THE EVIL RED EMPIRE – RED CHINA – IMPERIALIST

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THE EVIL RED EMPIRE – RED CHINA – IMPERIALIST:

Mao Zedong proclaims the founding of the People's Republic of China in Beijing on Oct. 1, 1949.
Mao Zedong proclaims the founding of the People’s Republic of China in Beijing on Oct. 1, 1949.

The term ‘IMPERIALISM’ refers to  extension of rule or influence by one government or nation over another. From the dawn of the written history, local rulers extended their realms by conquering other states. Industrial Revolution introduced a form of Imperialism in which Imperial State pursued the policy and practice of forming and maintaining an Empire in seeking to control raw materials and world markets by the conquest of other countries. The British Empire represented Imperialist Power called Great Britain. Marxists argued that Imperialism was the ultimate state of Capitalism. It gave an impression that Communism is fundamentally opposed to the practice of forming and maintain an Empire to control raw materials and global markets. The Evil Red Empire proclaimed by Mao Zedong or Mao Tse-Tung slowly transformed itself into an Imperial State. Now, Red China exploits raw materials and vast quantities of natural resources from nations across the globe and it supplies manufactured products to the rest of the world including all nations in the West which take pride in their belief called Capitalism.

the evil red empire secretary of state john kerry
the evil red empire secretary of state john kerry

US Secretary of State John Kerry visited Beijing on Saturday, May 16, 2015 with the hope of resolving the problems posed by Red China’s Empire building. He is soundly rebuffed while Red China’s President Xi Jinping announced that the US-China relations are stable. The economic and political influence of Red China give it the status of Imperialist State. Red China acts and behaves in a most assertive manner that signifies her full confidence of her military power to defend its Empire built since 1949 without fighting bloody battles that were common in the past.

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada
Ann Arbor, MI 48104-4162, USA
SPECIALFRONTIERFORCE.ESTABLISHMENT22

Despite tension, Xi says U.S.-China relations are stable

By David Brunnstrom

the evil red empire kerry xi jinping
the evil red empire kerry xi jinping

 

© REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry shakes hands with Chinese President Xi Jinping at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing.

China’s relations with the United States remain stable, Chinese President Xi Jinping said on Sunday, as he sought to defuse tension over a territorial dispute in the South China Sea that has pitted Washington against Beijing.

“I look forward to continuing to develop this relationship with President Obama and to bring China-U.S. relations to a new height along a track of a new model of major country relationship,” Xi told U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry at the end of Kerry’s two-day trip to China.

Kerry’s trip has been dominated by deepening security concerns about Beijing’s maritime ambitions in the South China Sea. China’s rapid reclamation effort around seven reefs in the Spratly archipelago of the South China Sea has alarmed claimants such as the Philippines and Vietnam.

On Saturday, Kerry urged China to take action to reduce tension in the South China Sea. His call was rebuffed by China’s Foreign Minister Wang Yi, who said Beijing’s determination to protect its interests in the area is “as hard as a rock”.

Kerry’s trip is intended to prepare for the annual U.S.-China Strategic and Economic Dialogue next month in Washington and Xi’s expected visit to Washington in September, a trip that Xi said he looked forward to.

Xi has repeatedly told Obama of his desire for a “new model of major country relationship,” in which China would be viewed as an equal global player.

the evil red empire kerry xi jinping the great hall of the people
the evil red empire kerry xi jinping the great hall of the people

© REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry talks with Chinese President Xi Jinping at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing.

But the model also outlines a respect for “each other’s sovereign and territorial integrity as well as political system and development path”.

“In my view the China-U.S. relationship has remained stable,” Xi told Kerry at Beijing’s Great Hall of the People at a session open to reporters.
China claims about 90 percent of the 3.5 million sq km (1.35 million sq mile) sea. The Philippines, Taiwan, Malaysia, Brunei and Vietnam also claim large parts of it.

Recent satellite images have shown that since about March 2014, China has conducted reclamation work at seven sites in the Spratlys and is constructing a military-sized air strip on Fiery Cross Reef and possibly a second on another reef.

The Philippines, a U.S. treaty ally, has called for urgent action.
Kerry said the United States had stated its concerns about the pace and scope of China’s land reclamation in the South China Sea.

On Saturday, China’s top diplomat, Yang Jiechi, urged Kerry to “properly control our differences and sensitive issues” as well as “view our strategic intentions objectively and rationally”, according to a report by state-run China News Service.

“I hope the United States can do more for peace and stability in the region,” Yang, who holds the title of State Councillor, was quoted as telling Kerry, referring to the South China Sea.
China has expressed its concern about a possible U.S. plan to send military aircraft and ships to assert freedom of navigation in the South China Sea.
China rejects U.S. involvement in the dispute and has blamed the United States for stoking tension by encouraging countries to engage in “dangerous behavior”.

(Additional reporting and writing by Sui-Lee Wee; Editing by Robert Birsel)

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