My CIA Connection

PRACTICAL vs NATURAL SOLUTION FOR FREEDOM IN TIBET

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PRACTICAL vs NATURAL SOLUTION FOR FREEDOM IN TIBET

 
 

In my analysis, Freedom in Tibet is Natural Condition or Phenomenon resulting from Natural Forces acting upon Tibetan Plateau in unceasing manner. Tibetans got accustomed to Independent lifestyles as Freedom in Tibet is entirely natural. People’s Republic of China’s use of military force and power to abrogate Freedom in Tibet apart from being unfair and unjust remains unnatural. Peace, Harmony, and Tranquility in human living experience demand natural operations.

 
 

Living Tibetan Spirits bet on ‘Karmic Design’ as consequences of evil actions result in Calamity, Disaster, Catastrophe, Cataclysm, and Apocalypse. China cannot ward off disaster by paying ransom. Natural Calamity will force China to restore Natural Freedom in Occupied Tibet. All existence is bound by time and change, yet ultimately rests in the Divine. Freedom in Tibet is Just a Stone’s Throw Away. I say, “BEIJING DOOMED.”

 
 

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada

SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE

 
 

 
 

AS DALAI LAMA LOOKS FOR PRACTICAL SOLUTION OVER ‘FREE TIBET’, TIBETANS BET ON ‘KARMIC DESIGN’

 
 

Clipped from: http://www.dnaindia.com/india/report-as-dalai-lama-looks-for-practical-solution-tibetans-bet-on-karmic-design-for-free-tibet-2601382

For decades, Tibetans living in exile across the globe fought what they thought was a “freedom struggle”. Sixty years down the line, it is a “karmic design” which they seem to be banking upon to get back to their homeland.

With China asserting itself like never before, and His Holiness the Dalai Lama talking about Tibetans “not seeking separation” from China but only “certain rights” to enable Tibetans preserve their culture, language and rich Buddhist tradition, Tibetans who have grown-up on the idea of a Free Tibet now find themselves in a quandary.

The Tibetans’ belief that since two of the three dreams dreamt by His Holiness the Dalai Lama came true the third one will come true too, is what appears to be lending more hope to the exiled community than the idea of a “freedom struggle”.

In the first dream, the Dalai Lama saw bloodshed. The Tibetans believe that this dream became a reality after 81,000 Tibetans were killed between March and September 1959 and a million Tibetans died during the Chinese invasion and occupation.

In the second dream, His Holiness saw that he was meeting with people wearing white clothing. After arriving in India, the Dalai Lama met with the likes of India’s first Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru and first President Rajendra Prasad—both used to wear white kurtas. So, the Tibetans believe that the second dream came true as well.

But it is the third dream which gives Tibetans maximum hope. In that, the Dalai Lama dreamt of himself being in a room “filled with light” in the Potala Palace in Lhasa where he is getting reunited with Tibetans inside Tibet.

“Because the first two dreams came true, by karmic design, the third dream will also come true,” Dr Lobsang Sangay, President of the Central Tibetan Administration, told a massive gathering of Tibetans in the picturesque hill township of McLeod Ganj last week.

“Let us reunite Dalai Lama with Tibetans inside Tibet,” Dr Lobsang Sangay, Dalai Lama’s political successor, said asking the Tibetans to re-dedicate themselves and strengthen their efforts to make the dream and Dalai Lama’s return to Potala Palace a reality.

The fact that the Tibetan cause has got watered down from a freedom struggle to autonomy over the years is something that has not gone unnoticed.

Tibetans living in exile across the globe are observing the year 2018 as “Thank You India” year. This, they say, is an expression of their gratitude towards a country which not only gave them shelter but also helped keep their “freedom struggle” and “movement” alive for six decades.

McLeod Ganj—the seat of the Tibetan Government-In-Exile–in Dharamshala in Himachal Pradesh is not called “Little Lhasa” for nothing. This place has not been just a home away from home for the exiled Tibetans. It has also been a launchpad sheltering a struggle which hopes to return the exiled Tibetans to their homeland someday.

So when the 14th Dalai Lama says that at a “practical level”, the Tibetans are “not seeking separation” from China and that their “elected political leadership” is committed to this stance, don’t the Tibetans have reason to feel let down? Even if they do, the Tibetans do well to hide it. Given the stature His Holiness enjoys, it is difficult to find a Tibetan voice dissenting with the Dalai Lama.

The Dalai Lama says that while remaining within the People’s Republic of China, Tibetans should have certain rights enshrined in the Chinese Constitution so that Tibetans can preserve their culture, language and rich Buddhist tradition. It’s anybody’s guess how generations of Tibetans who were brought up on dreams of a Free Tibet would feel about this.

In “practical” terms, the spiritual leader probably realizes that this is the best bargain he could secure from the increasingly assertive Chinese.

But the tone and tenor adopted by the political leadership of the Tibetan movement however would still make one believe that the idea of complete freedom has not been given up completely. Not yet.

At the main event to commence the year-long “Thank You India” celebrations, Dr Lobsang Sangay minced no words in detailing “60 years of China’s illegal invasion and occupation of Tibet”, “60 years of destruction of Tibetan civilization, culture and identity”, “60 years of killing, arbitrary arrests and tortures”, “60 years of China’s mass exploitation of our precious natural resources…our forests, our water and our glaciers”, and “60 years of tragedy, 60 years of suffering, 60 years of sadness and 60 years of pain”.

Sangay also lent a completely new dimension to Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s “Make In India” program by saying that the “original Make In India is the Tibetan movement”.

“Tibetans were born and brought up in India. They were educated in India. Our democracy replicates Indian democracy. Our philosophy of ahimsa comes from Indian philosophy. And the Tibetan cause is being rebuilt in India for the last 60 years,” Sangay said. “The original Made in India will also succeed. Your success will be our success, our success will be your success,” the Tibetan leader said addressing India’s Culture Minister Mahesh Sharma and senior BJP leader Ram Madhav.

No separation from China?  And Dalai Lama’s return to Potala Palace even as it continues to be under Chinese occupation? Will the 1.28 lakh Tibetans-in-exile ever amenably settle for that is the question that needs immediate answering.

 
 

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SIXTY-EIGHT YEARS OF CHINESE AGGRESSION IN TIBET

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SIXTY-EIGHT YEARS OF CHINESE AGGRESSION IN TIBET

 
 

For the last sixty-eight years, India is facing security threats all along the Himalayan Frontier following Communist China’s invasion of Tibet. India has no border with China. The border disputes between India and China simply describe the fact of Chinese Aggression in Tibet.

 
 

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada

SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE

 
 

ARMY INCREASES STRENGTH AT INDIA-CHINA-MYANMAR TRIJUNCTION NEAR TIBET TO PREVENT REPEAT OF A DOKLAM-LIKE STANDOFF

 
 

Clipped from: https://www.outlookindia.com/website/story/to-prevent-repeat-of-a-doklam-like-standoff-army-increases-strength-at-india-chi/310352

Indian troops deployed along the disputed Sino-India border in the Himalayan range of the Arunachal sector have increased their patrolling at a tri-junction of India, China and Myanmar to prevent a repeat of a Doklam-like standoff.

Top Army officials told PTI that the tri-junction, located around 50km from Walong, the easternmost town of India near the Tibet region, is extremely important for India to help it maintain its dominance in the nearby mountain passes and other areas.

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“After the Doklam standoff, we have increased our presence on India’s side of the tri-junction as it is very important for us from the strategic dimension,” a senior Army official said.

He said Chinese troops did not enter the Tri-junction too frequently but had developed a road infrastructure near the area which could be advantageous for the mobilization of army personnel.

Walong, situated on the bank of Lohit river, had witnessed the bravery of Indian troops against Chinese aggression during the 1962 war between the two countries.

The deepening of military engagement between China and Myanmar was another reason for India ramping up its presence at the tri-junction with thick rainforests on the Himalayan ranges.

The official said Myanmar’s border guarding forces did not patrol the tri-junction.

“After the tri-junction in Doklam in the Sikkim sector, this is the most important tri-junction along the Sino-India border,” he said.

Troops of India and China were locked in a 73-day-long standoff in Doklam from June 16 last year after the Indian side stopped the building of a road in the disputed area by the Chinese Army. The face-off ended on August 28.

The area in Doklam where China tried to construct a road is a disputed territory claimed by both China and Bhutan. India sent its troops to stop the Chinese construction activity, saying it could be a threat to its strategic interests in the region.

Since the Doklam standoff, India has deployed more troops and increased patrolling along the borders with China in the Tibetan region.

Another official said Indian troops have also enhanced their presence in all the areas in the Lohit Valley near the tri-junction.

“There are 18 mountain passes in the region and we have been carrying out long-range patrols to all these passes regularly,” he said.

He further said,” We have been carrying out war rehearsals regularly. You have to be in an offensive mode to remain in an advantageous position.”

China has been laying new roads and improving its overall infrastructure along the nearly 4,000km-long border with India.

Defence Minister Nirmala Sitharaman said last month that China had undertaken the construction of helipads, sentry posts and trenches for its army personnel near Doklam.

 
 

Sources said China has been keeping its troops in north Doklam and significantly ramping up its infrastructure in the disputed area.

In January, Army Chief Gen. Bipin Rawat had said the time had come for India to shift its focus from its borders with Pakistan to the frontier with China, indicating the seriousness of the situation.

 
 

THE TIBETAN STRUGGLE IS MADE IN INDIA

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THE TIBETAN STRUGGLE IS MADE IN INDIA

 
 

 
 

Tibet declared full independence on February 13, 1913. But, Tibetans chose to keep their external relations only with immediate neighbors such as China, Mongolia, India, and Nepal. United States desired formal diplomatic relations with Tibet while Tibet was unwilling to enter the global stage. For that reason, India took responsibility to represent Tibetan interests in diplomatic talks and negotiations. Communist China’s belligerence compelled Tibet and India to formulate Tibetan Resistance Movement since 1949.

 
 

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada

SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE

 
 

 
 

 
 

‘TIBET WILL SET THE LITMUS TEST FOR CHINA’S RISE’

 
 

Clipped from: http://www.dw.com/en/tibet-will-set-the-litmus-test-for-chinas-rise/a-43193973

Tibetans are preparing to mark the 60th anniversary of the Dalai Lama’s exile in India. Indian officials stoked controversy by spurning celebrations to avoid angering China. Sonia Phalnikar reports from Dharamshala.

The Dalai Lama, the revered spiritual leader of Tibetans and an international icon, fled Tibet in 1959 following a failed anti-China uprising. He arrived in India and set up a government in exile in the northern Indian town of Dharamshala.

India has continued to host the Dalai Lama and his fellow Tibetan Buddhist exiles even though China condemns them as dangerous separatists. India’s public embrace of the Dalai Lama has periodically aggravated border tensions and inflamed diplomatic spats between Delhi and Beijing.

Earlier this month, India’s 100,000-strong Tibetan community had planned a celebratory “Thank you, India” event in Delhi as a gesture of gratitude from the Dalai Lama and his followers for India’s role in sheltering them 60 years ago.

But a directive from India’s foreign secretary urged officials to stay away from the events, saying they coincided with a “sensitive time” for Delhi’s relations with Beijing. Invitations to top officials were withdrawn and the event was moved from Delhi to Dharamshala.

DW spoke with 36-year-old Dhardon Sharling, Information Secretary at the Tibetan Government-in-Exile in Dharamshala, about the deep bonds between India and Tibet, the rise of China and what it means for the Tibet cause, and life after the Dalai Lama.

Dhardon Sharling: ‘The Tibetan struggle is made in India’

DW: Are you upset that India has disregarded the Tibetan community’s interests to avoid angering China?

Dhardon Sharling: Not at all. China is always offended at anything the Dalai Lama does or says. That is the norm. But it was our own decision to shift the “Thank you, India” event to Dharamshala and not do it in Delhi, and respect what India deems fit for their diplomacy or diplomatic dealings with China.

We’ve been here for the past 60 years, so a small political decision, which I call a temporary phase in political diplomacy, will not undo six decades of deeply rooted bonds and ties. If the Tibet cause is at all alive, if the Dalai Lama is a flourishing icon, it’s thanks to India. We have even gone on record to say the Tibetan freedom struggle is made in India. It’s built on the foundations that India provided us with – education, health, housing etc.

This relationship dates back thousands of years, right from the start of Buddhism. Our language and our script come from India.

India is the only country [Tibetans live in 27 different countries] that allows you to write “Tibetan” as your nationality. Some countries require you to write China.

There’s no denying that India is keen to build good ties with China, which is growing increasingly assertive in the region. The presence of the Dalai Lama in India remains a sticking point between the two Asian giants. Aren’t you threatened by that?

Not really. What seems assertive to you is actually [China’s] insecurity. I’ll give you an example. Two months ago, German car manufacturer Mercedes-Benz posted an Instagram feed as part of their Monday motivation campaign. It was a picture of a car and a quote by the Dalai Lama saying, “Have an open mind and heart and things will be easy.” China lodged a complaint and Mercedes-Benz had to remove that post. Does that look like dominance or insecurity? If someone is really powerful, they won’t be affected by the simple things the Dalai Lama does.

But I agree that China’s dominance is growing in the Asian region and across the globe. We do understand that China will extend its tentacles and try to strangle India. That’s when we’d like India to be more assertive, to stand its ground, look into the eyes of their counterparts and not bow or kowtow, because that’s not in the Indian spirit.

Better ties between India and China don’t necessarily have to lead to India putting pressure on us. That’s because we ourselves are looking for reconciliation, for better relations with China, for engagement with China. I don’t think we’d apply a double standard and say India cannot do that. But that does not mean to abandon or disregard the Tibetan interest as well.

There have been no formal talks between China and the Dalai Lama’s representatives since 2010. Are you still open to dialogue with Beijing?

We are looking for friendship with China. We are looking at something called the Chinese outreach program, which is massive. We have Chinese outreach officers in four countries and we have a China desk in our office. Our official policy of resolving the issue of Tibet is the “Middle Way approach.” It calls for dialogue and engagement with China.

With Chinese President Xi Jinping’s term being extended indefinitely, we will continue to see Tibet being his biggest challenge. Tibet will really set the litmus test for China’s rise. China wants to rise and become powerful, but it will be Tibet that will mirror the reality in China.

What we are saying is that the Dalai Lama is the solution to all the problems that China is confronted with. So, Tibet is an opportunity for the Chinese leadership. If Beijing could see wisdom in that, India could be the best possible channel and partner in achieving this harmony between Tibet, India and China.

You say the Dalai Lama is the solution to everything. But the question remains: what happens when the Dalai Lama is gone? He seems to be what has held everything together so far.

There is a growing network of supporters rallying behind us. History tells us that the arc of justice definitely will bend toward a struggle that has survived on principles of nonviolence for 60 years.

Someone once said, “If Tibet fails, the world fails.” I really don’t think the world will fail us in our struggle.

Dhardon Sharling is the Information Secretary at the Tibetan Government-in-Exile in Dharamshala, India.

The Interview was conducted by Sonia Phalnikar.

A young Dalai Lama (right) is seen with Mao Zedong, chairman of the People’s Republic of China, in 1956

MARCH 31, 2018 – 60th MILESTONE OF MY LIFE’S STRUGGLE: LIVING TIBETAN SPIRITS

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MARCH 31, 2018 – 60th MILESTONE OF MY LIFE’S STRUGGLE: LIVING TIBETAN SPIRITS

 
 

 
 

From March 31, 1959 to March 31, 2018, Living Tibetan Spirits record Sixty Years of Life’s Journey in Exile. The Struggle is not over and yet it is time to take a deep breath and say Thank You India and Thank You America.

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

In Indian Tradition, the number 60 is very significant for Indians recognize Sixty specific names to mark Years for purposes of timekeeping. The Cyclical Flow of Time continues in sets of Sixty Years.

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada

SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE

 
 

 
 

DALAI LAMA: ‘DON’T KNOW HOW LONG STRUGGLE FOR TIBET WILL LAST’

 
 

Clipped from: https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/chandigarh/dont-know-how-long-struggle-for-tibet-will-last/articleshow/63563896.cms

A cultural program being organized as part of the Thank You India function held in McLeod Ganj on Saturday

I do not know for how long the Tibetan struggle will go on. However, the struggle will remain alive till the spirit of Tibetans remains,” the spiritual leader of Tibetans The Dalai Lama said at the “Thank You India” programme being held at McLeod Ganj on Saturday to mark his arrival in India, exactly 60 years ago.
 

On March 31, 1969, the Dalai Lama was forced to flee Tibet following failed uprising against China. After he took shelter in India, Tibetan community across globe under his leadership launched struggle for free Tibet but till date have not succeeded. During last few years, the demand has changed into one for autonomous Tibet.

While interacted with media persons, the Dalai Lama, when questioned about the possibility of Tibetans returning to their homeland one day, replied that Tibetan issue is an issue of justice. While commenting on the equation between India and China, he said that both were most populated countries of the World and both have ability to destroy each other.

“Any sensible person would want ‘Hindi-Chini Bhai Bhai’ to live together. None of them can be disloyal to each other, so other things will go on by the side,” he said. “Confrontation does not yield any result and amicable solution of Tibet problem is the only way out,” the Nobel Peace Laureate said.

“The Chinese are following a socialist form of government, which means everybody should have equal rights. We are not demanding separation from China, but the Tibetan people should have the autonomy to preserve their culture, language, environment and religion,” he added.



Earlier, the Dalai Lama recalled his journey in exile. He said that no time was wasted in these years. “It is a matter of pride that Tibetans have preserved their tradition and culture, wherever they are living across the globe,” he said.

He said that as there was need to preserve Tibetan culture and language, a logical analysis was also the need of hour. “When everybody is praising Tibetans it becomes our responsibility too to check where we were lacking,” he said.
 

 
 

PEACH BLOSSOMS – PRAYER FOR FREEDOM TO BLOSSOM IN TIBET

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PEACH BLOSSOMS – PRAYER FOR FREEDOM TO BLOSSOM IN TIBET

 
 

Tibetans need courage and freedom to be the people they were made to be. They need humility to lay aside progress or development granted by occupation. I ask the Lord of Compassion to give wings to Tibetans and they shall fly to experience the Joy of Freedom.

 
 

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada

SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE

 
 

Clipped from: http://usa.chinadaily.com.cn/a/201803/28/WS5abb4f62a3105cdcf6514dd7_1.html

Photo taken on March 27, 2018 shows peach blossoms at the Gala peach blossom scenic area in the Baiyi district of Nyingchi, Tibet. [Photo/Xinhua]

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

LIVING TIBETAN SPIRITS – LIFE IN EXILE – THANK YOU AMERICA

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LIVING TIBETAN SPIRITS – LIFE IN EXILE – THANK YOU AMERICA

 
 

 
 

Living Tibetan Spirits thank America for life in exile. My life’s final destination is not known. For now, I admit that I am not a Refugee and I am not an Asylee. While I live without knowing or reaching my destination, I say, “Thank You America.”

 
 

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada

SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE

 
 

DALAI LAMA TO KICK OFF YEAR-LONG ‘THANK YOU INDIA’ EVENTS ON SATURDAY

 
 

Clipped from: https://in.news.yahoo.com/dalai-lama-kick-off-long-061955936.html

The Central Tibetan Administration will organize a public event at the Tsuglagkhang temple on Saturday and the event will be attended by Indian dignitaries too.

New Delhi: Marking the 60th year of exile in India, Tibetan Buddhist leader Dalai Lama is set to kick off yearlong pan India ‘Thank You India’ events on March 31.

The Central Tibetan Administration will organize a public event at the Tsuglagkhang temple on Saturday and the event will be attended by Indian dignitaries too.

In a statement, President Dr Lobsang Sangay said that Tibet is inextricably linked to India through geography, history, culture, and spiritually and that “the Tibetan struggle is ‘Made in India’ and said that ‘the success of the Tibetan struggle will be India’s success story.”

The announcement of the spiritual leader’s attendance comes a month after, according to a report in the Indian Express earlier this month, foreign Secretary Vijay Gokhale had sent a note on February 22 to Cabinet Secretary PK Sinha, following which the “senior leaders” and “government functionaries” of the Centre and states were directed to skip events of exiled Tibetan leaders.

The Centre later clarified that Tibetan spiritual leader the Dalai Lama was free to “carry out his religious activities in India”, reacting to reports that the government has asked senior functionaries to “skip” all events by the “Tibetan leadership in India”.

In an interview to CNN-News18 earlier this month, Dalai Lama had said that he doesn’t care about alleged pressure from China forcing the cancellation of events in Delhi to mark 60 years of the Tibetan government’s exile in India. He also said the position of the Dalai Lama has become irrelevant now and that the Tibetan people must decide on whether to continue it. The Tibetan government-in-exile shifted the high-profile event commemorating Dalai Lama’s 60 years of exile as an effort to bringing peace to relations between India and China.

Many Tibetan activists are said to have communicated to relevant authorities as the development ‘humiliated’ Dalai Lama.

China has for long considered the spiritual leader as a dangerous separatist and says Tibet is an integral part of its territory and has been for centuries. Beijing also says its rule ended serfdom and brought prosperity to what was a backward region, and that it fully respects the rights of the Tibetan people.

“Today, His Holiness the Dalai Lama is the best ambassador for Indian values of non-violence, ahimsa and inter-religious harmony and the promotion of basic human values: compassion and kindness,” said Dr Sangay.

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

LIVING TIBETAN SPIRITS THANK US CONGRESS FOR GIVING SUPPORT

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LIVING TIBETAN SPIRITS THANK US CONGRESS FOR GIVING SUPPORT

 
 

 
 

Living Tibetan Spirits thank US Congress for giving $17 million in aid to Tibetan Government-in-Exile and worldwide Tibetan community.

 
 

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada

SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE

 
 

US CONGRESS AFFIRMS SUPPORT FOR TIBET WITH $17 MILLION IN AID TO EXILED GOVERNMENT AND TIBETANS WORLDWIDE – THE EPOCH TIMES

 
 

Clipped from: https://www.theepochtimes.com/us-congress-affirms-support-for-tibet-with-17-million-in-aid-to-exiled-government-and-tibetans-worldwide_2475193.html

 
 

 
 

Tibetan spiritual leader the Dalai Lama (C), flanked by President of the Central Tibetan Administration Lobsang Sangay (R) and Speaker of the Tibetan Parliament-in-exile Penpa Tsering (L), greets the audience during the 52nd anniversary of Tibetan Democracy Day at the Tsuglakhang Temple in McLeod Ganj, Dharamsala on Sept. 2, 2012. (STRDEL/AFP/Getty Images)

Amidst an escalating diplomatic and economic standoff between the United States and the Chinese communist regime, the U.S. Congress has approved a massive spending bill that includes $17 million that will be used to support Tibetans in and out of Tibet. This includes the Tibetan government-in-exile, which is vehemently opposed by the Chinese regime that currently rules over Tibet.

The funds were earmarked through the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2018 and include $8 million for Tibetans inside Tibet and $6 Million for Tibetan community in India and Nepal. On top of that, Congress created an additional new line of funding of $3 million to strengthen the capacity of the Tibetan government in exile and Tibetan institutions.

“We remain thankful to the U.S. government and Congress for their generous financial assistance towards the Tibetan community,” said Dr. Lobsang Sangay, president of the Tibetan government-in-exile, officially known as the Central Tibetan Administration (CTA).

The CTA is headquartered in Dharamshala, India, and effectively represents the Tibetan exile community in India, which numbers around 100,000. It also claims to represent the people of the entire Tibet region, which has been occupied by the Chinese regime ever since its military invasion of Tibet in 1950.

The increase of funds granted by Congress alleviates concerns that U.S. support for Tibet might be dwindling, as the Trump administration’s slashing of State Department budgets in 2017 had at the time raised fears that funding for Tibetans might be cut or terminated completely.

The funding is consistent with the decades-old U.S. policy of providing support for the Tibetans and the Tibetan exile government, despite the Chinese regime’s consistent opposition to such aid, which it sees as meddling in China’s domestic affairs.