the consensus of the international community on embracing the concept, and manifesting huge Chinese contributions to the global governance”.

“The Chinese envoy said that latest council move is conducive to creating a favourable atmosphere for China to host a Belt and Road forum for international cooperation in Beijing this May in order to brainstorm on interconnected development,” Xinhua reported.

Liu also said he hoped that all “UN member states will take an active part in the joint efforts to carry out the Chinese initiative and the Chinese concept by implementing the new council resolution. Resolutions adopted by the Security Council are legally binding”.

TIBETAN RESISTANCE MOVEMENT – A DAY TO REMEMBER – MARCH 10, 1959

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TIBETAN RESISTANCE MOVEMENT – A DAY TO REMEMBER – MARCH 10, 1959

TIBETAN RESISTANCE MOVEMENT – A DAY TO REMEMBER – MARCH 10, 1959.

Tibetans remember March 10, 1959 as Tibetan National Uprising Day. Tibetans are not asking for “SEPARATION” from Red China. Tibetans claim that Tibet is Never Part of China. The issue of concern is illegal Occupation of Tibet. The purpose of Tibetan Resistance Movement is that of resisting illegal Occupation and to Evict Occupier of Tibet.

Tibetan Resistance Movement. A Day to Remember, March 10, 1959.

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada

DOOM DOOMA DOOMSAYER

This Day In History: 03/10/1959 – Rebellion in Tibet

1959

Rebellion in Tibet

TIBETAN RESISTANCE MOVEMENT. A DAY TO REMEMBER, MARCH 10, 1959. TIBETAN NATIONAL UPRISING DAY.
  • Author
    History.com Staff

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    A+E Networks

 

On this day in 1959, Tibetans band together in revolt, surrounding the summer palace of the Dalai Lama in defiance of Chinese occupation forces.

China’s occupation of Tibet began nearly a decade before, in October 1950, when troops from its People’s Liberation Army (PLA) invaded the country, barely one year after the Communists gained full control of mainland China. The Tibetan government gave into Chinese pressure the following year, signing a treaty that ensured the power of His Holiness the Dalai Lama, the country’s spiritual leader, over Tibet’s domestic affairs. Resistance to the Chinese occupation built steadily over the next several years, including a revolt in several areas of eastern Tibet in 1956. By December 1958, rebellion was simmering in Lhasa, the capital, and the PLA command threatened to bomb the city if order was not maintained.

The March 1959 uprising in Lhasa was triggered by fears of a plot to kidnap the Dalai Lama and take him to Beijing. When Chinese military officers invited His Holiness to visit the PLA headquarters for a theatrical performance and official tea, he was told he must come alone, and that no Tibetan military bodyguards or personnel would be allowed past the edges of the military camp. On March 10, 300,000 loyal Tibetans surrounded Norbulingka Palace, preventing the Dalai Lama from accepting the PLA’s invitation. By March 17, Chinese artillery was aimed at the palace, and the Dalai Lama was evacuated to neighboring India. Fighting broke out in Lhasa two days later, with Tibetan rebels hopelessly outnumbered and outgunned. Early on March 21, the Chinese began shelling Norbulingka, slaughtering tens of thousands of men, women and children still camped outside. In the aftermath, the PLA cracked down on Tibetan resistance, executing the Dalai Lama’s guards and destroying Lhasa’s major monasteries along with thousands of their inhabitants.

China’s stranglehold on Tibet and its brutal suppression of separatist activity has continued in the decades following the unsuccessful uprising. Tens of thousands of Tibetans followed their leader to India, where the Dalai Lama has long maintained a government-in-exile in the foothills of the Himalayas.

 

REMEMBERING MARCH 10, 1959 – TRIBUTE TO PHOTOGRAPHER JIGME TARING

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Remembering historical events of March 10, 1959, I am very happy to share J. Norbu’s tribute to

Tibetan Official Photographer Jigme Taring.

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada

Doom Dooma Doomsayer

THE MYSTERY OF THE MARCH 10 PHOTOGRAPHER

By J. Norbu

 
Last year, when putting together the March 10th Memorial website, a major problem I encountered was obtaining photographs and film footage for this critical period in our modern history. Three black-&-white photographs

were all there was of the public demonstration on the morning of March 10th.

REMEMBERING MARCH 10, 1959. TRIBUTE TO TIBETAN OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHER JIGME TARING.

Possibly the most reproduced of these three photos is that of the enormous crowd gathered before the eastern gate of the Norbulingka palace. A snow lion statue is in the right foreground with the scene extending back to somewhere near the Chango bridge on the Norbulingka–Lhasa road.

REMEMBERING MARCH 10, 1959. TRIBUTE TO TIBETAN OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHER JIGME TARING.

The second photo gives us an even further view of the crowd and shows people from Lhasa streaming to joining the gathering. You also get a glimpse of the Chakpori in the distance. The third photo is disturbing. We have a partial view of the mutilated body of Phakpala Khenchung Sonam Gyaltsen behind one of the two snow lion statues in front of the main gate, surrounded by people brandishing daggers, swords and even a hatchet.

 

Remembering March 10, 1959. Tribute to Tibetan Official Photographer Jigme Taring.

A few of the people are looking up at the photographer who evidently took his picture from one of the two squarish turrets on either side of the main gate, most likely the one on the right as the head of the snow-lion is turned to the left. All three photographs have most likely been taken by the same photographer as the vantage point of all three images appear to be the same.

Remembering March 10, 1959. Tribute to Tibetan Official Photographer Jigme Taring.

My guess is that the photographer was probably Jigme Taring. The people knew him as the Dalai Lama’s official photographer and perhaps that’s why don’t appear particularly hostile to him. We know the public was otherwise very angry, even violent that day. Of course, we cannot be certain that Taring took these photographs, but so far, I have not come across any mention of another official in the Norbulingka that day who might have taken these photographs.

Remembering March 10, 1959. Tribute to Tibetan Official Photographer Jigme Taring.

It is further possible that Jigme Taring also took the two photographs we have of the women’s demonstrations before the Potala Palace at the Dribu Yukhai Thang (where government barley was threshed).

 

Remembering March 10, 1959. Tribute to Tibetan Official Photographer Jigme Taring.

Photo of Jigme Taring shooting a cine-camera, with his still-camera and flash by his side. Photo by Chen Zonglie, Xinhua News Agency.

Jigme Taring was in and out of Norbulingka in the subsequent days, but during the night of the artillery barrage and the next day of the PLA attack he was inside the Summer Palace. It is therefore more than possible that the color images below of armed Tibetan volunteer fighters inside and outside the Norbulingka walls were taken by Jigme Taring. These scenes were shot on color film, most probably on the “official” cine-camera that Jigme Taring had earlier used to film the Dalai Lama’s Geshe examinations.

Remembering March 10, 1959. Tribute to photographer Jigme Taring. H.H. The Dalai Lama at his Geshe examination.

The Dalai Lama debating at his Geshe examination. From the official film shot by Jigme Taring.

He had probably used what was left of his color film stock to record the scenes at the Norbulingka. We now know that in the chaos Taring left the cine-camera behind in Norbulingka with a young official, and it is almost certain that the Chinese later obtained the camera and film. Some of the footage taken by Taring later appeared (in black& white) in the Chinese propaganda film Putting Down the Rebellion in Tibet. The Chinese Propaganda Department was then using black and white film, and only a few years later used color film for their documentary, By The Lhasa River. The color footage of the Taring film have also appeared in other documentaries and are probably now available somewhere in Beijing.

The following images are screenshots taken off a video made from the color film. In the first image the person sitting in the foreground, right, looks very much like a young Juchen Thupten Namgyal of Derge, who in his 22 volume (!) autobiography mentions that he was a volunteer defender at the Norbulingka.

Remembering March 10, 1959. Tribute to photographer Jigme Taring.
Remembering March 10, 1959. Tribute to photographer Jigme Taring.
Remembering March 10, 1959. Tribute to photographer Jigme Taring.
Remembering March 10, 1959. Tribute to photographer Jigme Taring.

We cannot be sure but the next three images are possibly scenes inside and outside the Norbulingka. The neat walls in the second and third image could be the outer wall of the Norbulingka and the yellow wall in the fourth image could be that of the interior compound, which was traditionally painted yellow.

The Chinese also shot some black & white footage of Tibetan volunteers outside the Norbulingka though it was understandably taken from a distance. A Chinese journalist Shan Chao [1] accompanied some PLA officers in a convoy of three armored cars on Monday the 16th to survey the trenches and fortifications the “rebels” were building at the northern end of the Norbulingka. A cameraman from the propaganda department recorded the scene on film.

Remembering March 10, 1959. Tribute to Photographer Jigme Taring.
Remembering March 10, 1959. Tribute to Photographer Jigme Taring.

In conclusion, I would like to dedicate this post to the memory of Jigme Taring – photographer and man of courage. In March 1959, he went to the Norbulingka to serve and protect the Dalai Lama and remained there through the period of the Dalai Lama’s escape, and during the subsequent fighting. In his autobiography, the monk official (tsedrung) Tenpa Soepa [2] mentions meeting Jigme Taring during an intense artillery bombardment.

Taring Dzasak who asked me for help, and we went inside the Phodrang Sarpa (New Palace). All the window panes were broken and the floor was filled with shards of glass. Taring Dzasak took out a (cine?) camera and a few rolls of film from a room below the Phodrang and said, pointing his gun to his head said, ‘Let’s get going, If worse comes to worst, this is the way’. He clearly meant that if nothing worked, we would have to take our own lives. As we came out of the Phodrang, a shell landed near us and exploded; when the smoke cleared, Taring Dzasak was nowhere to be seen.”

Remembering March 10, 1959. Tribute to Photographer Jigme Taring.

According to Mrs. Taring [1] her husband told her (in exile) that he had taken the official cine-camera from the Dalai Lama’s palace and shot scenes of the fighting and artillery bombardments. He then gave the camera to a junior official to look after, but never met him again. He then took a rifle from an official who did not know how to handle it and joined in the fighting. Finally, he and a soldier, Pasang Thondup, attempted to escape. “To avoid being tortured by the Chinese they made a pact that if either of them was hit by a shell, then the injured one should be shot dead by the other.” But both of them managed to escape. “His only possessions when he fled was a camera, some film, a pair of binoculars and a revolver.”

On his way, south he was stopped by Chushigangdruk fighters but convinced them that he was Taring Dzasak and that the photographs in his camera were invaluable and should reach the Dalai Lama. They let him go. This camera was most likely his still camera with which he took the three black-&-white photographs (and the women’s rally photos) discussed at the beginning of this article – which have immeasurably benefited our history and struggle.

Notes:

[1] Tenpa Soepa, 20 Years of My Life in China’s Death Camp, Author House, Bloomington IN, 2008, p.30

[2] Shan Chao, “Sunshine After Rain: From a Lhasa Diary”, Peking Review May 5, 1959 No:18, Special Tibet Number.

 Dolma

[3] Rinchen Taring, Daughter of Tibet, John Murray, London, 1970. p.297-298

REMEMBERING MARCH 10, 1959.

 

REMEMBERING MARCH 10, 1959.
 

 

REMEMBERING MARCH 10, 1959 – TRIBUTE TO PHOTOGRAPHER JIGME TARING

Posted on Updated on

 

THE MYSTERY OF THE MARCH 10 PHOTOGRAPHER
By J. Norbu
Last year, when putting together the March 10th Memorial website, a major problem I encountered was obtaining photographs and film footage for this critical period in our modern history. Three black-&-white photographs were all there was of the public demonstration on the morning of March 10th.
Possibly the most reproduced of these three photos is that of the enormous crowd gathered before the eastern gate of the Norbulingka palace. A snow lion statue is in the right foreground with the scene extending back to somewhere near the Chango bridge on the Norbulingka–Lhasa road.

The second photo gives us an even further view of the crowd and shows people from Lhasa streaming to joining the gathering. You also get a glimpse of the Chakpori in the distance. The third photo is disturbing. We have a partial view of the mutilated body of Phakpala Khenchung Sonam Gyaltsen behind one of the two snow lion statues in front of the main gate, surrounded by people brandishing daggers, swords and even a hatchet

t.

A few of the people are looking up at the photographer who evidently took his picture from one of the two squarish turrets on either side of the main gate, most likely the one on the right as the head of the snow-lion is turned to the left. All three photographs have most likely been taken by the same photographer as the vantage point of all three images appear to be the same.

My guess is that the photographer was probably Jigme Taring. The people knew him as the Dalai Lama’s official photographer and perhaps that’s why don’t appear particularly hostile to him. We know the public was otherwise very angry, even violent that day. Of course, we cannot be certain that Taring took these photographs, but so far, I have not come across any mention of another official in the Norbulingka that day who might have taken these photographs.

It is further possible that Jigme Taring also took the two photographs we have of the women’s demonstrations before the Potala Palace at the Dribu Yukhai Thang (where government barley was threshed)

.

Photo of Jigme Taring shooting a cine-camera, with his still-camera and flash by his side. Photo by Chen Zonglie, Xinhua News Agency.

Jigme Taring was in and out of Norbulingka in the subsequent days, but during the night of the artillery barrage and the next day of the PLA attack he was inside the Summer Palace. It is therefore more than possible that the color images below of armed Tibetan volunteer fighters inside and outside the Norbulingka walls were taken by Jigme Taring. These scenes were shot on color film, most probably on the “official” cine-camera that Jigme Taring had earlier used to film the Dalai Lama’s Geshe examinations.

The Dalai Lama debating at his Geshe examination. From the official film shot by Jigme Taring.

He had probably used what was left of his color film stock to record the scenes at the Norbulingka. We now know that in the chaos Taring left the cine-camera behind in Norbulingka with a young official, and it is almost certain that the Chinese later obtained the camera and film. Some of the footage taken by Taring later appeared (in black& white) in the Chinese propaganda film Putting Down the Rebellion in Tibet. The Chinese Propaganda Department was then using black and white film, and only a few years later used color film for their documentary, By The Lhasa River. The color footage of the Taring film have also appeared in other documentaries and are probably now available somewhere in Beijing.

The following images are screenshots taken off a video made from the color film. In the first image the person sitting in the foreground, right, looks very much like a young Juchen Thupten Namgyal of Derge, who in his 22 volume (!) autobiography mentions that he was a volunteer defender at the Norbulingka.

We cannot be sure but the next three images are possibly scenes inside and outside the Norbulingka. The neat walls in the second and third image could be the outer wall of the Norbulingka and the yellow wall in the fourth image could be that of the interior compound, which was traditionally painted yellow.

The Chinese also shot some black & white footage of Tibetan volunteers outside the Norbulingka though it was understandably taken from a distance. A Chinese journalist Shan Chao [1] accompanied some PLA officers in a convoy of three armored cars on Monday the 16th to survey the trenches and fortifications the “rebels” were building at the northern end of the Norbulingka. A cameraman from the propaganda department recorded the scene on film.

In conclusion, I would like to dedicate this post to the memory of Jigme Taring – photographer and man of courage. In March 1959, he went to the Norbulingka to serve and protect the Dalai Lama and remained there through the period of the Dalai Lama’s escape, and during the subsequent fighting. In his autobiography, the monk official (tsedrung) Tenpa Soepa [2] mentions meeting Jigme Taring during an intense artillery bombardment.

Taring Dzasak who asked me for help, and we went inside the Phodrang Sarpa (New Palace). All the window panes were broken and the floor was filled with shards of glass. Taring Dzasak took out a (cine?) camera and a few rolls of film from a room below the Phodrang and said, pointing his gun to his head said, ‘Let’s get going, If worse comes to worst, this is the way’. He clearly meant that if nothing worked, we would have to take our own lives. As we came out of the Phodrang, a shell landed near us and exploded; when the smoke cleared, Taring Dzasak was nowhere to be seen.”

According to Mrs. Taring [1] her husband told her (in exile) that he had taken the official cine-camera from the Dalai Lama’s palace and shot scenes of the fighting and artillery bombardments. He then gave the camera to a junior official to look after, but never met him again. He then took a rifle from an official who did not know how to handle it and joined in the fighting. Finally, he and a soldier, Pasang Thondup, attempted to escape. “To avoid being tortured by the Chinese they made a pact that if either of them was hit by a shell, then the injured one should be shot dead by the other.” But both of them managed to escape. “His only possessions when he fled was a camera, some film, a pair of binoculars and a revolver.”

On his way, south he was stopped by Chushigangdruk fighters but convinced them that he was Taring Dzasak and that the photographs in his camera were invaluable and should reach the Dalai Lama. They let him go. This camera was most likely his still camera with which he took the three black-&-white photographs (and the women’s rally photos) discussed at the beginning of this article – which have immeasurably benefited our history and struggle.

Notes:

[1] Tenpa Soepa, 20 Years of My Life in China’s Death Camp, Author House, Bloomington IN, 2008, p.30

[2] Shan Chao, “Sunshine After Rain: From a Lhasa Diary”, Peking Review May 5, 1959 No:18, Special Tibet Number.

Dolma

[3] Rinchen Taring, Daughter of Tibet, John Murray, London, 1970. p.297-298

 

MARCH OF TIME – INDIA CELEBRATES 68th REPUBLIC DAY

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MARCH OF TIME – INDIA CELEBRATES 68th REPUBLIC DAY

Special Frontier Force does not participate in Republic Day Parade on Raj path, New Delhi. I am pleased to extend Republic Day Greetings to all of my readers.

Rudranarasimham, Rebbapragada

SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE

68th Republic Day: A celebration of firsts

January 26, 2017

 

1/768th Republic Day

As India showcased its defense capabilities and rich cultural heritage on the 68th Republic Day, here’s a look at some of the firsts in this year’s celebrations. (TOI photo)

2/7UAE Presidential Guard

The highlight of this year’s parade was a 149-member UAE Presidential Guard comprising servicemen in the Air Force, the Navy and Army. Led by a UAE band consisting of 35 musicians, the contingent marched on the Rajpath and presented a ceremonial salute to the President of India. (TOI photo)

3/7NSG contingent

For the first time, a contingent of the National Security Guard (NSG), popularly known as the Black Cat Commandos, participated in the Republic Day parade. (TOI photo)

4/7Tejas Aircraft

The parade witnessed the fly-past of three LCA Tejas Aircraft flying at a height of 300 meters from ground in ‘Vic’ formation. (Image courtesy: SpokespersonMoD/Twitter)


5/7Indigenous Defence technology

IAF aircraft equipped with the indigenous Airborne Early Warning & Control System (AEW&C) developed by DRDO also flew past. (TOI photo)

6/7GST Tableau

A tableau displaying objectives and benefits of Goods and Services Tax (GST) was also showcased during the parade. GST, which aims to subsume a multitude of taxes, is the single biggest tax reform initiative undertaken since Independence.

7/7Tricolour on Burj Khalifa, Dubai, United Arab Emirates.

Burj Khalifa, the world’s tallest building located in Dubai, will be lit up in the colors of the Indian National flag on Wednesday and Thursday to celebrate India’s 68th Republic Day. (Image courtesy: Burj Khalifa/Twitter)

 

Copyright © 2016 Bennett, Coleman & Co. Ltd. All rights reserved.

Inserted from <http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/68th-Republic-Day-A-celebration-of-firsts/UAE-Presidential-Guard/photostory/56790851.cms>

RESIST AUTHORITARIAN, AUTOCRATIC GOVERNANCE – TIBETAN RESISTANCE MOVEMENT

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RESIST AUTHORITARIAN, AUTOCRATIC GOVERNANCE – TIBETAN RESISTANCE MOVEMENT

I have lifetime affiliation to Tibetan Resistance Movement for I belong to a military organization called Special Frontier Force. I am also a Member of a Group called Greenpeace Ann Arbor Alumni for I worked for Greenpeace USA for ten years at its Ann Arbor location until it got closed due to budget constraints.

For the first time in the history of Greenpeace Organization, it is advocating Resistance to Authoritarian, or Autocratic Governance to achieve its Mission to defend Environment. Resistance is a tactic used by people to win Political Freedom or to overthrow dictatorial regimes unacceptable to people. Greenpeace Protest asking people to “RESIST” goes beyond its usual advocacy for Environment. It demands people to Resist the Ruler even though Greenpeace has no political agenda to promote any Political Party.

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada

SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE

 

GREENPEACE PROTEST NEAR THE WHITE HOUSE – THE WASHINGTON POST

 

 

Clipped from: https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/public-safety/handful-of-protesters-climb-270-foot-tall-crane-in-downtown-dc-disrupt-traffic/2017/01/25/a9346920-e2ff-11e6-ba11-63c4b4fb5a63_story.html?utm_term=.7c38edaadc6e&wpisrc=nl_todayworld&wpmm=1#comments

 

A banner saying “Resist” is visible over the roof of the White House on Wednesday. (Bill O’Leary/The Washington Post)

Activists affiliated with Greenpeace climbed atop a 270-foot construction crane in downtown Washington on Wednesday and unfurled a large orange and black banner with a message positioned for the newest occupant of the White House but meant for those opposed to its agenda: “Resist.”

D.C. police waited out the seven protesters, shutting down traffic at a major intersection through the morning commute and into the evening and suspending work on new offices for Fannie Mae at 15th and L streets NW.

The action is one of several protests in the District since just before the presidential inauguration, and more are planned in the coming weeks.

By Wednesday evening, the protesters, all expert climbers, according to Greenpeace, and dressed with helmets and safety harnesses, had rolled up the 35-foot-by-75-foot banner but had not begun to descend a steep stairway to the ground, where police were waiting to arrest them.

At about 10 p.m., the seven activists came off the crane — about 18 hours after they started their climb — and were taken into custody. They were charged with second-degree burglary, unlawful entry, and destruction of property.

Five protesters spent the day on the arm, or jib, of the crane, while two chained themselves to the tower, blocking potential arrest efforts by police and preventing the crane operator from reaching the controls. They started their ascent about 4 a.m. and by 9 a.m. had unfurled the banner, using safety ropes to descend from the arm.

Greenpeace, an international environmental group, said the organization was protesting the Trump administration and the president’s decision to push forward with the Keystone XL and Dakota Access oil pipelines.

On Wednesday, dozens of onlookers gathered, clutching coffee cups and peering upward at the site, the location of the former Washington Post headquarters. Greenpeace said it chose the location because the hanging banner could be seen a half-mile away at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave.

Firefighters from Rescue 1, the department’s elite rescue team, were on standby if needed, but police preferred to let the protest proceed. Police Capt. Robert Glover of the special operations team said investigators had the ability to talk with at least one of the demonstrators and were in contact with Greenpeace.

 

“Safety is our primary concern,” Glover said early into the demonstration. “Time is on our side.”

D.C. police did not discuss possible charges, saying that would be left up to the U.S. attorney’s office.

One of the protesters, Pearl Robinson, 26, of Oakland, Calif., identified herself as an expert climber and said in a phone interview from atop the crane, “We’re here to resist the normalization of this [Trump] administration.”

Robinson, a national organizer for the Rainforest Action Network, noted that live-streams of the protest were trending on social media, which she called a success. She said some of President Trump’s recent executive orders were “a slap in the face” to U.S. residents.

Cassady Sharp, a spokeswoman for Greenpeace, a group known for activism that sometimes involves confronting authorities and corporations, said the organization wanted “to send a message to the people who are feeling discouraged after just a few days of Trump’s administration.” She said protesters were from around the country, including New York, San Francisco and the Washington area.

Lee DeLong, a senior vice president for Bethesda-based Clark Construction, the lead contractor for the Fannie Mae building project, said workers discovered the protesters about 6 a.m. and called police. He said the group broke into the secured site by breaking a lock, adding that getting into the crane and up onto the arm requires knowledge of how a crane works.

“These aren’t amateurs,” DeLong said.

He said he supports the decision by police to not send officers and firefighters up the crane to pull the protesters off, calling that a dangerous maneuver.

“Our primary concern is safety,” DeLong said. “I think the police and EMS response has been appropriate.”

DeLong said some workers could reach part of the construction site’s perimeter, but most work was halted for the day. He said the crane will need to be inspected before it can be put back into use. He would not say how much money the company is losing but said, “It is a significant impact.”

Protesters with Greenpeace climb a crane in downtown D.C. (Oliver Contreras/For The Washington Post)

Erica White, 39, who lives around the block from the site, said she was out walking when she saw the banner. “It’s got to be crippling for people to not be able to come down L Street. It definitely sends a message, for sure.” She backed the message: “People are going to hold his feet to the fire. They’re not going to back down.”

Dawn Reed, 35, who works in information technology in Arlington, said: “I wish Trump would take notice of it. But I don’t think he’s going to care.” She also said she supported Greenpeace. “I just had a baby, and I want her to grow up in a world that’s not polluted.”

One of the Greenpeace activists who climbed a crane at a construction site in downtown Washington to protest President Trump’s environmental policies live streamed from atop the crane. A Greenpeace activist who climbed a crane at a construction site in downtown Washington to protest President Trump’s environmental policies live streamed it. (Facebook/Greenpeace)

Steve VanAusdall, 50, who works at a nearby construction site, was trying to exit a parking garage to go home but was blocked in by police vehicles. He said the garage was also hurt financially because it could not let in additional vehicles.

“I’m all for freedom of speech and protesting peacefully and lawfully, but these guys could be here for two days,” VanAusdall said Wednesday morning. “It’s going to be a long waiting game, I’m afraid.”

VanAusdall said that he was trying to get to another job in North Carolina on Thursday and that the delay was costing him. “This is hurting people financially,” he said.

Wednesday’s protest comes after Trump’s inauguration last week, when demonstrators were present in large numbers throughout the city, particularly near Franklin Square, where windows of businesses were smashed and a limousine was set on fire.

More than 230 people were arrested Friday. Many were charged with felony rioting.

Dana Hedgpeth contributed to this report.

Protesters with Greenpeace climb a crane in downtown D.C. (Oliver Contreras/For The Washington Post)

SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE WELCOMES THE WHITE HOUSE MEETING BETWEEN PRESIDENT TRUMP AND DALAI LAMA

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SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE WELCOMES THE WHITE HOUSE MEETING BETWEEN PRESIDENT TRUMP AND DALAI LAMA

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On behalf of Special Frontier Force, I welcome The White House meeting between President Trump and Dalai Lama to reaffirm our belief in forging friendly relations between Tibet, India, and the United States.

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada
Ann Arbor, MI 48104-4162 USA
SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE

Hopeful of an early meeting between Trump, Dalai Lama: Lobsang Sangay | Central Tibetan Administration

Monday, December 19, 2016
11:26 PM

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Hopeful of an early meeting between Trump, Dalai Lama: Lobsang Sangay

December 19, 2016

Lobsang Sangay (left), the Prime Minister of Tibet’s government in exile with Tibet’s spiritual leader, The Dalai Lama. Photo: PTI
By Elizabeth Roche – Live Mint, 19 December 2016
Tibet’s PM-in-exile Lobsang Sangay says encouraged by Donald Trump’s stance on One China policy, remains hopeful of support to resolve Tibet issue peacefully
New Delhi: Lobsang Sangay, ‘prime minister’ of the Tibetan government in exile in India, says he is encouraged by US president elect Donald Trump’s recent statement that his administration does not need to be bound by the One China policy.
Sangay is also hopeful of an early meeting between Trump and the Tibetan spiritual leader, the Dalai Lama. Sangay was of the view India should also make Tibet as issue for talks with China given that China already considers it a “core” issue with India. On the reincarnation of the Dalai Lama, Sangay said the institution of the Dalai Lama would not end but continue after the eventual passing of the 14th Dalai Lama. Edited excerpts from an interview.
The “Middle path” (autonomy for Tibet rather than independence) that the Dalai Lama and you have been advocating seems to be yielding no returns. Is there a chance of a rethink on this?
No. I think, if China grows strong and it’s growing stronger, China needs to think. If they really want to be respected in the international community, you have to earn that respect. And with all the money and military power you cannot buy or force respect, you have to earn it by demonstrating an action and solving the issue of Tibet will earn that respect for them. There is an argument on the Chinese side that if you are weak and you give concession, others will take advantage. Now they are strong. If they give concessions, they will be giving concession from the space of strength.
US president-elect Donald Trump recently said the new administration does not need to be bound by the One China policy. The context was with reference to Taiwan. But does this give you hope as well?
That was a very bold commentary coming from president-elect Donald Trump. We do think that boldness with substance is the right approach with the Chinese government. It looks now that his team has done research on Taiwan, that what he said was deliberate, after substantive research. Similarly, we would appreciate if he would also do something similar for Tibetan people. US presidents George W Bush and Barrack Obama have met his Holiness the Dalai Lama four times each. We remain hopeful that Donald Trump will support the Middle Way approach and meet His Holiness and strongly encourage that the envoys of His Holiness meet with Chinese envoys to resolve this issue of Tibet peacefully.
There have been no talks between the Tibetan envoys and China for six years now. What is it that you think will give an impetus to restart dialogue?
The Trump administration, the European Union, India, Japan, Australia—all governments must have a coordinated effort to press the Chinese government to solve the issue of Tibet peacefully. It should be a coordinated effort and consistent effort.
You were invited to Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s swearing in ceremony (in May 2014). That was seen as a message to China. But then, the Modi government seemed to be making efforts to build a relationship with China. Now, irritants in the relationship have surfaced—China’s objections to India’s Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG) membership being one. We now see clearance for His Holiness to visit Arunachal Pradesh in 2017. Do you see a consistent policy towards Tibet from the Indian government?
Recently, President of India, Pranab Mukherjee hosted the Dalai Lama. This is a bold gesture from the government of India which we really appreciate. The Indian government is formulating its policy towards China which is showing all the right trends. India has done the most for Tibet. The largest number of Tibetans are in India. The Tibetan government in exile is based in India. I can’t think of any other place where this could be based. But we always request and appeal that Tibet be treated as one of the core issues (of India with China). China already does that. India has the moral high ground to speak for Tibet.
His Holiness has said the institution of the Dalai Lama might end with him because of fears that the Chinese government will foist its own Dalai Lama onto the Tibetan people. At the same time, he has also said that the next Dalai Lama could be born outside Tibet—among the populations in exile. How do you see the future?
The institution of the Dalai Lama will not end. He is the 14th Dalai Lama. For 14 times the Tibetan people have asked him to come back and we will ask him again for the 15th time. When Tibetans asked him to come for 14 times, we had an independent country. Now when we are in exile and we are leading this freedom struggle, all the more reason that we have to ask him to come back. So he will come back.

2016 Central Tibetan Administration

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